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Full text of "Reports of proceedings .."

3 UBLIC LIBRARY 



3 9999 06544 606 2 




BOSTON 
PUBLIC 
LIBRARY 




Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

Boston Public Library 



http://archive.org/details/reportsofproceed1868bost 



REPORTS OF PROCEEDINGS 



OF THE 



CITY COUNCIL OF BOSTON, 

FROM JULY 16, 18G8, TO JANUARY 2, 1869. 

[REPRINTED AT THE HOUSE OF REFORMATION*, DEER ISLAND.] 



Proceedings of the Common Council, 



JULY 1G, 1868. 



The regular weekly meeting' of the Common Coun- 
cil was held this evening, President Allen in the 
chair. 

Petitions sent from the Board of Aldermen were 
referred in concurrence. 

REPORT CONCURRED IN. 

Report leave to withdraw on petition of Win. Camp- 
hell it Co. for compensation for injuries to a horse 
from an alleged defect in Hanover street. 

OKDERS PASSED IN CONCURRENCE. 

Order to pay bills for July. 

Order, That the provisions of chap. 326 of the acts 
of 1868, relating to the South Boston Flats and East- 
ern avenue, be referred to a, joint special committee 
with power to make contracts with the Commonwealth 
and others to carry out the provision of said act; no 
agreement to pay money from the City Treasury to be 
valid without the approval of the City Council. 
Messrs. Osborn, Flanders and Pickering were joined 
upon the committee to consider the subject. 

Order and Resolve, For the widening of Marion 
street at an estimated cost of $25,000. 

BROADWAY UNIVERSAUIST CHURCH. 

The minority report, leave to withdraw, on the 
petition of H. A. Bowles and others in favor of the 
erection of a wooden structure for a church by the 
Broadway Universalis); Society, South Boston," was 
laid upon the table; and the order giving leave to 
the said Society to erect a church upon Broadway 
in South Boston was taken up, the Board of Alder- 
men having refused to concur in its adoption; and 
the Council voted, upon the motion of Mr. Gray, to 
adhere to its former action; and thereupon it was 
voted to ask a committee of conference. 

The Chair appointed as a Committee of conference 
on the part of the Council, Messrs. Gray, Kingsbury 
and Carney. 

ORDER REJECTED. 

Order, authorizing employment of a messenger in 
the City Solicitor's office. Rejected by a Vote of 16 to 
15. 

COMMUNICATION. 

A communication was received from the School 
Committee, in relation to lifting up the basement 
of the Unitarian church on the corner of Fourth 
and Emerson streets, South Boston, for a primary 



school. Referred 
s traction. 



to the Committee on Public In- 



REPORTS OF COMMITTEES. 

Mr. Bean of Ward 11, from the Committee on 
Public Buildings, reported an order setting apart 
a lot of land belonging to the city of Boston, situ- 
ated on Church Street, between Fayette and Marion 
streets, containing 3450 feet, for a ward room and 
hose house; also an order authorizing the. con- 
structing of a building for such purpose upon such 
lot, at an expense not exceeding $20,000; also an or- 
der authorizing the Treasurer to borrow such sum 
under the direction of the Committee on Finance. 
The report was accepted and the orders were passed 
under a suspension of the rules. 

Mr. Bean of Ward Eleven, from the Committee on 
Public Buildings, reported an order providing for 
repairs, at a cost of $2500 in the heating apparatus of 
the Lawrence School-house, and putting in two new 
steam boilers, the old ones having become almost 
useless and in a dangerous condition. The order 
was passed to a second reading. 

By Mr. Bryden of Ward Eight, from the Committee 
on streets, 'in favor of the passage of the order au- 
thorizing the purchase of estates on Tremont street 
and Federal street. The report was accepted ami 
the order was passed. 

Mr. Newton of Ward Nine, from the Committee on 
the Public Library, to whom was referred the com- 
munication of Sidney Bartlett ami others presenting 
to the city a marble bust of Mr. George TiCKnor. The 
Committee recommend the passage of the following 
resolution and order: 

iriiereas. His Honor the Mayor has transmitted to 
the City Council a communication from Sidney Bart- 
lett, Esquire, and others, presenting to the "city of 
Boston a marble bust of George Ticknor, executed 
by Mr. Milmore, with the request that it may be put 
in some suitable place in the Public Library. 

Resolved, That His Honor the Mayor be requested 
to convey to Mr. Bartlett, and to the gentlemen asso- 
ciated with him in this gift, the thanks of the City 
Council, for thus presenting an enduring memorial Of 
Mr. George Ticknor, whose long and valuable ser- 
vices as a member of the Board of Trustees, and 
whose generous contributions of books and pam- 
phlets for the Public Library, have entitled him to the 
lasting gratitude of his fellow-citizens. 

Ordered, That the Trustees of the Public Library 
be requested to provide; a suitable location, within 
the library building, for the bust of Mr. Ticknor. 

The resolution and order were adopted. 

SCHOOLHOCSE IN' WARD NINE. 
Mr. Bean of Ward Eleven, from the Committee on 
Public Buildings, reported that the sum of eighty- 
six thousand dollars is estimated as the cost of erect- 



2 



PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



ing a grammar schoolhouse in Ward Nino, on (be 
corner of Applcton ami Dartmouth streets, the build- 
ing to contain fourteen rooms and :in exhibition hull. 

.Mr. Bishop of Ward Seven considered the appro- 
priation of so large an amount entirelj unnecessary. 

Mr. Keith of Ward Fifteen moved to amend the 
order by substituting $75,000 in place of {86,000. 

Mr. Leigh ton of Ward Nine claimed that such a 
building a- the city would want could nut he built for 

any less money limn Hie amount reported. 

Sir. Osborn of Wan I si\ stated that a large portion 
of tbis expense would be for piling. The territory 
was one where a building of this kind was verj 
much needed; and in the plans there were no pro- 
visions Cor any useless ornamentation. The estimates 
had not been made by any parties in interest, but 
by persons in the habit of estimating lor city work, 
and w ere as reasonable as the city would be likely to 
gel hereafter tor schoolhouses of that size. 

Mr. Snow Of Ward Eleven hoped that, inasmuch as 
the plans had been carefully examined by the proper 
committees, and the estimates approved, the motion 
to reduce the appropriation would be withdrawn. 

.Mr. Keith of Ward Fifteen expressed his willingness 
to vote cheerfully tor expending money for the edu- 
cation of children; but. there had been appropriations 
made in some instances which he had blamed himself 
for not opposing, as in the case of a large appropria- 
tion tor a schoolhouse in South Boston, which he had 
thought enormous, but which he had not opposed, 
not desiring to be considered hostile to the interests 
of South Boston. This building, he believed, could 
be built for $75,000, and the contractors make money 
out of it at that. lie believed that it was time to 
throw some safeguards about the public treasury. 

Mr. Rockwell of Ward Ten, understood the proper 
question for the Council to consider to be, first, wheth- 
er it was necessary to build in this locality, and 
second, what the building- could be built for. The 
schoolhouse must be had. This section of the city 
was rapidly building up, and the present schoolhouses 
were entirely inadequate, and it would not be Ionic 
before still another would be wanted in that section. 
As to the estimates, they had been carefully examin- 
ed, and the whole amount seemed necessary. There 
ought to be no local jealousies excited in the matter 
of constructing schoolhouses. 

Mr. Newton of Ward Nine, thought the necessity for 
the erection of this schoolhouse imperative and the 
expense of the purchase of the land seemed to be less 
than that used for other buildings which had been put 
up. 

Mr. Osborn of Ward Six, believed that the plans 
submitted were such as would suit the city, and those 
who had the charge of education in the district. 

Mr. Wilson of Ward Twelve considered there was 
a serious misapprehension on the part of some mem- 
bers as to the relative cost of such buildings. The 
principal element of comparison between cheapness 
and extravagance related to the amount of accommo- 
dation obtained. Some of the school buildings now 
erected lacked much of the accommodation that was 
desirable. The comparison was hardly a fair one 
Which had been made with one of the school buildings 
for which increased appropriations had been made in 
the Uoxbury district. The Norcross Schoolhouse at 
South Huston presented a fair subject for comparison. 
Mr. Flynn of Ward Seven called for the previous 
question, which was sustained. 
The amendment of Mr. Keith was lost. 
The order was then rejected by a vote of 32 to 13, a 
two-thirds vote being necessary for its passage. 

Mr. Jacobs of Ward Throe, from tho joint special 
committee appointed to approve bills chargeable to 
the appropriation tor Common and squares, presented 
a report in print, requiring additional appropriation 
for the expenses of the common and public squares; 
and recommending the passage of an order transfer- 
ring $11,275 from the reserved fund to the appropria- 
tion for the common and public squares. Tho sum 
is made up from the following items: 
The appropriation for 1868-69 amount- 
ed to $44,1(17 

The expenditures have boon as follows: 
For labor on Common, Public Garden, 
public squares, and trees in streets $n,ooo 

For earth, loam, manure, and sods 9,000 

For trees, plants, shrubs, seed, etc 5,000 

For gravel, team work, paving, etc — 2,200 
For grading, sodding, and making new 

paths around "Brewer Fountain"... 3,200 
For care of Worcester, Franklin, Black- 
stone, and Lowell squares, ami 
Union Park 1,150 



t "i fence around Independence square 

South Boston 12,200 

Total expenditures authorized 18,750 

The additional appropriation will be requir- 
ed for the following purposes: 

For labor (6,000 

For red gravel 8,500 

For bulbs goo 

For East Boston squares t:.". 

For feed for deer, swans, etc... iuo 

For seat-, on Common and Public 

Garden 400 

Making a total of $11,27.") 

The order was recommitted, on motion of Mr. Bock- 
well of Ward Ten, with instruction- to report in 
detail as to the necessity of the additional appropria- 
tion. This action was taken, altera discussion par- 
ticipated in by Messrs. Wilson of Ward Twelve, 
Bishop of Ward Seven, Van No.-traml of Ward Twelve, 
and Carney and Keaney of Ward Two. 

ORDERS ADOPTED. 

Order, authorizing a door to be 'put in the Austin 
Primary schoolhouse, and the yard recently added to 
said schoolhouse, to be graded and fenced. 

Order, authorizing such repairs as may be neces- 
sary to be made in the lower rooms, fences and 
shutters of the Public Library building. 

WIDENING OF TEMPLE PEACE. 

The resolve and order, for widening of Temple 
place by taking therefor a certain parcel of land 
belonging to Frederick Bradlee, came up on its 
second reading. 

Mr. Darrow of Ward Fight considered the price 
demanded as an excessive one, and the amount of 
land to be obtained a very small one. 

Mr. Snow of Ward Eleven moved to refer the order 
to the Committee on Streets. 

Mr. Newton of Ward Nine apprehended that the 
improvements which were going on upon this street 
would be very much delayed if the order were to be 
referred. 

Mr. Rice of Ward Four considered the price of the 
la ml exorbitant. 

Mr. Wilson of Ward Twelve hoped the order would 
be referred to a Committee, that the Council might 
be informed why the street was not laid out. 

Mr. Carney stated that the Committee considered 
that the price was enormous: but thought the City 
would be willing to pay a little more than seemed rea- 
sonable in order that the street might be straight. 

Mr. Darrow, having been in the City Government 
at the time of laying out and opening Temple place, 
was of the opinion that the property holders then had 
bled the City Government enormously. 

The vote was then taken on Mr. Snow's motion, 
which prevailed, and the order was recommitted. 

Mr. Harris of Want Eleven moved to take from the 
table the order in relation to the provision and main- 
tenance of a home for soldiers and sailors. The 
motion was lost. 

ORDERS INTRODUCED. 

Mr. Wilson of Ward Twelve offered an order 
authorizing the Committee on Public Buildings to 
contract with Luther Robinson for the introduction 
of his system of ventilation into the ( ity Hall, the ex- 
pense for the same not to exceed $4,900. Ordered to 
a second reading. 

Mr. Jenks of Ward Three offered an order direct- 
ing the City Clerk to send to those persons whose 
names were designated upon the printed lists of 
voters as aliens, notice of the fact, in order that er- 
rors may be corrected. 

The motion was read a second time, Mr. Gray 
moved to refer it to the Committee on Assessors' 
Department. 

Mr. Carney of Ward Two hoped the motion would 
not prevail, as the Committee on Assessors' Districts 
had nothing to do with the subject. 

The motion to refer to the Assessors' Department 
Was rejected. 

The order was opposed by Mr. Nelson of Ward 
Nine (who moved to lay it on the table), and advo- 
cated by Messrs. Jenks of Ward Three, Bishop of 
Ward Seven, and Wells of Ward Three. The motion 
to lay on the table was lost, and the order was 
passed. 

Mr. Harris of Ward Eleven offered a resolution 
that in the opinion of the Council the Directors of 
Public Instruction should at once proceed to erect a 
building — an appropriation for the same having al- 
ready been made — for the pauper girls at Deer Island. 



PROCEEDING'S OF CITY COUNCIL. 



3 



Mr. Harris spoke in favor of the resolution. 
Before reaching any decision the Council adjourned. 



Proceedings of Board of Aldermen, 



JULY 20, 1868. 



The Board of Aldermen held their regular weekly 
meeting at 4 o'clock, P. M. His Honor Mayor Shurt- 
lefl' in the chair. 

Papers from the Common Council were severally 
acted upon in concurrence. 

PETITIONS PRESENTED AND REFERRED. 
Petition of Charles G. Greene and others for use of 
Faneuil Hall, July 29th, for a public meeting; to the 

Committee on Faneuil Hall. Petition of B. B. Leu- 
chars and others that Appleton street, from Clarendon 
street to Canton street, be accepted; to Committee on 
Streets. Petition of Joseph W. Tucker for additional 
lamps on Norfolk street; to Committee on Lamps, etc. 
Petition of Samuel Wagstatr, administrator, to be paid 
for damages caused by change of grade in Emerson 
street; to Committee on Paving. Petition of J. W. 
Merriam and others that crossing stones be laid on 
Sharon street and in Harrison avenue; to Committee 
on Paving. Petition of Charles E. Elliot and others 
that a sewer be laid in Mount Pleasant avenue and 
Forest avenue ; to Committee on Sewers. Petition of 
the Trustees of Twelfth Baptist Church for leave to 
project a recess from that church edifice into the 
Phillips Sehoolhouse yard; to Committee on Public 
Instruction. Petition of Charles Stoddard and others 
that the sidewalk around the Common be relaid; to 
Committee on the Common. Petition of Daniel 
Crowley and others for opening Chelsea Street 
Bridge. 

INTENTIONS TO BUILD. 

The following intentions to build were referred to 
the Committee on Streets : 

Of James H. Kelly on Eighth, I and K streets; 
Margaret Bralley on Fifth, between A and B streets; 
James Phillips oil Webster street; T. H. Johnson on 
Fourth between K and L streets; R. Woodman on 
Sixth between L and M streets; Thomas Kyle on 
Foundry between Hampden and Heed streets; W. H. 
Hutchinson, cor. of Grove Hall and Quincy sts. ; A. 
I). Puffer at 30 and 32 Washington street; W. C. 
Poland on Temple place; L. A. Hall on Webster, 
between Cottage and Lamson streets; Robert Wright 
on Hammond street; John Mc Barron on Emerald 
between Chapman and Dover streets; George Har- 
grave, corner of Saratoga and Putnam streets; J. G. 
Smith on Warren avenue, between Berkeley and 
Clarendon streets. 

APPOINTMENTS. 

Messrs. Charles H. Pratt, George M. Winslow, 
William Fletcher, Ignatius A. Kelly were appointed 
weighers of coal. 

QUARTERLY REPORT. 

The City Physician submitted a report for the three 
months ending June 30, sta!.h»g that during that time 
there had been S!)l persons vaccinated ; 106 certificates 
furnished for children to enter public schools; 54 
physicians supplied with vaccine lymph; 97 persons 
examined for appointment on the police ; 178 visits to 
inmates Suffolk County Jail; 5 visits to the Tempora- 
ry Home, 133 Charles street. The report also stated 
that visits had been made at various times under the 
direction of the Committee on Health, and examina- 
tions made as to the sanitary condition of various 
localities, and reports made to the Board of Health 
for their action Placed on file, and sent down. 

BROADWAY UNIVERSALIST CHURCH. 

The question being upon the appointment of a 
committee of conference, Aid. Talbot moved that the 
Board recede from their former action and concur 
with the Common Council, which was lost, by the 
following vote : 

Teas. Aldermen Braman, Cobb, Messinger, Pratt, 
Richards, Seaver, Woodman — 7 



Nays. Aldermen Fairbanks, James, Paul, Talbot, 
White— 5. 

It was then voted to appoint a committee of con- 
ference; and His Honor appointed as such committee 
Aid. Braman, Pratt and Woodman. 

REPORTS OF COMMITTEES. 

Aid. James, from Committee on Public Lands, re- 
ported leave to withdraw on petition of J. P. & D. R. 
Palmer. Accepted. 

Also, leave to withdraw on petition of L. R. Cutter 
to remove restrictions on Northlield street land. Ac- 
cepted. 

Aid. Richards, from Committee on Faneuil Hall, 
reported in favor of granting the use of Faneuil Hall 
November 2, 1SG8, to R. K. Potter and others for a 
political meeting. Accepted. 

Aid. Richards, from the Committee on Fire Depart- 
ment, reported an order authorizing transfer from 
the reserved fund to the appropriation for the Fire 
Department the sum of $23,000. Passed, under sus- 
pension of the rules. 

Aid. Paul, from the Committee on Sewers, reported 
orders in favor of constructing sewers in Norfolk 
avenue, Eustis street, and Mall street. Ordered sev- 
erally to a second reading. 

Aid. Richards, from the Committee on Public Build- 
ings, reported an order authorizing the Committee on 
Public Buildings to cause the necessary repairs and 
cleaning to be made during the vacation to the sever- 
al schoolhouses. Read twice and passed. 

Aid. Braman, from the Joint Special Committee on 
the petition of L. B. Schwabe that the city would 
purchase his collection of paintings of fallen heroes, 
reported leave to withdraw. Accepted. 

Aid. White, from the Joint Committee on Public 
Instruction, made a report on the subject of providing 
a new sehoolhouse for the Girls' High and Normal 
School, in which they say that they should hesitate to 
recommend any action at this time, were they not 
fully satisfied that a continuance of the prosperity of 
the school demanded it, and that the necessary ac- 
commodations could be furnished whithout involving 
the city in any large expenditure. 

With regard to the question of locating the school 
on the lot of land presented to the city by the Com- 
monwealth, on the corner of Berkeley and New bury 
streets, the committee say this lot is too small; it is 
not in a district which supplies, or will be likely to 
hereafter supply, any number of pupils and a more 
desirable location can be obtained on land of one- 
third the value. 

After examining many sites the committee came to 
the opinion to select the unoccupied land lying be- 
tween Newton and Pembroke streets. There are 
seven lots on the easterly side of the Church of the 
Unity, giving a front of 175 feet, and a depth of 1.33 
feet. This land is situated about midway between 
Tremont street and Blackstone square — about a half- 
minute's walk from either. 

At present one-fourth of the whole number of pu- 
is at the Normal Schools belong to Wards Ten and 
Eleven, and about half of them are living west of 
Shaw niul avenue. 

This site has received the unanimous approval of 
the Committee on the Girls' High and Normal School, 
composed of representatives from every ward in the 
city. The committee therefore recommend the pas- 
sage of the following order: 

Ordered, That the Committee on Public Buildings 
be requested to purchase the land lying between 
Newton and Pembroke streets, owned' by George A. 
Simmons, containing 26,700 square feet, more or less, 
for a sum not exceeding $1 ST™ per square foot, said 
land to be used for school purposes. 

Ordered, That the Treasurer be authorized to bor- 
row, under the direction of the Committee on Finance, 
a sum not exceeding sj!.»l,000, to be applied to the pur- 
chase of land between Newton and Pembroke streets, 
for school purposes. 

Ordered, That the Committee on Public Buildings 
be requested to procure plans and estimates for a 
building for the Girls' High and Normal School to be 
erected on Newton street, said plans to be approved 
by the Committee on Public Instruction, and report, 
with the estimates, to the City Council— the expense 
of procuring the same to be charged to the appropri- 
ation for Grammar School Public Buildings. 

The report and orders were, on motion of Alderman 
Talbot, laid on the table anil ordered to he printed. 

Alderman Talbot, from the Committee on Streets, 
reported no action neccessary on sundry notices of 
intention to build. Accepted. 

Alderman Messinger, from the Committee on 



Pi 



3?ROCTCKT>TISraR OF CITY COUNflL. 



Health, reported an order directing the Superintend- 
ent of Health to abate sundry nuisances. Passed. 

Aldermen Talbot, from the Committee on Laving 
Out and Widening Streets), reported leave to w ithdraw 
on petition of Ann l*. Buttrick, for hearing relative t<> 
assessment upon her estate in Richmond s.treet. Ac- 
cepted. 

Aldermen Talbot from the Committee on Streets, 
reported an order £o pay Patrick Kelley $2,959 54, for 
land taken and damages occasioned by the widening 
and grading of Oliver street, upon his giving a deed 
for the same to the city and satisfactory discharge. 
< »rder passed. 

ORDERS ADOPTED. 

Order directing the Committee on Bridges to report 
the expense of widening Federal street bridge to 
seventy feet in "width exclusive of the draw, and re- 
port the necessary orders for widening the same. 

order authorizing the Committee on Bridges to 
contract for repairing Chelsea street bridge at an ex- 
pense not exceeding $8,000. 

Order that the old almshouse in the Highlands, 
recently surrendered in the City Council by the di- 
rectors of public institutions, be placed in the care 
and custody of the Committee on Public Buildings. 

order giving notice to the Cambridge Railroad 
Company of the intention of the Board to repave 
( lambridge street between Chambers and North Rus- 
sell streets, and directing the company to repave on 
said streets the space between their" rails and three 
ieet on each side with small granite blocks. 

Order that, until otherwise ordered, there be allow- 
ed and paid to the Independent Corps of Cadets for 
rent of armory the sum of $300, in addition to the 
amount prescribed by law, said sum to be charged to 
the Appropriation for Amories. 

Order that the Committee on Public Buildings be 
authorized to erect four tire alarm bell-towers in the 
Boston Highlands district, one each on a schoolhouse 
or engine-house, to be selected by the Committee on 
Public Buildings and Fire Alarms, at an expense not 
exceeding live thousand dollars; also an order au- 
thorizing the Auditor of Accounts to draw such 
amount from the reserved fund. 

Order that the Committee on Police be directed to 
examine house No. 2 Wendell street, ami ascertain if 
it is in a dangerous condition and liable to fall, and 
to take necessary measures for public safety, the ex- 
pense to be charged to the appropriation for Oliver 
street. 

Order that the Chief of Police be authorized to no- 
tify the owner of estate of No. 11 Oliver street to close 
up a bulkhead recently constructed in the sidewalk in 
front of said estate. 

Order that the Chief Engineer, under the direction 
of the Committee on the Fire Department, be author- 
ized to contract for the exchange of old engine No. 8 
for a new engine, at an expense not exceeding $4,250, 
the same t<> be charged to the appropriation for the 
Fire Department. 

READ ONCE. 

Order to repave Cambridge street, between Cham- 
bers and Blossom streets, with small granite blocks. 
Read once. 

RECOMMITTED. 

The subject of assessing the abutters on Bowker 
street their proportional share of the betterments on 
account of the widening of said street, was considered 
and recommitted. 

LAII> ON THE TABLE. 

The order that Nathaniel Whiting lie directed to 
show cause why the building 30 Hamilton street 
should not he adjuged a nuisance was laid upon the 
table, on motion of Aldermen Messinger, who stated 
that satisfactory arrangements had been made in the 
case. 

COMMUNICATION. 

An imitation was received from the Montgomery 
Light (iaurds to join in an excursion of the company 
to New York, commencing 28th instant; also to attend 
exhibition drill of the company. Accepted and 

placed cm tile. 

FANEUIL HALL MARKET. 

Aid. James called upon the Chairman of the Com- 
mittee on Faneuil Hall Market for a report upon the 
transfer of stalls in the Market. 

Aid. Woodman, from that Committee, stated that 
the time allowed him by the rules to make his report 
— four weeks — had not yet expired, and he asked for 
further time. 



Aid. James remarked that he understood the iir-i 
petition respecting the subject bail been presented 
and referred to the Committee some three months 
since. There seemed to be considerable feeling con- 
cerning the matter outside, and he had been requested 
to bring up the question. 

Aid. Talbot desired some reason for the delay. It 
had been understood that the matter was to be re- 
ported upon promptly. 

Aid. Woodman stated that he should probably be 
ready to report next Monday. 

It was voted to allow the Chairman of the Commit- 
tee further time. 

It was voted on motion of Alderman Talbot that 
■when the Hoard adjourn on the third of August it be 
to meet again August 24. 

Adjourned until Thursday Dext at twelve o'clock M. 



Proceedings of Board of Aldermen, 



JULY 2-3, 180 8. 



An adjourned meeting of the Hoard of Aldermen 

was held at 12 o'clock to-day, the chairman, Aldermen 
Messinger, presiding. 

PETITIONS. 
H. C. Morse and others, that the sidewalks on 
Zeigler street be laid; D. (i. Baskins and others for 
a culvert under Grove Hall avenue, near Quincy 
street ; Wm. F. Cogan. for damages for injuries to his 
horse on the corner of Second and C streets. 

QUARTERLY REPORT. 

The Superintendent of streets reported that there 
bad been expended and charged to the appropriation 
for paving, grading, and repairing of streets in this 
city during the quarter ending June 30, the sum of 
sss, 106.42 ; amount paid into the City Treasury during 
the same period, and credited to the paving depart- 
ment $1,482.22. 

WIDENING or TREMONT STREET. 

A hearing was announced on the order of notice 
relative to the widening of Tremont street, from Boyl- 
Ston street to Seaver place. 

A letter was read from Caroline E. Jcpson, against 
the same, being unable on account of infirmities to 
appear, but objecting for various reasons, principally 
because the injury to her estate would make it unsal- 
able. 

The report was recommitted, ami subsequently 
Alderman Talbot, from the Committee, made a report 
giving reasons for the change in the proposed mode 
in the widening of the street. 

They say that in all attempts to settle with the 
Owners of estates abutting upon the present line of 
the street from BoylstOn street to Seaver place, where 
the widening is upon both sides, the committee have 
found great difficulty in coining to any agreement in 
regard to the amount of damages, for the reason that 
the line of the street is not parallel to the present line. 
so that where a building can be moved back it cannot 
be placed upon the ne\B line of the street, and where a 
block requires to be removed, they have been unable 
to consider the subject with the owners with any 
prospect of a satisfactory agreement. 

The new line proposed i- substantially parallel to 
the present line of (he street. In view of the facts, 
they believe that the widening on the westerly side 
can be made for the same cost as upon the easterly 
side. The committee have the refusal of the estate (if 
S. I). Ward and have agreed upon the terms for which 
the Bote] Pelham can be removed, should the pro- 
posed widening be carried out. The owners on the 
easterly side have agreed to release damages if the 
widening on that side is discontinued. A certificate 
is appended from well known builders and architect-, 
in regard to the feasibility ami risk of removing the 
Hotel Pelham. 

The Committee do not ask for any further appro- 
priation for the widening, but conclude with several 
orders necessary for carrying out the proposed plan 
of w idening. 



PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



5 



In considering the orders, Aldermen Paul stated 
that the difficulty had hitherto been as to the feasibil- 
ity of removing the Hotel Pelham, and the objection 
to cutting off the Tremont street mall in the widening 

of Tremont street. The first is removed by the opin- 
ion of competent persons, and the general approba- 
tion in relation to cutting oil' the corner of the mall on 
Tremont street, justifies the conclusion that at no dis- 
tant day, Tremont street will be widened further by 
cutting off a portion of the mall. 

The several orders for the widening of the street 
were read twice anil passed, the first providing 
that Tremont street should be widened on the 
westerly side, between Boylston street and Seaver 
place, by taking parcels of land belonging to J. II. 
Di\, Charles W. Galloupe and Sereno I). Nicker- 
son, Francis Bundy, heirs of Samuel Jepson, Annie 
F. and Harriet Louisa Oden, Jonathan Patten, John 
Leukhardt, Luther Parker, Sarah A. Hammond, a 
portion of Kulm place, Eunice M. Gridley and Eliza 
A. Gridley, Franklin Smith. 

The other orders authorize the purchase of the 
estate of S. D. Ward, on Boylston street, adjoining 
the Hotel Pelham, containing 8290 feet at a sum not 
exceeding- $65,000, and that in the settlement of 
damages occasioned by the removal of the Hotel 
Pelham, the committee be authorized to convey to 
Dr. John II. I)i\ the estate above mentioned, provided 
the city acquire a title thereto. An additional order 
authorizes the committee in the settlement of dama- 
ges with the owners of estates, parts of which have 
been taking for laying out and widening streets, 
to enter into agreements with such owners for 
removing back by the city, any buildings standing 
in part or in whole on the land so taken. 

Whenever the said committee shall deem it ex- 
pedient so to do, and whenever they shall make 
such agreement, they are also authorized to execute 
the same by contracting for the necessary work to 
be done. 

REPORTS OF COMMITTEES. 

Reports were made by the Committee on Claims, 
leave to withdraw, on the petition of George M. 
King to be paid for injuries to his hack from an 
alleged defect in the roadway in Chester park; 
also, on petition of Edward II. Stevens, for dam- 
ages for injuries in being run over by a hose car- 
liage belonging to the Fire Department. Ac- 
cepted. 

Reports were made by the Committee on Licenses 
granting licenses to several persons as victuallers 
and innholders, as bootblacks and for keeping a 
billiard table. Severally accepted. 

ORDERS ADOPTED. 

Order directing the Superintendent of Sewers to 
construct a sewer in Wall street, and report the 
expense of the same to this Board. 

Order directing the Superintendent of Sewers to 
construct a sewer in Norfolk avenue, and report 
the expense of the same to this Board. 

Order directing the Superintendent of Streets to 
repave Cambridge street, between Chambers and 
Blossom streets, with small granite blocks. 

Order directing the Superintendent of Streets to 
execute the order of October 8, 1807, to repave 
Richmond street, between Hanover and Salem 
streets. 

Order directing the Chief of Police to notify the 
owners anil abutters on Chapman street, between 
Suffolk and Tremont streets, to furnish new edge- 
stones for sidewalks. 

Order to pay Patrick Kelly $'29.">9.. r 4 for land tak- 
en, with interest, in the widening of Oliver street. 

Order to pay heirs of Luther Swan $0000 for land 
taken in widening Tremont street, under order of 
June 6, 1868. 

Orders were passed to pa} - some 40 bills of mem- 
bers of the city government, amounting in the ag- 
gregate to about $7000. 

Alderman Woodman offered an order that the 
Mayor instruct the Chief-of-Police to enforce the 
laws in accordance with State statutes and city or- 
dinances in regard to all obstructions of all side-walks 
and streets within the city of Boston forthwith. 

After some remarks by the mover and by Alder- 
man Paul, the latter in' opposition, the order was 
laid on the table by a vote of 11 to 1, the mover in 
the negative. 

Adjourned to Monday next. 



Proceedings of the Common Council, 



JULY 23, 1868. 



The regular weekly meeting of the Common Coun- 
cil was held this evening, President Allen in the 
chair. 

Petitions from the Board of Aldermen were referred 
in concurrence. 

REPORTS CONCURRED IN. 

Reports leave to withdraw — on the petition of L. B. 
Schwabe, for the city to purchase his military por- 
traits; on the petition of L. R. Cutter and others for 
the removal of the restrictions on the Northfield 
street land; on the petition of J. P. and I). R. Palmer 
for the location of the boundaries of a lot of land on 
Brookline street; on the petition of George M. King- 
to be paid for injuries to his hack from an alleged 
defect in the roadway in Chester Park; and on peti- 
tion Edward H. Stevens, for damages for injuries in 
being run over by a hose carriage belonging to the 
Fire Department. 

ORDERS PASSED IN CONCURRENCE. 

Order, for the necessary repairs of the Primary 
Schoolhouses to be made during the vacation. 

Order, to place the Old Almshouse in the Highlands 
in the custody of the Committee on Public Buildings. 

Order, for repairs on the Chelsea Street Bridge 

Orders, for the erection of four Alarm Bell Towers 
in the Highlands, one each on a school or engine 
house,— to be selected by the Committees on Public, 
Buildings and Fire Alarms. 

Order, to pay bills of members of the city govern- 
ment. 

Order, authorizing the Committee on laving out and 
widening streets in the settlement of damages with 
the owners of estates, parts of which have been taken 
for laying out and widening streets, to enter into 
agreements with such owners for removing back by 
the city any buildings standing in part or in whole on 
the land so taken. Whenever the said committee 
shall deem it expedient so to do; and whenever they 
shall make such agreement, they are also authorized 
to execute the same by contracting for the necessary 
work to be done. 

The order that the heating apparatus of the Law- 
renc Sehoolhouse be repaired. 

READ ONCE. 

The order to transfer $23,000 from the Reserved 
Fund to the appropriation for the Fire Department, 
on account of the increase of the salaries of the mem- 
bers of the said department was read once anil 
ordered to a second reading. 

THE VENTILATION OF CITY HALE. 

The order, that a contract be made with Luther 
Robinson to introduce his system of ventilation into 
the City Hall, was considered, as untinshed business. 

Mr. Morse of Ward Thirteen moved that it be re- 
ferred to the Committee on Public Buildings. 

Mr. Wells of Ward Three objected to the report 
that buildings were badly ventilated which were ven- 
tilated by Mr. Robinson's plan. 

Mr. Keith of Ward Fifteen, in an examination of 
the system, was satisfied that it was the most perfect, 
simplest mode of ventilation, in accordance with nat- 
ural principles, and commended itself to every man's 
common sense. Mr. Robinson warranted its success, 
and the expense would be at his own cost if not suc- 
cessful. It would be but a trifle, and if successful 
would be worth Ave times the expense of the appara- 
tus. 

Mr. Wadsworth of Ward Four believed the svstem 
to be in accordance with the laws of nature. He had 
employed Mr. Robinson in the ventilation of a large 
building, and this building, in which people meet once 
a week, had been ventilated to the satisfaction of the 
1000 persons who meet there. 

The order was passed. 

LAID ON THE TABLE. 

The resolve that in the opinion of the Council the di- 
rectors of public institutions should proceed to erect 
a building for the pauper girls at Deer Island was 
laid on the table. 

WIDENING OF TREMONT STREET. 

The reports and orders for a change in the widen, 
ing of Tremont street, came up on the question of 



G 



PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



concurrence. The report was accepted and ordered 
to be placed on file. 

The order i<> take land for the widening of the 
Street, as proposed, was read once, and a motion 
being under consideration for its second reading, Mr. 
Wads worth of Ward 4 objected. II appeared by the 
repori that the coat of the proposed removal of the 
Hotel Pelham would be $80,000— $65,000 for the estate 
of Mr. Ward, and $15,000 for the removal of the build- 
ing. This would be at the rate of $1000 a foot, which 
he considered an enormous expense, lie believed the 
Widening could he made much cheaper on the easterly 
side. 

Mr. Wilson of Ward Twelve thought it illadvised to 
force the subject to-night. Alter a thorough consid- 
eration of the former widening, the measure was 
passed, ami he would not act upon the change with- 
out due deliberation, tt might be all right, yel lest a 
{Treat mistake should he made, as in some Other cases, 
he would have the matter lie over lor subsequent 
action. 

On the motion ofMr. Jcnks of Ward Three, the or- 
der was referred to the Committee on Streets on the 
part of the Council. 

The other orders relating to the purchase of the 
Ward estate and the settlement with John II. Dix, 
were disposed of in the same way, without debate. 

Mr. Snow of Ward Eleven moved a suspension of 
the rules, to allow a motion for reconsideration. 

Mr. Keith of Ward Fifteen raised a question of or- 
der, that such a motion was not admissable at the 
present time. 

The chair ruled that it was in order, ami that a sim- 
ilar suspension in the passage of the orders had 
taken place during the evening session. 

A motion for a suspension of the rules was lost, not 
two-thirds voting therefor. 

PETITIONS. 

Ira L. Moore and others, for the laying out of a 
street from West Canton street to Dartmouth street; 
W T m. C. Poland, for redress on account of the occupa- 
tion of property claimed by him; Anna M. Harrod, 
for damages sustained by an assault in the public 
streets by a person convicted therefor. 

REPORTS OF COMMITTEES. 

By Mr. Wright of Ward Twelve, from the Commit- 
tee on the celebration of the 4th of July, with an or- 
der, providing for an additional appropriation for 
$1500. 

Mr. Bishop of Ward Seven objected to the addition- 
al appropriation, on the ground that the original ap- 
propriation was large, and the Committee had no 
authority to exceed that sum. 

Mr. Wright said the people could not have the pud- 
ding without paying for it. The money had been ex- 
pended, and the appropriation to meet it might as 
well he made now, as after a considerable discussion 
and complaint. 

Mr. Jenks of Ward Three was opposed to voting- 
extra appropriations on account of such expenditures. 

Mr. Wadsworthof Ward Four said he was informed 
on good authority that $100 was paid to a gentlemam 
who owned a private yacht, to enable him to entertain 
his friends. If money was spent in such a Way, the 
committee should foot the bills. 

A motion for a suspension of the rules to give the 
order a second reading, was lost, 23 to 14. 

Mr. Bean of Want Eleven, from the Committee on 
Public Buildings on the part of the Common Council, 
to whom was referred the order relating to a court 
room in the Southern District, reported the order in 
a new < I raft as follows : 

Ordered, That the Committee on Public Buildings 
he authorized to alter the room formerly used by the 
Common Council of Roxbury into a court room for 
the Southern district, and to convert the present 
court room into an office for the Judge and Clerk of 
said Court, the expense thereof to be charged to the 
appropriation for the County of Suffolk. 

Mr. Train of Ward Three hoped the order would 
not pass. During the last session of the Legislature 
lie introduced an order for the abolition of the court 
in the Southern District, and did not doubt that an- 
other Legislature would abolish it. The court was 
of no more convenience than a court would be in Fast 
Boston or South Boston, and was kept up at a cost in 
salaries of $5,500 a year. Such a division in court 
business only works trouble. He hoped there would 
be no more money spent on it, and he did not doubt 
that if bis friend from Ward Fifteen should freely 
express his opinion, he would agree with him that it 
would be better for the people that the business 
should all be done in one court. 



Mi-. Keith of Ward Fifteen did not tear to express 
his opinion al an\ time. The present court loom was 
fitted up but three or four years ago. and answer- 
very well. If it was designed to abolish it in one or 
five years he should hesitate about spending any 

considerable sum ol money on it. In regard to ex- 
pense, the tines received pay the expenses of the 

court. 

.Mr. Train said the Judges of the Municipal Court 
were willing to take upon them the additional labor 
of the court of the Southern District. 

.Mr. Morse of Ward Thirteen was opposed to -pend- 
ing any more money on this court. If the majority 
of the people of Roxbury could have their way they 
would hold up both hands to nave the court abolished.. 
The building in which it is proposed the court -hall 
he held is now in litigation, and it would be a waste 
of money to tit it up for the court. He moved to make 
the appropriation $300. Lost. 

The order and the original draft were severally 
rejected. 

Mr. Bean of Ward Eleven, from the Committee on 
Public Buildings, on the order requiring a report 
upon the cost of erecting an elevator in the City Hall, 
made a report in which they state that they have 
received a proposal from Oilman Joslin, ottering to 
erect one of bis rotary elevators in the well room of 
the City Hall, provide a suitable steam engine and 
boiler, and operate the same, and run the elevator for 
three months without charge, providing that if at the 
end of that time the elevator works to the satisfaction 
of the committee, he shall be paid the sum ot $10,000, 
but if the committee are not satisfied he agrees to 
remove the apparatus, and restore the well to its 
original condition. The committee submitted the 
following order: 

Ordered, That the Committee on Public Buildings 
be authorized to contract with Oilman Joslin for the 
introduction of his rotary elevator into the City Hall, 
upon such terms and conditions as they deem "for the 
best interests of the city, the expense "thereof, if the 
elevator is purchased by the city, to be provided for 
hereafter by special loan. 

After a few remarks, the report was laid on the 
table and ordered to be printed. 

Mr. Cray of Ward Twelve, from the committee of 
conference on the subject of the erection of a wooden 
building for a church by the Broadway Uhiversalist 
Society, made a report that the order Of the Common 
Council in favor of granting the petition ought to 
pass. The report was accepted, ami the Council ad- 
hered to its former action in the passage of the 
order. 

Mr. Bryden of Ward Eight, from the Committee 
on the resolve and order for the widening of Temple 
place by taking land of F. H. Bradlee, reported that 
the land taken for the widening projects about live 
feet beyond the line of the other portion of the street, 
and as a new building was about to be erected, it was 
deemed advisable to make the widening at this time. 
The land is valued at $20 per foot, and the cost of 
the widening with the land, including damages to 
the building, is estimated at $20,000. It is further 
estimated that $10,000 can be assessed upon the owners 
of abutting estates. As a measure of convenience 
and economy, the committee recommend the passage 
of the resolve and order. 

The report was accepted, and the order was passed, 
in concurrence. 

The Committee on Overseers of the Poor, on the 
part of the Common Council, reported that the order 
authorizing the Overseers of the Poor to expend 
$4000 in furnishing the new Temporary Home, ought 
to pass. Accepted and order passed. " 

Mr. Woolley of Ward One, from the Committee on 
Bathing, made a report in relation to the bathing 
house on Cabot street, concluding that the house 
was now in good condition. Accepted. 

Mr. Tucker of Ward Six, from the Committee on 
the Fire Department on the part of the Common 
Council, (to whom was referred the order authorizing 
the Committee on Public Buildings to procure plans 
and specifications for a building to be erected on the 
corner of Winslow and Sumner streets, to contain 
accommodations for Hook and Ladder Carriage No. 4 
and a Ward Room for Ward Thirteen,) reported that 
the order ought to pass. 

A minority report was made by Mr. DaiTOWOf Ward 
Fight, who gave his reasons therefor. 

Mr. Morse of Ward Thirteen moved an order pro- 
viding for the erection of a building for a hook and lad- 
der house and a ward room at an expense of $20,000. 

The amendment and the order of the committee w ere 
rejected, when Mr. Osborn of Ward Six moved the 



PROCEEDINGS OP CITY COUNCIL. 



order of the minority of the committee, providing that 
the Committee on Public Buildings procure a suit- 
able site in the vicinity of the Post-Office and report 
plans and estimates of the cost of a building for a ward 
room and a hook and ladder house. 

Considerable debate ensued, in the course of which 
Mr. Train of Ward Three spoke of the inexpediency 
of erecting buildings for ward-rooms in Wards Thir- 
teen, Fourteen, and Fifteen — wants which now had 
much larger power than any of the other city wards, 
and which must be changed' after the next census. In 
his view annexation had been mainly in the interest 
of Roxbury. 

Mr. Keith of Ward Fifteen defended the annexation 
of Roxbury on the ground that a large population and 
much wealth had been added to the city, and an im- 
mense territory had been added, which would prove 
to be of great 'future advantage. He did not believe 
that any of the old wards of the city had been jewed 
by annexation. The people of Boston proved, by 
their votes for annexation, that they regarded the 
measure as advantageous to the city. 

COMMON AND PUBLIC SQUARES. 

Mr. Jacobs of Ward Three, from the joint special 
committee to whom was recommitted the report for 
an additional appropriation for the Common and pub- 
lic squares, with instructions to report a full and de- 
tailed statement of the causes which have required the 
expenditures, submitted a detailed statement pre- 
pared by the Auditor of Accounts. 

The statement gives as the expenditures for inciden- 
tals $231") HI, of which $600 was for salary of Superin- 
tendent; $348 for watering Charles street; $503 59 for 
tools, handcarts, &c; $384 for forty-eight park settees; 
$107 for freight and teaming plants, settees, &c. ; 
$106 0") for expenses of committee ; $53 80 lor carriage- 
hire; $42 for buggy-hire for Superintendent, and $40 
for expenses to New York ; and $112 91 for subsistence 
for deer, ducks, &c. 

Common— Expenses $9707 30; laborers $3337 82; 
sods $2695; teaming $107 75 ; 100 loads of loam $240; 
trees $01 25; repairs, including paving, $1074 77; flag- 
ging West street to Park square $2181 80. 

Brewer Fountain — Laborers $687 50; teaming 111 
days $339 50; 2883 loads of dirt $1009 05; sods $651; 39 
loads oyster shells $78; 108 do. gravel $249 2.); 6 do. 
red do. '$54— total $3196 84. 

Public Garden— Laborers, $40.59 67; sods $2170 74; 
loam, $1330 50; dirt, $184165; plants, seeds, Ac, $2739 
84; swan house, $200; total $13,260 69. 

City Hall grounds, $713; Chester park ami squares 
$1400' 43; other squares $450 22; Fast Boston, $271 38; 
Public Library grounds, $27 75; South Boston, $44000; 
Streets, $130; Rutland square fence, $33 42. 

The total aggregate expenditures were — for sods, 
$9000 14; laborers, $8335 14; repairs, including flag- 
ging, $4018 15; plants, trees, &c, $3389 70; Brewer 
fountain, $3196 84; incidentals, $2340 81; contractors, 
for care of squares, $650; teaming $239 75 — making 
$32,139 53. 

The report was laid on the table and ordered to be 
printed. 

ORDERS ADOPTED. 

Order, that the Committee on Water consider the 
expediency of providing suitable drinking places for 
horses and Other animals throughout the city. 

order, directing the Committee on the Celebration 
of the Fourth of July to report in detail the amount of 
money expended by sub-committees with the name of 
the parties and for what purpose. 

ORDERS INTRODUCED. 

By Mr. Bean of Ward Eleven, an order directing the 
Committee on Public Buildings to make such altera- 
tions and repairs on Police Stations Nos. Three and 
Four as the Committee on Police may require, the ex- 
pense to be charged to the appropriation for public 
buildings. Read once. 

By Mr. Kingsbury of Ward Fifteen, that the Com- 
mittee on Public Buildings be authorized to purchase 
a lot of land on Washington street, near Cabot street, 
for a ward room and a hook and ladder house. Re- 
ferred. 

Bv Mr. Newton of Ward Nine, that the Committee 
on Public Buildings be authorized to expend, not 
exceeding $3,000, in dredging and repairing the slips 
and drops formerly occupied by the People's Ferry 
Company, on the East Boston side. Laid over. 

NEW SCHOOLHOUSE IN WARD NINE. 

Mr. Snow of Ward Eleven moved a reconsideration 
of the rejection of the order for the erection of a new 
schoolhouse on the corner of Appleton and Dartmouth 



streets, in Ward Nine, at a cost of $86,000. The motion 
was carried. 

Mr. Morse of Ward Thirteen moved to subsitnte 
$75,000 in each case in place of $86,000. The motion 
was rejected. 

After some debate upon the relative cost of school- 
houses had taken place, in which it was assumed by 
Messrs. Rockwell of Ward Ten and Osborn of Ward 
Six that there was a great demand for the erection of 
this house, and the people had been waiting impa- 
tiently for it, the previous question was ordered, and 
the order was passed, by a vote of 40 yeas to 7 nays. 

A motion to adjourn, 'amended to make it the last 
Thursday evening in September, was lost. 

THE NOTICE TO ALIENS. 

Mr. Wilson of Ward Twelve moved a reconsidera- 
tion of the order of the last meeting, directing the City 
Clerk to send to those persons whose names were des- 
ignated upon the printed lists of voters as aliens, no- 
tice of the fact, in order that errors may be corrected. 

Mr. Jeuks of Ward Three opposed the motion, stat- 
ing that the parties should have the notice as a simple 
act of justice. 

Mr. Bishop of Ward Seven moved to lay the motion 
on the table. Lost, as was also a motion to adjourn. 

Mr. Harris of Ward Eleven moved the previous 
question. 

Mr. Keith of Ward Fifteen wished to debate the 
previous question, but was ruled out of order. 

The motion was carried. 

Mr. Morse of Ward Thirteen moved the yeas and 
nays on the pending question. 

A motion by Mr. Bishop to adjourn was ruled out 
of order, the previous question requiring a vote at 
once. 

Mr. Rockwell of Ward Ten asked to be excused 
from voting on the question of reconsideration. 
Refused. 

Mr. Morse of Ward Thirteen rose to a question of 
order, that a motion to adjourn was always in order. 

Mr. Bishop of Ward Seven renewed his motion to 
adjourn. 

The chair insisted upon the decision that, the motion 
was out of order. 

Mr. Bishop appealed from the decision of the chair. 

Mr. Nelson of Ward Nine moved to lay the appeal 
on the table. 

Mr. Bishop moved the yeas and nays, which was 
carried. 

The appeal was laid on the table bv a vote of 29 
to 18. 

Mr. Rockwell of Ward Ten moved an adjournment 

The chair repeated the decision that an adjournment 
was not in order. 

The reconsideration of the order was carried by a 
vote of 30 to 17. 

Mr. Wilson moved an amendment to the order. 

Mr. Wright of Ward Twelve moved its indefinite 
postponement, which was carried. 

Mr. Butler of Ward Ten moved a reconsideration, 
which was lost. 

A motion was made to adjourn, amended on mo- 
tion of Mr. Osborn of Ward Six, to make it the last 
Thursday evening in September. 

Objection was made that business would require 
further meetings, which was answered bv the state- 
ment that special meetings could be called at any 
time. 

Mr. Snow of Ward Eleven moved the previous 
question, which was carried. 

The motion for adjournment prevailed, and at 11 
o'clock the Council adjourned to the last Thursday 
in September. 



PROCEEDINGS OF CITV COUNCIL. 



Proceedings of Board of Aldermen, 

JULY 27, 1808. 



The Board of Aldermen held tbeir regular meet- 
Ing at l o'clock 1*. M., His Honor Mayor Shurtleff 
presiding. 

Papers from the Common Council, with two ex- 
ceptions, were acted upon in concurrence. 

IK I Tl IONS PRESENTED AM) REFERRED. 

Petition of Edwin Bay and others, for a sewer in 
Warren street, from Moreland to Jioeklaud streets; 
or Hawes A Hersey and others, for abatement of a 
nuisance on Second Street, between E and F 
streets; of N. I). silsbec and others, for gas lamps 
in Codman avenue; of Charles F. Bellows and oth- 
ers, for a crossing from the northerly side of Han- 
son street to Tremont street; of John Cummings 
and others, for abatement of a nuisance caused by 
smoke, &C, at Ingols & Talbot's brass foundry; 
of Henry M. Harmon and others, that Rockville 
place be accepted as a public place; of William L. 
Burt, to change the proposed grade of Devonshire 
ami Water streets, and raise the same two to three 
feet at the junction of those streets, above the line 
now determined upon, and thus give a more easy 
and safe communication through Water street be- 
tween Washington street and Devonshire street, 
to the new Post Office and Sub-Treasury building; 
of Engine Co. No. 4, against the confirmation of a 
certain person as a member of that company; pe- 
tition of the Boston Water Power Company, stat- 
ing that corporation would like to exchange any 
land they have for the strip of land owned by the 
city on the east side of Northampton street. 

INTENTIONS TO BUILD. 

J. E. & X. Brown, i) and 11 Nigh street; Cum- 
mings A. Sears, Primmer street; William Evans, 
Washington, corner of Lenox street; Wm. Gold- 
smith, Prentiss street, between Parker and Tre- 
mont streets ; Robert E. Apthorp, 11 South Russell 
street", S. Hoft'ses, corner London and Meridian 
streets; T. B. Huntoon, Woodbine street; A. & 
J. McLaren, Trenton, between Marion and Brooks 
streets; James Devine, corner Cabot and Tremont 
streets; Silas Foss, Trenton, between Prooks and 
White; Catherine Barker, ('helsea street, near old 
bridge; Holbrook & Harlow, between F and Dor- 
chester streets; John P. Russell, Condor, between 
Prooks and Meridian streets; Faulkner & Clark, 
Lenox and Sawyer streets. 

Alderman Talbot reported no action necessary 
upon sundry notices to build presented at the last 
meeting. Accepted. 

ORDERS TO PAY. 

Alderman Talbot, from the Committee on Streets, 
reported the following orders : 

Order to pay Robert Codman, agent of the heirs 
of C. M. Ilurd and others, and Elizabeth D. Good- 
rich and James Pent, lessees, $050 for land taken 
and damages occasioned by the widening of Cross 
street; passed. Order to pay Samuel W. Phillips 
$10,000 for his estate on Tremont street, corner of 
Warrenton street; read once. Order to pay Haynes 
& Wright $-27,000 for their estate on Federal street, 
adjoining Federal street bridge; passed. Order to 
pay Leonard Hyde $050 for land taken to widen 
Day street (fromerly Cross street;) read once. Or- 
der to pay Mary Forest $10,000 for her estate on 
Tremont street; read once. 

ORDERS OF NOTICE. 

Alderman Talbot, from the Committee on Streets, 
introduced the following orders, which were sever- 
ally passed. 

Order of notice to quit, to heirs of Abiel Smith, 
Harriet I). Reed and Charles K. Kirby, upon Dev- 
onshire street. 

Order of notice to quit, to heirs of Thatcher R. 
and Freeborn F. Raymond, on Cross street. 

Order of notice, to Mary Eliza Bird and all others 
interested on South Cedar street. 

Order of notice to Harrison Richie and Samuel 
Eliot, trustees of estate of William F. Otis, and 
also Ebeuezer Johnson and William H. Mann and 
all otbers interested in the extension of Brimmer 
street, from Mount Vernont to Chestnut street. 

Order of notice in regard to the laying out of Ham- 
mond street upon land belonging to the city. 



Order of notice in regard to the widening of Har- 
rison avenue by taking land of Charles H. Bacon, 
174.2 square feet ; read once, 

Order of notice by Chief of Police to owners ami 
abutters on Zeigler street to lay their sidewalk with 
brick within -20 days. 

ORDERS ADOPTED. 

That the Committee on Laying Out and Widening 
Streets be authorized to sell by public auction such 
buildings as stand on the line or widening ofTremont 
Street, in whole or in part, between Poylston street 
and Jefferson street, at such times as they shall deem 
expedient, after the first day of August next. 

That the Committee on Public Buildings be au- 
thorized to erect a shed at the West City Stables, 
Boston Highlands, the expense thereof to be charged 
to the appropriation for public buildings, 

That there be paid to Haynes H. Wright the sum 
of $-27,000 for his estate on Federal street. 

That until otherwise ordered, there be allowed and 
paid tii Company A, First Regiment of Infantry, M. V. 
M., for rent of armory, $200 in addition to the amount 
prescribed by law. 

That the Chief of Police be directed to notify the 
owners and abutters on Cambridge street, Nos". 101, 
ip.5, 117, 129, 185, 70, 92, 102, 104, 112, 114, US, 122, to 
furnish new edgestones to support the sidewalk. 

That the Committee on Public Buildings take charge 
of the erection of all music stands hereafter required 
for the use of the city, and also that they have the care 
and custody of the music stands already erected on 
the public grounds. 

REPORTS OF COMMITTEES. 

Alderman White from the Committee on Licenses, 
reported in favor of granting leave to stone & Murray, 
to exhibit a circus company in this city, from Aug. 17 
to Aug. 25; also a number of victuallers' licenses to 
sell papers. 

Alderman Pratt, from the Committee on Markets 
— a majority of that committee — reported an order, 
that the transfer of lease of stalls 05 and 07, Faneuil 
Hall market, by Saunders & Hartwell to Ballard & 
Locke, be and the same is hereby approved by the 
Board. Passed. 

Alderman James, from the Committee on Paving, 
recommended leave to withdraw on petition of J. and 
D. Pratt, for compensation for damages to their estate 
on Eutaw street, caused by change of grade. The 
same committee reported leave to withdraw on the 
petition of Penj. Jones, for leave to rebuild water tank 
at the foot of Mount Vernon street. 

Alderman Talbot, from the Committee on Streets, 
reported leave to withdraw on the petition of Lemuel 
Crehore and others, that Mount Vernon avenue be 
accepted as a public street. 

Alderman Cobb, from the Committee on the Police, 
reported an order that the building on the corner of 
Wendall and Oliver streets, owned by Moses Kimball 

and occupied by Lynch, is so undermined as to 

be in a dangerous condition, that said Kimball and 
Lynch be notified to appear before this Board on 
Monday next, at 4 o'clock P. M., and show cause why 
said house should not be declared a nuisance, and 
be abated accordingly. Order passed. 

Alderman White," from the Committee on Licenses, 
reported the licenses to sundry innholders and vict- 
uallers. Accepted. 

Alderman James, from the Committee on Paving, 
reported the following order, with accompanying or- 
der of loan of $25,000: Ordered, that the Committee 
on Paving be authorized to make such arrangements 
with the abutters on Shawm ut avenue and Ruggles 
street, for the raising of their houses to the established 
grade, and for the settlement of grade damasres to 
their respective estates, as in the opinion of said Com- 
mittee may be for the best interest of the city. The 
order was passed under a suspension of the rules. 

Alderman Richards, from the Committee on Public 
Puildings reported the following order, which was 
read and laid upon the table : 

Ordered, That the Committee on Public Buildings 
be authorized to procure plans and estimates for a 
building to be erected on the lot of land belonging to 
the city, on Powker street; said building to contain 
accommodations for Engine Company No. 4, Engine 
Company No. 8, Hook and Ladder Company No. i, a 
Fuel Depot for the Fire Department, and an Armory 
for the National Lancers — the expense attending the 
same to be charged to the appropriation for Public 
Puildings. 

Alderman White, from the Committee on Licenses, 
reported the following order raising rates of hack 
fare. 



PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



9 



Ordered, That the prices or rates of fare to betaken 
by, or paid to, the owner, driver, or other person 
having charge of any hackney carriage, except om- 
nibuses, shall be as follows: 

For one passenger from one place to another with- 
in thai portion of the city north of Dover street and 
east of Berkeley street; or from one place to another 
within that portion of the city lying between Dover 
street, Berkeley street and Northampton street; or 
from one place to another within that portion of the 
city south of Northampton street; or from one place 
to another within the limits of South Boston or East 
Boston, the fare shall be seventy-five cents. 

And for each additional person fifty cents ma} r 
be charged. 

For one or two passengers from any part of the 
city proper north of Dover street and east of Berkeley 
street to Fast Boston or South Boston the fare 
shall be two dollars. 

And for each additional person more than two, 
fifty cents may be charged. 

For one or two passengers from any part of the 
city proper north of Dover street anil east of 
Berkeley street to any part of the city south of 
Northampton street, the fare shall be two dollars 
and titty cents. 

And for each additional person more than two, fifty 
cents may be charged. 

For one or two passengers from any part of the city 
proper south of Dover street, west of Berkeley street 
and north of Northampton street, to any part of the 
city south of Northampton street, the fare shall be one 
dollar and fifty cents. 

And for each additional person more than two, 
lifty cents may lie charged. 

For one or four passengers from any part of the 
city south of Dover street and west of Berkeley street, 
to Fast Boston the fare shall be three dollars. 

For one or four passengers from any part of the 
city south of Dover street and west of Berkeley street 
to South Boston the fare shall be two dollars. 

Children between four and twelve years of age, 
when accompanied by an adult, may be' charged half 
the above sums. Children under four years of age, 
accompanied by an adult, shall go free. 

Baggage— One trunk, valise, box, bundle, carpetbag, 
basket or other article used in travelling, shall be free 
of charge; but for each additional trunk, or other 
such articles, live cents may be charged. 

No owner, driver or other person having charge of 
a hackney carriage or hack shall demand or receive 
any more than the price or rate of fare herein estab- 
lished, under a penalty of not less than ten nor more 
than twenty dollars for each offence; aud he shall 
forfeit his license. 

Ordered, That the rates of fare established by the 
foregoing order shall go into effect on the first day 
of August. 1SU8. 

Ordered, That all orders or rules and regulations 
inconsistent with the foregoing orders are hereby 
repealed. 

Alderman Braman, from the Committee of Confer- 
ence on the part of the Board of Alderman on the 
subject of difference between the two branches rela- 
tive to the erection of a wooden meeting house on 
Broadway, South Boston, reported agreement in re- 
commending the Board of Aldermen to recede from 
their former action, and to concur in the passage of 
the order authorizing its erection. Report accepted, 
and the action of Council concurred in. 

PAPERS FROM THE COMMON COUNCIL. 

The order directing the Committee on Fourth of 
July to report the amount and character of the ex- 
penditures on that occasion, was laid upon the table 
npon motion of Aid. Messinger, who stated that $500 
in addition to the additional appropriation of $1500 
asked for would be necessary to meet all the expendi- 
tures of the day. 

The order to contract with Luther Robinson for the 
ventilation of the City Hall at an expense not exceed- 
ing $4000 was taken up, the question being upon con- 
curring with the other branch in its adoption. 

Alderman Richards desired that the matter should 
not drop entirely, if he could help it, but had not 
considered the matter to his own satisfaction. He 
moved to substitute an order which had been pre- 
viously reported to the City Government. [City Doc. 
59.] 

The Committee on Public Buildings had had no 
examination for some time, but after their exam- 
ination they had made a report of what they pro- 
posed to do. It was his belief that all that w r as 
desired could be done by the proper ventilation of 



the stairway hall. The gentleman's plan had been 
applied in the case of the Court House, and the 
Public Library, and the Normal School, and in all 
cases it had proved inefficient. 

Alderman Paul, though not prepared to say that 
the system now proposed was unmistakably the 
correct one, was opposed to a constant experi- 
menting. A member of the other branch who had 
examined this plan had come to the conclusion 
that it would not benefit the room occupied by 
that branch. There should be sufficient delay to 
obtain scientific knowledge enough to go to work 
understandingly, without constant experimenting. 

Alderman Braman read a communication from 
Mr. Luther Robinson, in which he stated that in 
the carrying out of his plans of ventilation there 
had been no real failures, although some of the 
first trials had not been as satisfactory as desirable. 
The proposition contained in the proposition of Mr. 
Robinson, as the Alderman understood it, was that 
that gentleman would do this work properly, or 
otherwise ask no compensation, but also replace 
the building as far as possible in the same condi- 
tion as before. 

After a few remarks further by Alderman Paul 
ami Alderman Richards, the subject was laid 
upon the table, upon motion of Alderman Talbot. 

The order for the construction of a grammar 
schoolhouse in Ward Nine, to cost $86,000, was 
passed without opposition. 

APPOINTMENTS. 

His Honor submitted the following appointments 
for the approval of the Board : 

For special police officers without pay, John B. 
Huff, at Springfield Hall, John Wright, between 
Boylston street and Fayette street. Approved. 

Also, for members of Hose Co. No. 8, Theodore 
James and Charles E. Wadleigh. 

Alderman Messinger presented a remonstrance 
by a majority of the members of Hose Co. No 8 
against the appointment of Charles E. Wadleigh, and 
moved that his nomination be laid upon the table, 
which was agreed to, and the remonstrance re- 
ferred to the Committee on the Fire Department. 

Walter S. Orrok as driver of Hose Carriage No. 
7. Chas. R. Classen as member of Hose Company 
No. 8. 

MARGINAL STREET RAILWAY. 

The order providing for taking certain property 
on Commercial street, commencing at Eastern av- 
enue, was taken up and read, notice having 
been duly given of a hearing upon the subject at 
the present meeting. 

Alderman Talbot remarked that inasmuch as there 
were present a number of gentlemen interested in 
this matter, it was desirable on the part of the 
Committee on Streets to hear all the objections to 
the action proposed, the objections not having 
been considered with entire fulness. 

Mr. Rand, representing the proprietors of Lewis 
wharf, appeared before the Board and desired to 
know from whom the petition came. 

Alderman Talbot stated that there was a large 
number of petitioners before the Committee at the 
time of the argument, supported by petitions from 
the Board of Trade and some 200 or 300 merchants 
of Boston. 

The petitions were submitted to the examination 
of the remonstrants, having been read by their 
titles. 

Mr. Welch, who appeared in behalf of the proprie- 
tors of Rowe's wharf, desired that Mr. Quincy, 
who was especially interested in the adoption of 
the project, should state what the arguments might 
be in its favor. 

Mr. Quincy answered that he had certainly no 
objections to make. No person could well fail of 
seeing the advantage of the project, enabling as it 
would all the railroads centering in the city to 
unite, and also bringing them to deep water. Ac- 
cording to the charter granted to Mr. Crane, this 
road must be laid through Commercial street, and 
it was therefore important to have these privi- 
leges. All the merchants of the city were in favor 
of it; and there were none to oppose it, with the 
exception of those whose property was to be taken 
to some extent. 

The only great advantage possessed by the city of 
Portland in the way of commerce lay in the fact that 
its railroad termini in the city were at the wharves of 
the city. The facility obtained simply by this was 
quite suggestive, in the view of the fact that at the 



10 



PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



present time large quantities of grain wore continually 
being sent here from that city. 

Mr. Welsh made inquiry as to whether the expense 
of the estates had been at all estimated in weighing 

this mailer. 

Alderman Talbot stated thai the committee under- 
stood that a careful investigation had been made 
either by Mr. Quincy, <>r under big direction, in 
detail) <>r the property to be taken. 

Mr. Quincy stated further that the betterments of 
the property would nearly cover the expense in- 
volved, while the additional taxable property would 
far more than pay the interest upon such expense. 
There was also furnished another opportunity owing 
to the position of Fort Hill, which could be levelled 
by this operation, making an amount Of taxable 
property which is now nearly valueless, and can be 
instantly brought into play, independent of the taxa- 
ble property which would be given by this increase. 

The estimate was that the space occupied by the 
Wharves on the east side of Eastern avenue would 
amount in value now to a dollar a loot; whereas 
upon carrying out the present project it would be 
worth three or tour dollars a foot, by reason of the 
railroad being put down upon them. The whole 
population at the northern portion of the city was 
in favor of this measure, while none but those owning 
the property anyways opposed it; and the probability 
was that they would' be glad to see it carried out. 

Alderman' Talbot stated that the Committee had 
made no estimate of the expense of the estates in 
question, as, if the question should be decided ad- 
versely at the present time, the expense of the inves- 
tigation wouldbe left upon the city. 

Mr. William 8. Dexter, representing the propri- 
etors of T wharf, stated that there was a serious 
objection which would be involved in the settlement 
of titles to the flats of which that wharf occupied a 
part if this project were carried out. The owners of 
these wharves could not estimate their damages, 
because they could not estimate how much would be 
converted into land. They would propose that the 
titles to these lands should first be settled. If they 
were not, it would involve a great deal of litigation 
and large expense; and they did not desire that 
experience. Futhermore the city had made a contract 
at one time that these flats should always be left 
open. 

His Honor announced the receipt of two remon- 
strances—one on the part of the proprietors of T 
wharf, and the other on the part of George \\ r . Pratt 
and the heirs of the late Luther Ellis. 

Mr. Rand, in behalf of the proprietors of Lewis 
wharf, claimed that that property would be very 
seriously injured. From the reading of the differ- 
ent petition's, which were substantially the same, 
it seemed that this project was claimed, "not for the 
benefit of the city of Boston, but for the benefit of 
certain railroad operations. The proprietors of 
Lewis wharf objected to this, because it injured their 
property and took from them a large number of 
stores, fete whole of four, part of a fifth, and a small 
portion of a sixth, and these some of the most valua- 
ble stoics on Commercial street, and it offered them 
no compensation except an award for damages. 

Alderman Talbot inquired if the proprietors of 
Lewis wharf had not appeared before the assessors 
and asked an abatement of taxes, within a recent 
period, at the then valuation. 

Mr. Rand remarked that as that was a somewhat 
usual thing to ask of the assessors, it was quite likely 
to have been the fact. 

The order was recommitted to the Committee on 
Streets. 

LOCATION OF NORMAL SCHOOL BUILDING. 

The following orders, reported by the Committee 
on Public Institutions were taken from the table and 
considered. 

Ordered. That the Committee on Public buildings 
be requested to purchase the land lying between 
Newton and Pembroke Streets, owned by George A. 
Simmons containing twenty-six thousand seven hun- 
dred square feet, more or less, for a sum not exceed- 
ing one dollar eighty-seven and a half cents per 
square foot.— said land to be used for school purposes. 

Ordered— That the Treasurer be authorized to bor- 
row, under the direction of the Committee on Finance, 
a sum not exceeding fifty-one thousand dollars, to be 
applied to the purchase of land between Newton and 
Pembroke streets, for school purposes. 

Ordered— That the Committee on Public Buildings 
he requested to procure plans and estimates for a 
building for the Girls' High and Normal School, to be 



erected on New ton street; said plans to be approved 
by the Committee on Public Instruction, and report- 
ed, with the estimate-, to the City Council, — the ex. 
pense Of procuring the same to be charged to the 
appropriation for Grammar School — Public Build- 
ings. 

Alderman Braman said that, although believing in 
the necessity of a Normal School, and although this 
land, as it was known, could be bought cheap, he did 
not judge that the wants of the city of Boston war- 
ranted carrying the Normal School building, quite so 
far south as' the committee proposed; and especially 
in consideration of the tact of there being a flourishing 
Normal School in the Koxbury District, which it 
would hardly be proposed to give up. He hoped 
the committee would be able to lind some more suit- 
able locality. 

Alderman Pratt, though deeming it hardly probable 
to change what seemed to be a foregone conclusion in 
this matter, beleived that a great injustice would be 
done by disposing Of this location in such a way as to 
cut oil' any means of access, on the part of the poorer 
classes, to the opportunities afforded by this school 
for obtaining a superior education. The elevation 
and cultivation of this class was of the utmost impor- 
tance. It would much more accord with such a poli- 
cy to locate this building somewhere at the northern 
portion of the city. By this action a very large por- 
tion of the poor would' be deprived of an opportunity 
of attendance bv reason of the distance and expense. 
It was to be hoped that the subject be thoroughly con- 
sidered before being- acted upon. 

Alderman White stateil that the committee had at 
one time and another, spent considerable time in con- 
sidering this subject, and examining different locali- 
ties; and they had consulted some of the most influ- 
ential builders, in whose opinion this lot of land, at $2 
per foot, was cheaper than any that could be bought 
upon the Back Bay at $1 50. There was no doubt but 
that in the course of a few years such a schoolhouse 
would be required at the" North End. The city of 
Charlestown would no doubt be annexed in time, and 
then it would surely be required. 

Alderman Pratt acknowledged that he had once 
thought the best location to be near Berkeley street 
and Columbus avenue, but after further consideration 
believed that a more northerly location was the best, 
and could not without injustice be avoided. This 
school was largely attended by young ladies fitting 
themselves for teachers. By this location he judged 
that the city would be likely to deprive itself of a re- 
source in tliis respect. 

Alderman Paul thought it was quite evident that 
any change from the present location (one reason of 
which was to get away from business in a locality 
which was giving way to stores) would be inconsist- 
ent, if that removal was to a locality from which there 
would have to be a second removal in a short time for 
the very same reason; and this would be the case in 
locating at the North End. About the present location 
were broad streets and plenty of space for air, very 
important facts to be considered. 

Alderman White stated that this was the last week 
which the owner of the property was willing to leave 
to the city government to determine their action in 
purchasing. 

Alderman Seaver claimed that the location proposed 
by the committee would entirely discommode the 
people of East Boston. 

Alderman Messinger remarked that at a former 
consideration of this matter, representatives of East 
Boston upon the School Committee were entirely in 
favor of a location upon Berkeley and Newbury 
streets; and it would seem that they would be quite 
as well accommodated by the locality proposed. This 
matter was one upon winch he had no feeling what- 
ever; and he regarded the interests of the poor as 
much as any one could, representing as he did a large 
number of them himself. 

Aldermen Talbot wished to know whether there 
was any doubt as to the need of a new building. It 
seemed' very proper to be very cautious in the pro- 
jects for destroying a good schoolhouse for the sake 
of one a little better in' its outside appearance. 

Alderman White was of the opinion that so far as 
concerned the attendance of young ladies tilting them- 
selves for teachers, the choice of the North End would 
hardly suggest itself. 

Alderman Richards judged that there could have 
been no doubt on the part of those present that there 
ought at all events to be a change from the present 
location. From the surroundings it seemed that 
there could be no hesitation. 



PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



11 



Alderman Talbot suggested that if the location had 
been so bad for three years, during which time the 
committee had been considering the subject they 
would have agreed upon some location before this. 

It was then voted to adopt the orders, as fol- 
lows : 

Yeas— Aldermen Cobb, Fairbanks, James, Mes- 
singer, Paul, Richards, Talbot, White— 8. 

Nays — Br.nnan, Pratt, Seavcr— 3. 

Alderman Pratt then offered a resolution provid- 
ing for furnishing the school children of the six 
northern districts with means of transportation free 
in there attendance upon this school, under the new 
location. 

On motion of Aid. Messinger, the resolve was laid 
upon the table. 

The Board then adjourned to Mondav next, at 4 
o'clock, P. M. 



Proceedings of the Common Council, 



JULY SO, 1808. 



A special meeting ot the Common Council was 
held at 4 o'clock, this afternoon, ('has. H. Allen, 
the President, in the chair. The President stated 
that the meeting was called by the Mayor, and the 
call was read, designed for the purpose of acting 
upon the widening of Tremont street, anil upon 
such other business as may come before the Coun- 
cil. 

COMMUNICATIONS. 

A communication was read from Jonas Fitch, 
President of the Massachusetts Charitable Mechanic 
Association, with a request for a renewal of the 
lease of the Quincv Hall to said Association. Re- 
ferred to Committee on Public Buildings. 

The communication from the Water Power Com- 
pany, offering to exchange any land they have for 
the city's strip on the east side of Northampton 
street, was referred, in concurrence. 

ORDERS PASSED IN CONCURRENCE. 

Order for the erection of a shed at the west city 
Stables, and repairs on city stables at Boston High- 
lands. 

Order for Committee on Public Buildings to take 
charge of erection of music stands hereafter required 
for the use of the city, and have the care of those 
already on the public' grounds. 

Order authorizing Committee on Laying Out ami 
Widening Streets to sell at auction buildings pro- 
jecting over the line of widening of Federal street, 
between Summer and First streets, after the 15th 
of August next. 

Order authorizing same Committee to sell at auc- 
tion buildings projecting over the line of widening 
of Tremont street, between Boylston and Jefferson 
streets, after the first of said month. 

Report and orders in printed City Document No. 
91, 186s, for the purchase of a lot of land between 
Newton and Pembroke streets for school purposes: 
authorizing a loan of $51,000 to pay therefor; and 
authorizing plans and estimates to be procured for 
a building for a Girls' High and Normal School, 
to be erected on Newton street, said plan to be 
approved by Committee on Public Instruction. 

The order's were passed under a suspension of the 
rules, by the requisite vote, including the Presi- 
dent— yeas 40; nays 1. Mr. Jenks of Ward Three. 

Report and orders in printed City Document No. 
95, authorizing the Commtttee on Paving to ar- 
range with abutters on Shawraut avenue and Rug- 
bies street for the raising of their houses to the 
established grade, and for settlement of grade dam- 
ages; and authorizing a loan of $25, 001), to be appro- 
priated for raising and grading said avenue and 
street. Passed bv a vote of 41 yeas; no nays. 



UNFINISHED BUSINESS — ORDERS PASSED. 

Order authorizing alterations and repairs on Police 
Stations Nos. 3 and 4. 

Order authorizing $23,000 to be transferred from 
the reserved fund to the Fire Department, on ac- 
count of the increase of the salaries of the mem- 
bers of said department 

The order authorizing the repairing and dredging 
of the slips and drops formerly occupied by the 
People's Ferry Company was considered as unfin- 
ished business. 

Mr. Newton of Ward Nine stated that the subject 
had been up before, and the work proposed must lie 
done absolutely. The city hail pledged itself to the 
Fast Boston Ferry Company that if they would run 
boats from these slips, the city would put them in 
oider. 11 would be necessary to dredge, and this 
appropriation was required for the completion of the 
work. The order was lost by a vote of 37 yeas to 4 
nays, Mr. Newton changing his vote to nay for the 
purpose of reconsideration. 

At a subsequent stage of the proceedings of the 
Council, Mr. Newton moved a reconsideration, which 
was carried, when the order was passed by a vote of 
4o yeas: nays none. 

FOURTH OF JULY APPROPRIATION. 

The order to add $1.~>00 to the appropriation for the 
celebration of the Fourth of July inst.. to be charged 
to incidental expenses, was considered. 

Mr. Jenks of Ward Three opposed the passage of 
this order. The appropriation for the celebration 
was large, and there was no use for the additional 
sum and no purpose for which so much money could 
have been put. 

Mr. Wright of Ward Twelve, was glad that the sub. 
ject had come up. A communication had been re- 
ceived by him from the chairman of the committee, 
with a request for an additional sum. From bills 
received and others outstanding it would be necessa- 
ry to make the amount asked for $2000. He therefore 
moved to amend by making it $2000, which was 
adopted. 

Mr. Wright said he would take the orportunity to 
say that while the Council passed the order to require 
the committee to report in detail the expeditures and 
by whom authorized, the other branch had laid the 
order on the table. The bills can all be seen at the 
Auditor's office, and any gentleman who wishes can 
ascertain what they are and how the money has been 
spent. There is cause to regret that the appropria- 
tion was overrun, yet it was not strange that it should 
be in a committee of 43 members. In so large a com- 
mittee it would be likely that the appropriation would 
be overrun, in some instances, and something would 
be learned in future, not to have such large commit- 
tees. The city was, however, responsible for the 
expenditures and must pay the bills. 

Mr. Jenks said it was not enough that the members 
of the Council could go to the Auditor's office and see 
these bills; an exhibit should be made, so that the 
public can see and know how the money is expended. 

Mr. Wadsworth of Ward Four said the Council 
ought to have an exhibit of these expenditures, espec- 
ially if it be true, as he had heard from responsible 
persons, that money was paid to private parties to 
enable them to entertain their friends. He should 
vote against the appropriation until he had an exhibit 
of the expenditures. 

Mr. Jenks moved the yeas and nays on the passage 
of the order. 

Mr. Carney of Ward 2 moved to lav the order on the 
table. Lost, 10 to 19. 

The motion of .Mr. Jenks for the yeas and nays was 
carried. 

Mr. Harris of Ward Eleven thought the appropria- 
tion was large, but inasmuch as the money had been 
expended, the Council could do no less than make 
the additional appropriation asked for. 

Mr. Keith of Ward Fifteen, said he should vote 
against the appropriation, ami as reasons stated that 
after several conferences the committee determined 
upon the amount to be expended and after the liberal 
appropriation, many of the sub-committees had ex- 
ceeded their authority and instructions. There was 
no other way of teaching gentlemen their obligations 
to the city and to the law but to require that when 
they exceed those obligations they do so at their per- 
il and must pay the amount out of their own pockets. 
There was nothing more destructive to the city and 
its interests, nothing more destructive to honor than to 
permit such violations of obligations, and he knew of 
no better plan than that unauthorized and illegal ex- 
penditures should be paid by those who made them. 



12 



rROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



Hi- would aever consent to pay such expenditures. 

Mr. Rockwell of Ward Ten said he suppossed he 
should vote for this order, although he « 1 i • 1 oot like 
the manner of overruning the appropriations. It 
would be Impracticable b> carry out the plan of mak- 
ing tin' members pay for such expedituree out oftheir 
own pockets. He would renew the motion to lay the 
order on the table. Carried, 18 to i">. 

WIDENING OF THEMONT STREET. 

Mr. Bryden of Ward Eight, from the Committee to 
Whom was referred the report and orders in relation 
to the widening ofTremoni street, submitted a report, 
concluding that the same ought to pass. 

The Chair read some of the reasons given in the re- 
port, which led to the change in the plan for widening 
the street, but before concluding, 

Mr. Parker of Ward Fourteen stated that the Chair- 
man of the Committee on Streets on the part of the 
Hoard of Aldermen, desired the rejection of the report 
and the order, as the committee hail been unable to 
complete the negotiation with regard to the Hotel 
Pelham, as Dr. Dix demanded an additional $10,000 
for prospective loss in rents in moving that structure. 

On motion of Mr. Carney of Ward Two, the con- 
sideration of the report was indefinitely postponed. 

Mr. Rockwell of Ward 10, moved that when the 
Council adjourn, it be to Thursday evening next. 

Mr. Keith of Ward 15, rose to a question of order 
whether such a motion could be entertained, so long 
as this was merely a special meeting and the Council 
had voted to adjourn to the last of September. 

The Chair ruled that as a special meeting, the 
Council could adjourn before the business was con- 
cluded, to finish it at some other time. 

Mr. Keith inquired whether there was more busi- 
ness requiring action, and if so, he believed it would 
be better to dispose of it before adjournment. 

The Chair said there were some matters to be 
acted upon, and the motion could be put at a proper 
time. 

REPORTS OP COMMITTEES. 

Mr. Osborn of Ward Six submitted a report on 
a request of the School Committee, in relation to 
alterations in the Comins Schoolhouse, with an order 
authorizing the procuring of plans and specifications 
for such alterations, to be reported to the City Council. 
The rules were suspended and the order was passed. 

Mr. Woolley of Ward One, offered an order that the 
Committee on public buildings be and they are hereby 
authorized the expend, in addition to the sum hereto- 
fore appropriated, a sum not exceding $929, for the 
completion and furnishing of the bathing-house on 
Cabot street, Boston Highlands. 

In answer to an inquiry Mr. Woolley said the order 
did not call for more money to do the work first de- 
signed, but to take the money from the general appro- 
priation for bathing. 

Mr. Jenks of Ward Three wished to know if the 
work in the construction of this bathing house was 
not unskilfully done, and, if so, who was in fault? 

Mr. Wolley replied that there was a defect in the 
work, causing a Blight sinking of the floor, from a 
miscalculation of the weight of the water; but this 
appropriation had no reference to that. 

Mr. Morse of Ward 13 said if any portion of this 
appropriation went to that contractor he should be 
opposed to it. 

Mr. Woolley replied that no part of it went to the 
contractor except for stones and alterations, while 
most of it was for expenditures not provided for in 
the original appropriation. 

The order was passed. 

On motion of Mr. Jacobs of Ward Five, city doc- 
ument No. 93 was taken from the table, it being the 
report in detail of the Committee on Common and 
Public Squares. 

Mr. Van Nostrandof Ward Twelve hoped the report 
would be acted upon and the additional amount asked 
for would be granted. 

Mr. Wadsworth of Ward Four said that although 
the document was on tile, he bad not seeu it until this 
moment and would like lo have an opportunity to look 
over it. He moved to lay the report and order on the 
table. I,i. st. 

The report was accepted. 

The order as reported by the committee in document 
No 90, was read as follows: 

Ordered, That the sum of eleven thousand two 
hundred and seventy-live dollars be transferred from 
the Reserved Fund to the appopriation for Common 
and Public Squares. 

Mr. Carney of Ward Two hoped the order would 



pass. If it was intended to keep the Common and 
sqiiaies in any kind of order, the appropriation should 
be made. There had been a great amount Of sodding 
done, which for want of care had been burnt up by 
the hot weather, for there was now not a man at 
work. 

Mr. Wright of Ward Twelve suggested that the 
matter be laid on the table, and a motion to that effect 
Was carried. 

Mr. Wright of Ward Twelve moved to tike Horn the 
table the report and order to authorize the introduc- 
tion of Oilman Joslin's Rotary Elevator into the City 
Hall, printed City Document No. 94, 1868. Carried. 

Sir. Wright said he wished to put in an offer of Otis 
Tufts for the construction of one of his elevators, and 
moved to recommit the report to the Committee on 
Public Buildings. Carried. 

OKIIERS INTRODUCED. 

Mr. AVells of Ward Three offered an order that the 
Committee on Public Buildings procure plans ami 
estimates for a building for Hose House No. :S, to be 
located on the city lands on North Grove street. 

In explanation," Mr. Wells said that the present hose 
house was on leased land, and required much expense 
to keep it in repair. 

On motion of Mr. Wadsworth of Ward Four, it was 
referred to Committee on the Fire Department. 

Mr. Ryan of Ward Thirteen offered an order that 
the Committee on Public Buildings be authorized to 
erect a Police Station and Ward Room in Ward Thir- 
teen, at a expense not exceeding $40,000, and that the 
Treasurer borrow the money therefor. Ordered to a 
second reading. 

Adjourned. 



Proceedings of Board of Aldermen, 

AUGUST 3, 1868. 



The regular weekly meeting of the Board of Alder- 
men was held this ' afternoon at 4 o'clock, Mayor 
Shurtleff presiding. 

Petitions from the Common Council were referred, 
in concurrence. 

ORDERS PASSED IN CONCURRENCE. 

Order for Committee on Public Buildings to obtain 
plans and specifications for repairs on Comins School- 
bouse. 

Order to make repairs on Police Stations 3 and 4. 

Order to appropriate $3000 for dredging ferry Blips. 

Order to appropriate $950 for completing Highlands 
Bath House. 

( )rder to select a site near the Post-Office for a Ward 
Room for Ward Fourteen, and Hook and Ladder 
House No. 4. 

Order to recommit a report on the furnishing of an 
elevator at the City Hall, with the proposal of Otis 
Tufts. 

PETITIONS PRESENTED AND REFERRED. 

Win. McCorkle and others, for a sewer in Orange 
court; Franklin Hedge and others, that gas lamps lie 
placed and lighted on Seventh street, from K to L 
streets; coal dealers that their scales may be sealed 
and adjusted on United States standards;" Josiah P. 
Menduin and others, that Knowlton street be laid out 
as a public highway ; Thomas D. Kendrick and others, 
against a wooden stable now in process of erection on 
Lenox street; Mrs. C. Todd and others, that Cold 
street, between B and C streets, be accepted; of Na- 
thaniel McKay and others, that the gutters and side- 
walks on Trenton street, from Meridian to Putnam 
streets, be completed ; of William Woolley and others, 
for the removal of bones and decayed matter from a 
lot on Eagle street ; remonstrance of S. C. Field and 
others, against allowing any bone manure factory to 
be erected in Ward One; of the employes of the 
Health Department for increase of pay. 



PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



13 



NOTICES OF INTENTION'S TO BUILD. 

Benjamin II. Flanders, corner of Washington and 
Decatur streets; Mark Dowling, Athens street, be- 
tween C and I) streets; Patrick Carroll, 631 Harrison 
avenue; Thomas K. Daunt, Broadway, between A 
and 15 streets; J. P. Power, Tuckerman street; Z. C. 
McFadden, Tuckerman street; S. J. & G. Tuttle, cor- 
ner of C and Third streets; John VVoolley. 34 Saluta- 
tion street; Win. M. Shute & Co., 173 and 175 Wash- 
ington street; G. W. Sargent, Tudor, between E and 
F streets ; Thomas Dooley, Federal street ; Burrill & 
Whitney, corner of Broadway and II streets; Alonzo 
Warren', Tudor, between E and F streets; Mark 
Morse, Fourth street, between C and D streets; W. 
L. Lewis, Vinton street. 

MARGINAL STREET FREIGHT RAILROAD. 

\ communication was received from the Directors 
of the Marginal street Freight Railroad Company, 
stating "that it is ready to commence the construction 

of its railway through the streets of Boston mentioned 
in the act of incorporation, in such manner as the 
Board of Aldermen may prescribe, and that it desires 
to commence the work in Causeway street, near the 
Gas Works, and to lay the track each way from that 
point, laying one track at a time. Said Company, 
therefore', requests that such orders may be passed as 
may be necessary to enable it to proceed with the 
work without delay." Referred to the Committee on 
Paving. 

APPOINTMENTS. 

Amos G. Drake, special oilicer without pay on cer- 
tain wharves. 

Sergeant Joseph H. Park to be Lieutenant of Po- 
lice. 

J. C. Crofts, F. II. Hathaway, weighers of coal. 

Levi D. Heyward, special officer without pay, for 
duty at Scollay'S Building, 

Warren Kimball and J. M. Sargent, special police 
officers without pay, for duty at the Church Street 
Territory. 

Thomas Kenuey, special police officer without pay, 
for duty as superintendent of the Sanitary Police 
Station, Boston Common. 

QUARTERLY REPORTS. 

Overseers of the Poor. Receipts — cash on hand May 
1, 1808, $502i 30; drafts on City Treasurer, $15,000; 
cash from cities and towns, $392 63; for support of 
a pauper, refunded by a relative, $5-1. Total, $20,407 92. 

Expenditures— Burials, $053 37; paid to cities and 
towns for relief of Boston Poor, $381 40; Temporary 
Home, $2209 34; pensions and grants at office, $3452"; 
immediate relief of persons having no settlement, 
$154; coal, $392; groceries, $3423; salary of Secretary, 
$500; bookkeeper. $375; do. clerks, $137 50; do. visitors. 
$900; office expenses, $79 80; transportation, $1S7(>; 
account of Yarmouth iin d charged, $42 12; — total, 
$12,718 29; City Treasurer, receipts from cities and 
towns, $4098 74; cash balance, $3050 89. 

City Registrar. Issued during the quarter 826 cer- 
tificates of intention of marriage, for which he re- 
ceived $413, which has been paid into the Citj* 
Treasury. 

City Clerk. The City Clerk reported that for the 
quarter ending July 81, 1808, he has received the 
following sums : 
For recording mortgages and liens on personal 

property, assignments, etc $472 03 

For licenses of billiard saloons 017 00 

Intelligence offices 30 00 

Auctioneers 36 00 

Total $1155 03 

All of which has been paid to the City Treasurer. 
Superintendent of Funeuil Hall Market. The Su- 
perintendent of Faneuil Hall Market reported that 
during the quarter ending the 31st ult., he received 
for rent of stills, $10,300 50; rent of cellars, $.>280; 
outside stands, $498 70; fees for weighing at market 
scales, $72; rent of stalls in new market, $3030; cel- 
lars in new market, $1402 50; cash from occupants 
for coal, $338; for tree stand, $24; total, $21,017 75. 

ORDERS OF NOTICE. 
In relation to the construction of a common sewer 
in Mt. Pleasant avenue and in Forest street (hear- 
ing 34th August) ; also in Warren street(same date) : 
also for rebuilding sewer in Beacon street (same date) ; 
notifying Susan II. Todd, Willard Phillips and others 
of intention to widen High street on the southerly 
side, from No. 33 to Summer street and on the 
northerly side between Federal and Summer streets 



(hearing, same date) ; also of intention to assess 
betterment on Bowker street. 

That due notice be given to the proprietors of the 
Second Church, Eben D. Jordan and Charles Marsh, 
Mrs. Elizabeth A. dishing, wife of Thomas Cushing, 
George Gardner and all other parties interested, 
that this Board intend to lay out and extend Avon 
place, by taking a portion (If their land and laying 
out the same as a public street, and that Monday, 
the 24th day of August, at four o'clock, be assigned 
as the time for hearing any objections to such action. 

REPORTS OF COMMITTEE. 

Alderman Talbot, from the Committee on Streets, 
reported leave to withdraw on the petition of Wil- 
liam II. Hill, for leave to purchase the land at the 
corner of Washington and Water streets, belonging 
to the city; the same committee reported leave to 
withdraw" on the petition of J. H. Hathorne, that 
th<' city would purchase a strip of land in Lenox 
street, Dow embraced in the highway. The reports 
were accepted 

The same committee reported reference to Com- 
mittee on Public Lands on petition for a passageway 
in rear of reserved lot in West Canton street. Ac- 
cepted. 

Alderman Talbot, from the Committee on the As- 
sessors' Department, on the petition of Joshua C. 
Bates, for abatement of tax assessed upon him in 
1807, recommended the passage of the following order, 
which was adopted. 

Ordered, That there be abated on the tax assessed 
upon Joshua C. Bates, in 1807, the sum of $54 25. 

The same committee reported an order on the pe- 
tition of H. Farnuin & Company for an abatement of 
tax assessed on their personal property in 1807, that 
there be abated on the personal tax assessed on this 
company $217. The order was adopted. 

The same committee, on the petition of John Ander- 
son and others, of the Southern District, for an abate- 
ment of taxes in I860, reported as the opinion of City 
Solicitor, that they had no authority to make such an 
abatement, and tliey therefore reported leave to with- 
draw. Accepted. 

The same committee reported an order on petition 
of Thos. M. Hayes for an abatement of tax for 1807, 
an order abating the same $156 24. Adopted. 

The same committee, on the petition of the incorpo- 
rators and managers of the St. Joseph's Home report- 
ed the following order, which was passed: 

Ordered, That the tax assessed upon Richard S. Fay 
in 1807. for the estate numbered 6 East Brookliue 
street, amounting to $175, and also the tax assessed 
upon II. Sidney Everett in 1867, for the estate num- 
bered 8 East Brookliue street, amounting to $175 be 
and the same are hereby abated. 

Aldermen Richards, from the Committee on the 
Fire Department, to whom was referred the remon- 
strance of certain hosemen of Engine Company No. 4, 
against the admission of Charles E. Wadleigh as a 
member of said Company, reported that having heard 
all parties interested, the remonstrants have leave to 
withdraw, and Mr. Wadleigh be confirmed. Report 
accepted and nomination confirmed. 

Alderman Braman, from the Committee on Lamps, 
reported leave to withdraw on petition of Joseph W. 
Tucker for additional lamps ou Norfolk street. Re- 
port accepted. 

Alderman Messinger, from the Committee on 
Health reported on the petition of Haues & Hersey, 
for abatement of a nuisance on Second street, between 
E and F streets, that as measures have been taken 
to abate this nuisance, no further action is necessary. 
Report accepted. 

Alderman Fairbanks, from the Committee on Steam 
Engines, on the petition of John Cummings and 
others for abatement of a nuisance caused by smoke, 
&c, at Ingolls and Talbot's brass foundry, reported 
that no further action is necessary on the part of this 
board. The report was accepted. 

ORDERS ADOPTED. 

Order that a parcel of land belonging to Charles H. 
Bacon, on Harrison avenue, be taken and laid out as 
a public street; also an order for the payment of the 
same. 

Older that there be paid to L. M. Phillips $8883 for 
land taken to widen Tremont street, and the same be 
charged to the Tremont street Loan. 

Order that the Superintendent of Streets be author- 
ized to repave the gutters and sidewalks, ami reset the 
edgestones upon Worcester street, between Shawmut 
avenue ami Tremont street; also to gravel the road- 
way of said street. 



14r 



J'ROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



order that the Chief of Police direct the abutt ts In 
Warren street to furnish edgestones for the sidewalks 

in said street. 

order that the Chief of Police he directed to notify 
the owners and abutters <>n Devonshire street, be- 
tween Milk and Water streets, to furnish new cdge- 
Btones for the sideww ks. 

( trder that the Superintendent of Sewers be author- 
ized to construct a sewer on Kustis street between 
Washington street and Harrison avenue, and report 
a schedule of the cost to this Board. 

Order to pay .Jesse Tirrell $11,000 for land and dam- 
ages in the Widening of Federal street. 

Order to pay Mary 8. T. Macomber $7500 for land 
and damages in the widening of Federal street. 

Order to pay F. H. Bradlee $20,000 for land and 
damages in widening Temple place. 

oriler authorizing the Committee on streets to sell 
buildings projecting over the line of High street, as 
widened by resolve of July 16, lMil". 

Order that there be paid to Mary Frost $19,000 for 
the estate on Tremont street, purchased by authority 
of an order of the City Council, passed July is, 1868, 
and the same be charged to the Tremont Loan. 

Order that there he paid to Leonard Hyde $t;.">0 for 
land taken to widen Day street (formerly Cross St.), 
by a resolve passed July 1<S, 1868 and that the same he 
charged to the appropriation for laying out and 
widening streets. 

Order that the Board adopt and establish the re- 
vised grades of Devonshire and Water streets, as 
shown on three plans drawn by the City Surveyor, 
approved by the Committee on Paving and dated 
July 29, 1868. 

Order that the Superintendent ot Streets be au- 
thorized to grade and pave Devonshire and Water 
streets, in accordance with the revised grade of said 
streets, at an estimated cost of $7000. 

Order that the Committee on Laying out and 
Widening Streets be and they are hereby authorized 
to sell, by public auction or "otherwise, the portions 
of the estates belonging to the city on Tremont and 
Federal steets, left from the estates purchased or 
surrendered to the city after the widening of said 

Order that the Committee on the Fire Department 
lie requested to obtain from the Board of Engineers of 
the Fire Department a report of the number of wooden 
buildings which have been erected contrary to law in 
fie different sections of the city, since the first of 
January last, and whether auy such buildings are 
now in process of erection. 

Order that the Superintendent of Streets be author- 
ized to remove the tree in the sidewalk in front of No. 
4ii Mount Pleasant avenue, said tree being an ob- 
struction to public travel. 

Order that His Honor the Mayor be requested to 
petition the next legislature for the passage of an act 
to prevent the erection in this city of any stable, either 
public or private, in which any horse, cow, or other 
animal, is to be placed, without the previous consent 
of the Board of Health therefor. Rassed and sent 
down for concurrence. 

Order that the Superintendent of Public Buildings, 
and Aldermen Richards, James, and Seaver, on be- 
half of this Hoard, acting as County Commissioners, 
be and they are hereby authorized to convert the old 
Roxbury Common Council Chamber into a court-room 
for the Municipal Court for the Southern District, and 
the present court-room into a private office for the 
Judge's clerk, at an expense not exceeding $800, which 
sum (to be charged to the County of Suffolk) does not 
exceed, in addition to all other amounts expended on 
said courtroom during this municipal year, the sum 
Of $5000. 

A communication was submitted with the above 
from the Judge of the Municipal Court of the South- 
ern District, in which it was stated that the Board of 
Aldermen could make the alterations required at an 
expense not exceeding $-200. A doubt was expressed 
by him that the Court would be abolished in two 
years, ami it was stated that the tines received paid 
all the expenses of the Court. 

HACK FARES. 

On motion of Alderman White, the order to establish 
hack fares in this city was taken from the table. 

Alderman White addressed the Chairman as fol 
lows : 

Mr. Mayor— I move to take from the table the 
orders reported by the Committee on Licenses at the 
last meeting, in relation to hack fares. 1 propose to 
have them recommitted, but before making the motion 
I desire to say a few words. During the past three 



years the Stablekeepers have repeatedly urged the 
Committee on Licenses to increase the rates of fare 
for hacks and hackney coaches. It Is notorious that 

the present rates are not adhered to. By some Stable- 
keepers the orders of the Board of Aldermen are 
utterly disregarded anil by others they are evaded. 
The invariable excuse is that the present rates won't 
pay. It appeared to the committee that if they wished 
to retain the control of these conveyances it was 
necessary to come to some under.-tanding with the 
owners. They invited the stable-keepers a number of 
times to meet them, and the representatives of a cer- 
tain number (lid meet them, and finally submitted a 
proposition in writing. 

A large proportion of the hack business is confined 
to the district north of Dover street— that is, between 
the railway stations ami the principal hotels. Now, by 
the proposition submitted to the Committee a single 
person would he obliged to pay one dollar to be taken 
anywhere within this district. The recommendation 
of the Committee was that the hack fare should be 75 
Cents for one person within this district. 

Since the introduction of these orders, a week ago, 
the committee have been informed, in various ways. 
that the stable keepers were very unhappy on account 
of the proposition to increase their pay. If we may 
believe the newspapers they are perfectly satisfied 
with the present rates. Very well. The Committee 
on Licenses have no desire to" insist on their taking 
75 instead of 50 cents; but I think they will insist 
now, that the present rates shall be strictly adhered 
to. I have only to say that these benevolent gentlemen 
— owners and' drivers of hacks — must, perform their 
duties hereafter according to the rules and regula- 
tions of the Board of Aldermen, or they will be de- 
prived of their licenses. The excuse that the present 
rates do not pay will not avail further. I move that the 
orders be recommitted to the Committee on Licenses. 

Alderman Messinger, as a member of the committee, 
said he never assented to the report, and did not 
understand that it had been agreed to. He was per- 
fectly willing that it should be recommitted, and 
would have made a minority report if it was to be 
acted upon as the report of "the committee. 

Alderman White. The committee was called togeth- 
er for the consideration of the report, when the gentle- 
man said he had an engagement and would agree 
to anything which the committee determined upon. 

Alderman Messinger denied that he made such an 
agreement. 

Alderman Pratt said lie hoped, in justice to the 
chairman of the committee, whose position had been 
so misunderstood, that his views and statements 
would be fully reported. 

Alderman Richards spoke of the report as crude, 
and that instead of recommitting it, it should lie 
killed. He should vote against it. 

Alderman White gave as reasons for recommittal, 
that Mr. Marsh, the Superintendent, said it was im- 
possible to grant licenses until the rates of fare for 
the Highlands were fixed, so that it should be accept- 
able to the hack owners and the public. 

Alderman Cobb said he would suggest that as the 
people of the Highlands had waited six months, it 
would be but little inconvenience to wait a while lon- 
ger. Let this be killed and a new order be reported 
for the lixing of those rates. 

Alderman White said it was a sufficent answer to 
the gentleman to say that at two meetings for the 
hearing on the rates of fares at the Highlands, not a 
man came. At the third meeting one man came from 
that district. Three whole afternoons were devoted 
to the matter, and no one had a right to blame the 
Committee for their action. 

The motion to recommit was lost by a vote oft to 6. 

Alderman Messinger moved its Indefinite postpone- 
ment, which was carried- 

Adjourned to Monday, Aug. 21. 



PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



15 



Proceedings of the Common Council, 



AUG. 6, 1868. 



A special meeting' of the Common Council was 
held this afternoon, at 4 o'clock, President A) leu in the 
chair. 

The President read a communication from Mayor 
Shurtleff, calling the Council together for action upon 
urgent business, specifying the subject of the widen- 
ing of Tremont street, "with such other business as 
may require attention. 

Petitions from the hoard of Aldermen were referred 
in concurrence. 

Quarterly reports from various departments, which 
came from the Board, were received and placed on 
tile. 

The order requesting the Mayor to petition the Leg- 
islature lor an act to prevent the erection of stables 
in the city without the consent of the Board of Health 
was referred to the Committee on Ordinances. 
AUDITOR'S MONTHLY EXHIBIT. 

The monthly exhibit of the Auditor of Accounts, 
which was submitted in print, showed the following 
result in the expenditures of general and special 
appropriations from the commencement of the pres- 
ent financial year to August 1, with the amount re- 
maining unexpended : 

Appropriations. 
Revenue, etc. Expended. Unexpended. 
General . . . $7,098,050 87 $1,S(>(),720 47 $5,237,330 40 
Special 2,552,788 06 547,(533 81 2,005,134 25 



(9,650,838 98 $2,408,374 28 $7,242,4154 65 

Mr. Harris of Ward Eleven submitted to the Council 
the Eleventh Annual Report of the Board of Directors 
of Public Institutions. Ordered to be sent up. 
WIDENING OF TUEMONT STREET. 

Mr. Bryden of Ward Eight moved a reconsideration 
of the vote by which at the last session of the Council 
the report on the widening of Tremont street on the 
westerly side was indetinitly postponed. 

Mr. wadsworth of Ward Four doubted the compe- 
tency of a reconsideration of an indefinite pospone- 
ment, that being a motion to quash a proposition en- 
tirely, and cited Cushing's Manual to sustain his 
position. For that reason he took exception to the 
motion. 

Mr. Rockwell of Ward Ten thought the point of or- 
der not well taken, the language of the Manual read 
by him simply being on the disposal of a proposition 
subsequently susceptible of reconsideration. 

Mr. Bishop ot Ward Seven believed the point of or- 
der covered the question. 

Mr Morse of Ward Thirteen thought the Council 
had not adopted Cushing's Manual as its rule of action, 
but had rules of its own which admitted the consider- 
ation of the motion which had been made. 

The Chair ruled that it was competent for a mem- 
ber to move a reconsideration of an indefinite post- 
ponement. 

The question was taken on the motion for reconsid- 
eration, which was carried, when the indefinite post- 
ponement was rejected. 

The report of the committee was stated as under 
consideration, and the President read the report sub- 
mitted to the Council last week. 

The question was taken on the report, which was 
accepted. 

The order for the additional widening of Tremont 
street, on the westerly side, by taking the land speci- 
fied therein, was taken up, the question being on its 
passage. 

Mr. Keith of Ward Fifteen said that when the mat- 
ter was up before, he indicated that but for the Hotel 
Pelham he should have been in favor of making the 
street eighty feet in width. If the street is to be 
widened by removing the hotel, when the building is 
once upon rollers it will be as easy to make the street 
twenty feet wider. Tremont street is an important 
avenue, and this end of it should not be ol'a less width 
than the southerly portion. 

Several years since, the small city of Roxbury car- 
ried out the widening of Tremont street within its 
limits to an uniform width of one hundred feet, and 
it ought not to be supposed that this city, with all its 
wealth, can fail to make the street what it ought to be. 



The proposed widening will ruin many estates, and 
while in contemplation the widening should be such 
as will answer for all time to come. We have seen 
the folly of not adopting the plan of widening Wash- 
ington street in the time of the elder Quincy, and 
now we are going over the same piece of folly. 
While engaged in this widening we should make this 
avenue eighty feet. If told that Columbus avenue, 
is to be opened as a great avenue to the South End, 
it was a sufficient answer that it neither begun any- 
where, or ended anywhere, and would not relieve the 
public travel. If necessary a million of dollars should 
be expended, and it would be a saving to the city, in- 
stead of taking a shaving at a time, as the usual 
policy has been. He could not see the advantage of 
this narrow kind of policy, and the consequence 
would be that we should never have an important 
avenue. He therefore moved to recommit the report, 
with instructions to make the street an eighty-feet 
avenue. 

The Chair ruled that such a motion could not be 
entertained, for the reason that the Board of Alder- 
men had the control of such matters and the question 
was simply that of concurrence or non-concurrence. 

Mr. Keith modified his motion by moving simply 
to recommit. 

Mr. Wright of Ward Twelve said it was his opinion 
that it would be best to pass this order as it was. 
It was desirable to have wide streets, eighty feet, if 
possible, yet a sixty-foot street was very respectable 
in width in Boston, and the cost required strikes many 
tax-payers as enormous and ruinous. Let, then, this 
order be passed, and if necessary, another order can 
be passed, by which the attention of the Board of Al- 
dermen will be called to the subject, and if they see 
lit, can make the widening greater. 

Mr. Osbom of Ward Six wished to know what good 
it would do to recommit to a committee of this branch. 
The Council had simply to concur or to non-concur 
with the Board of Aldermen, and it would be folly to 
recommit. The only effect would be to hinder the 
work, and as he understood the bond now held for an 
estate was limited in time, required immediate action. 
He agreed that it would be desirable to have eighty- 
feet streets, yet sixty feet is all that we can reasona- 
bly afford, and that we ought to provide for. 

Mr. Keith said his contemplation of an eighty -feet 
street included also that portion of the street from 
Park street Church to Boyiston street, and to the 
bridge, by taking a portion of the mall. He doubted 
whether the Council would have objected to the pass- 
age of an order for an eighty-feet street if such an 
order had been sent up from the Board of Aldermen. 
There appeared to be a fear on the part of each 
branch that the other would not sustain the measure. 
In relation to the expense it would not be double to 
add twenty more feet while, widening, because in cut- 
ting off it will not cost any more in putting up new 
fronts. If this opportunity is neglected, the time will 
come when the street will be as much blocked up as 
it is now. If this is neglected it will be a stain upon 
the city administration, which is guilty of the neglect. 
It was not on account of opposition to this measure 
that he objected, but because of the failure to do 
enough. When the measure can be carried it ought 
to be, and he believed that on an expression of opinion 
by this branch in favor of an eighty- feet street, the 
other branch will be willing to carry out the proposi- 
tion. 

Mr. Rockwell of Ward Ten was inclined to agree 
with the gentleman from Ward Fifteen, but the routine 
through which we are obliged to go did not admit of 
the carrying out of his project. There were difficulties 
in the way of it which were almost insuperable — the 
necessity of demolishing a part of the Hotel Pelham, 
and the enormous expense, being among them. 

Mr Keith replied, that as there were two estates be- 
tween the Hotel Pelham and the Public Library, both 
of them could be purchased, and this would admit of 
an eighty-foot street in the removal of the hotel with- 
out the demolition of any part of it. 

Mr Rockwell resumed, that it would be better to 
pass this order now, and if it was desirable to pass 
another order, he would be in favor of it. 

Mr. Keith made further remarks in support of his 
motion, declaring his willingness to attend meetings 
of the Council at such times as may be necessary to 
carry this measure. 

Mr. Snow of Ward Eleven said there was a difficul- 
ty in relation to the limited time of a bond for land ly- 
ing back of the Hotel Pelham. He suggested wheth- 
re the motion could not be amended to allow the tak- 
ing of the land in question which would be necessary 



16 



PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



whether the street should) be sixty or eighty feet. 

Mr. Dennj of Ward Ten Looked upon ii as a farce to 
Instruct the Board of Aldermen on this subject. Be 
was in favor of an eighty-fool street, if practicable, 
but believed thai In this case it would ruin many es- 
tates, and cost a million of dollars, lie hail no idea 
that the Board of Aldermen, alter their long consider- 
ation of this subject, would listen to the proposition. 
The widening had been under consideration for many 
years, both iii the < ity Government and out of it, and 
in- was in favor of acting upon the motion at once. 

Mv. Wadsworth of Ward Four agreed with the gen- 
tleman Who last spoke, that action should be taken at 
once. Columbus aveuue is to be opened as a part of 
the Church street improvement, and that will be a re- 
lief to travel. There would then be four avenues to 
the Highland District. The city has already laid it- 
self liable for damages by reqiuriug the cutting off an 
estate on the east side ofTremont street; the city has 
taken portions of land belonging to Mr. Dix and to 
Mr. Apthorp; parties are engaged in making their 
fronts under the widening already adopted, and the 
Church street improvement is in the hands of the 
Commissioners. 

Under such circumstances there should be no delay, 
and there should lie no change in the action which lias 
already been adopted in relation to the widening of 
the street on the east side as well as on the west. 

One reason he understood for not widening the 
street on the east side was that a member of the com- 
mittee lived there, who would be disturbed by the 
Widening. He also insisted that the widening on the 
west side alone would be more expensive than as al- 
ready ordered. 

Mr. Carney of Ward Two stated that the proposed 
additional widening would cost but $7500 more than 
iimler the plan of widening adopted already, while the 
improvement would be much greater. 

The motion to recommit the report was lost, when 
the yeas and uays were ordered ou the passage of the 
order. 

Mr. Wadsworth of Ward Four inquired if the order 
discontinued the widening previously ordered on the 
easterly side of the street. 

The Chair stated that no other question was under 
consideration but that specified in the order. 

The question was taken and the order was passed 
by a vote of 33 yeas to 10 nays, as follows : 

Yeas— Allen (President), Bean, Bryden, Butler, Car- 
ney, Denny, Dolan, Driscoll, Gray, Harris, Hobbs, 
Hopkins, keanev, Kingsbury, Leighton, Malone, Nel- 
son, Osborn, Parker, Phelps, Pickering, L. Rice, 
s. llice, Rockwell, Ryan, Snow, Squires, Thayer, 
Tucker, Wells, Woollev, Wright, Young. 

Nays— Batchelder, Bishop, Dinsmore, Jacobs, Keith, 
Minon, Morse, Nason, Villi Nostrand, Wadsworth. 

The other orders, for the purchase of the estate of 
Mr. Ward, adjoining the Hotel Pelham, and authoriz- 
ing that in the settlement with Dr. Dix, said estate be 
transferred to him, were severally passed. 

Ou motion of Mr. Van Nostrand of Ward Twelve, 
the order to transfer $11,275 from the Reserved Fund 
to the appropriation for Common and Squares, was 
taken from the table, when, on the suggestion that 
there was not a sufficient number of members present 
for its passage, it was again laid on the table. 

ORDERS PASSED. 

Mr. Beau of Ward Eleven offered the following : 

ordered, That the Commissioners on the Church 
Street District be authorized with the approval of the 
Mayor to pay for such estates as may be taken by the 
city, and to make such settlements for said estates as 
they may deem for the best interests of the city. 

Some misapprehension being expressed as to the 
terms of the order, Mr. Nelson of Ward Nine said he 
had been informed that this order came from the City 
Solicitor, who was of opinion that there was now no 
party which was authorized to settle for such estates 
as may be taken in carrying out the Church street 
improvement. 

The order was passed. 

Ordered, That the Commissioners on the Church 
Street District be authorized to sell by public auction, 
under the direction of the joint special committee on 
the subject, such buildings or materials belonging t>> 
tin' city as they may deem expedient, the proceeds to 
be paid into the City Treasury, subject to the appro- 
priation for the Church Street District. 

Ordered, That the Joint Standing Committee on 
Ordinances inquire by what authority and exclusive 
right the proprietors 'of certain hacks occupy stands 
in the streets against some of the railroad depots, and 
what further action should be taken in connection 
therewith. 



OBDERS OFFERED. 

Mr. Bean of Ward Eleven, from the Committee on 
Public Buildings, made a report, that upon an exam- 
ination of the boilers in the City Hall, which had been 
in use four years, they were found to be cracked, and 
in bad condition. They therefor ofl'ered the following 
order : 

Ordered, That the Committee on Public Buildings 
be authorized to replace the boilers in the City Hall 
by two new tubular boiler-. 

Mr. Rice of Ward Four opposed the order believing 
it would be dangerous to place that kind of boilers 
in the City Hall. 

The order was rejected. 

The orders, authorizing the erection of a new Police 
Station House and Ward Room in Ward Thirteen and 
for a loan of $40,000 therefor, which, as unfinished 
business, had been laid on the table, were taken up, 
and referred to the Committee on Public Buildings, 
with instructions to procure plans and estimates Of 
the cost oft lie erection of such a building. 

Mr. Phelps of Ward Fourteen offered an order 
authorizing the Committee on Public Building- to 
purchase a lot of land of Henry A. Walker, on war- 
ren Square, for a ward room and a hook and ladder 
house, and procure plans and estimates for the same. 
Referred to the same committee. 

Mr. Rockwell of Ward Ten offered an order that a 
committee of three be appointed to consider the sub- 
ject of amending the Joint Rules and orders so as to 
permit of appropriations being made by two-thirds of 
the members present. 

The order was opposed by Messrs. Wadsworth of 
Ward Four, and Pickering of Ward Fifteen, as cal- 
culated to lead to looseness iu making appropria- 
tions. 

Pending its consideration, the Council adjourned. 



Proceedings of Board of Aldermen, 

AUGUST 11, 1868. 

A special meeting of the Board of Aldermen was 
held this forenoon, beginning at eleven o'clock, Mayor 
sliurtleff in the chair. 

REPORTS OF CITY OFFICERS. 

The Superintendent of streets presented a com- 
munication setting forth that certain parties had 
neglected to construct sidewalks after being duly 
notified to do so, and that such sidewalks had been 
laid at the expense of the city. The communication 
included an order that the expense of such construc- 
tion be collected from the parties, which was passed. 

PETITIONS PRESENTED AND REFERRED. 

John C. Pillsbury and others, for removal of city 
offal house; Wm. Lynch, that Charter street be re- 
paired ; heirs of Win. Dickey, for abatement of tax; 
Dearborn & Co., for license as auctioneers; H. 1). 
Clark, for leave to hold a fair at Horticultural Hall 
in November next. 

INTENTIONS TO BUILD. 
John McKinnon, corner London and Bennington 
streets; Edwin Rice, Saratoga street, East Boston; 
1). E. Poland, 32 and .'50 High street; James H. 
Marquand, 84 Princeton street, East Boston; A. L. 
Bailey, corner of Iv and Ninth streets; J. B. Simpson, 
corner of George and Magazine streets, Boston 
Highlands; Benjamin II. Flanders, Shaving street; 
David A. Berry, Fifth, between O and P streets; 
James Loughlin, New Heath street, near Centre 
street ; G. W. Meserve, corner of Kueeland place aud 
Kueelaud street. 

PAPERS FROM THE COMMON COUNCIL 
were passed in concurrence as follows : 

Resolution instructing the Joint Standing Com- 
mittee on Ordinances to inquire and report what 
authority has been given to the owners of hacks to 
occupy stands at certain railroad depots and what 
further action, if any, should be taken in connection 
therewith. 



PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COIITSTCIE. 



17 



Reference to Committee on Public Builili gs of 
an order (<> purchase land of Henry A. Walker for 
a ward room and engine house. 

Reference 1o same committee of an order for the 
erection of a police station and ward room in Ward 
Thirteen. 

Order authorizing the Joint Special Committee on 
the Church street District, to pay for estates taken and 
make settlements with the owners of estates in said 
district. 

Order authorizing the Commissioners on Church 
Street District to sell certain buildings and materials 
by auction. 

REPORTS PLACED ON FILE. 

The Auditor's monthly exhibit for August, 18<;.">, and 
the eleventh annual report of the Board Of Directors 
Of Public Institutions, were received and placed on 
file. 

THE ABATEMENT OK NUISANCES. 

Alderman Messinger, from the Committee on Health, 
reported orders, which Mere passed empowering the 
Superintendent of lit alth to abate nuisances in Berlin, 
corner Cunard and Berlin streets, corner Coventry and 
Berlin streets, Tremont street, between Tremont, 
Court and Buggies streets, Buggies anil Brentiss, Tre- 
mont place and Buggies street, Magazine, Dunlow, 
North Phillips, Nashua, Warrenton, Albany, Dover, 
Harrison avenue, Foundry square, between Sixth and 
Tudor, and west from C, Fnrroll place, Swan street, 
Second, Federal, Broadway. 

< >rdor that the Superintendent of Sewers, on consul- 
tation with the Superintendent of Health, be directed 
to construct a sewer in Orange court, for the purpose 
Of abating a nuisance there, the expense to be charged 
to the appropriation for health. Passed. 

REPORTS OF COMMITTEES. 

Alderman White, from the Committee on Licenses, 
reported in favor of granting unite a number of licen- 
ses to different parties. The report was accepted. 
Report, leave to withdraw, was made upon the peti- 
tions of the following named persons: Hugh Lee, 54 
Dedham street; Anna Wayland, 371 First street; 
Margaret Bradley, 7 Hamilton street; Mrs. Julia Sta- 
cey, 148 Merrimac street; Amelia Anderson, 9 Chick- 
ering place; John Driscoll, 58 Joy street; George H. 
Stuart, 45 Green street. The Committee on Licenses 
also reported in fa vor of revoking the license of E. E. 
Bandall, 78'.. Green street, for cause. All these re- 
ports were accepted by the Board. 

ORDER OF NOTICE. 

Alderman Paul, from the Committee on Slreets, 
reported the following order, which was adopted : 

That due notice be given to G. W. Meserve, J. C. 
Hayncs, J. G. Haynes. and all other parties interested, 
that this Board intend to widen Kneeland street, by 
taking a part of the land now about to be built upon 
by G. W. Meserve, and lay the same out as a public 
street, and that Monthly, the -J4th day of August, at 
four o'clock P. M., is assigned as the time for hearing 
any objections which may be made thereto. 

Adjourned. 



Proceedings of Board of Aldermen, 

AUGUST 24, 1868. 



The regular meeting of the Board of Aldermen 
was held, pursuant to adjournment, at 4 o'clock!'. M., 
His Honor Mayor Shurtfeff in the chair. 

PETITIONS PRESENTED AND REFERRED. 

Petition of John K. Erskine and others, that Paris 
street be accepted ; to Committee on Streets. Petition 
of Marginal Freight R. R. Co., for a location in this 
city ; to Committee on Streets. Petition of Metropol- 
itan It. B. Co., for extension of location in Shawmut 
avenue to West Boxbury line ; to Committee on Streets. 
Petition of Charles G." Green and others, for use of 
Faneuil Hall, August 29 and September '2; to Commit- 



tee on Faneuil Hall. Petition of Charles Stoddard 
that the deposits from the sewer at corner of Charles 
and Beacon streets be removed by dredging; to Com- 
mittee on Harbor. Petition of Amos J. Dean for 
compensation for damages caused by the diversion of 
Stony Brook ; to ( ommittee ou Sewers. Remonstrance 
of Daniel Leahy and others against the proposed ex- 
tension of the Jewish Burial Ground at East Boston; 
to Committee on Cemeteries. Petition of John C. 
Haynes and others that the board fence on Indiana, 
place be removed ; to ( 'ommittee on Paving. Petition 
of J. J. Monroe and others that Walnut avenue be wi- 
dened on the Haskins estate; to Committee on 
Streets. 

Petition of Elizabeth Xoyes for abatement of her 
fax for 1WJ7; to Committee on Ass >ssors' Department. 
Petition of H. F. Thayer and others for a sewer in 
Cabot street; to Committee on Sewers. Petition of 
Lewis Endicott, Executor, and others, to be relieved 
from injuries caused by surface water on Prescott 
street ; to Committee on Paving. Petition of .1. D. K. 
Willis that West Canton street between Columbus and 
Warren avenues be accepted; to Committee on Pav- 
ing. Petition of J. G. Abbott and others for use of 
Faneuil Hall on Sept. 22d ; to Committee on Faneuil 
Hall. Petition of C. Bixby for the naming of Tilden 
place ; to Committee on Paving. Petition of Hiram 
P. Bean that Dartmouth street between Warren and 
Columbus avenues be accepted; to Committee ou 
Streets. Petition of F. S. Newhall & Sons for a re- 
consideration of their petition for an abatement of 
tax ; to Committee on Assessors' Department. Petition 
of Daniel Austin for a steam engine on Warren ave- 
nue witli an order of notice thereon. 

INTENTIONS TO BUILD. 
John M. Allen. Athens, between C and D streets; 
Martin Fay, Bain bridge street, Boxbury; Charles 
Street Baptist Society, corner of Charles and Mt. 
Vernon street, altering the tower of the church and 
changing ground lines; John II. Murphy, 238 Federal 
street; Horace B. Sargent, corner Washington street 
and Shawmut avenue; Jesse B. Gilmore, Fourth, 
between M and N streets; Miss Lowry, 255 Sumner 
street, East Boston; J. T. Grendell, 6th, between 
L and M streets ; F. S. Merritt, Grove Hall avenue, 
Bo\bury ; F. <). Clark, Fourth, between Dorchester 
and F streets; Morton & Chesley, Wareham street; 
Jeremiah Flavin, London, between Decatur and 
Maverick streets; William Wood, Fourth, between L 
and K streets; Peter Walsh, 3 Moon street; G. W. 
Decatur, (iS!t Parker street, Boxbury; Charles H 
Leach, 22 Prospect, street ; J. M. Marston, Zeigler, 
between Fustis ami Dearbon streets, Roxbury; W. B. 
Wadman, Grove Hall avenue, near Moreland street, 
Boxbury; John Towne & Son, North Grove, near 
Cambridge street; F. L. Pareher, Foundry, near 
Hampden street. Boxbury; William Donaldson cor- 
ner of Regent and Akron streets, Roxbury; M. M. 
Allen, Williams, between Washington street ami 
shawmut avenue; Daniel Gallivan, 1!)4 Fourth street, 
South Boston. 

APPOINTMENTS. 

George A. Rogers, as Constable; Thomas P. Begley, 
foreman of the hose of Engine Co. No. 4; George s. 
Munroe, police officer without pay, for duty at the 
Church street District. 

ORDERS OF NOTICE. 

The following orders of notice returnable this day 

were severally considered: 

On construction of sewer in Warren street, from 
Moreland street to Montrose avenue. Recommitted. 

On construction of sewer in Beacon street, near 
Tremont street. Recommitted. 

On construction of sewers in Mt. Pleasant avenue, 
anil in Forest street. Recommitted. 

On widening Kneeland street on estate of G. W. 
Meserve ami others. Recommitted. 

On discontinuing a portion of Kneeland street, near 
estate of Elizabeth M. Hayes. Recommitted. 

On widening High street, between Federal and 
Summer streets. Mr. J. D. Ball appeared in behalf of 
Mr. Gleason, an owner of estate to be affected by tint 
widening, from which estate it was proposed to take 
twelve feet upon the northerly side, ami nine and a 
half upon the southerly side, and claimed that this 
action upon the part of the City Government would 
substantially destroy the value of the estate of Mr. 
Gleason, and almost prevent him from carrying on 
his business as an apothecary in that location ; while 
the widening could be made upon the other side of 
the street with less detriment, and leave large estates 
at the same time. Order recommitted. 



18 



PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



On laying out and widening portions of Berlin, 
Piedmont, Shawmut and Sonth Cedar (streets. Sever- 
ally recommitted. 

On laying out portions Of Grenville place, Marion 
and Tennyson streets. Severally recommitted. 

On extending Avon place, to Chauncy street. Mr. 
Wheeler appeared on behalf of the proprietors of the 
Second Church, to protest against the proposed action, 
and read a rote of the society stating its remonstrance. 
Order recommitted. 

on extension of Brimmer street to Mt. Vernon 
street. Mr. Elliot appeared in behalf of the trustees 
of the estate of William P. Otis to remonstrate and 
to ask the privilege of a hearing. Mr. Richie, trustee 
for the same estate, joined in remonstrance. Order 
recommitted. 

rMINlsiii:t) BUSINESS. 
Order to assess betterment on estates in Bowker 
street. Laid upon the table on motion of Alderman 
Talbot. 

WIDENING OF TREMONT STREET. 

A petition was presented from G. A. Gardner and 
150 others in favor of widening Tremont street to 80 

feet instead of fin, as being the Least width which could 
properly accommodate public travel. 

Alderman Messinger moved to lay the petition upon 
the table until Monday next, the Board not being full. 
Although the committee hail as he understood, made 
all their arrangements for widening this street, he 
would at the same time desire the matter to be fully 
discussed in the Board before going to the committee, 
and not take up the time of the committee if the majori- 
ty of the Hoard should be opposed to it. 

Alderman Paul hoped the petition would take the 
usual coarse. The committee were full if the Board 
was not; and if anything was to be done, or if the 
thing was to be kilied, the quicker it were known the 
better. 

Petition referred to the Committee on Streets. 

Alderman Messinger hereupon offered a resolution, 
and moved to lay the same upon the table, declaring 
that it is inexpedient to widen Tremont street, so that 
its width should exceed sixty feet. 

Alderman Paul desired to hear some reasons for 
adopting such a resolution. 

Alderman Messinger stated that the resolution was 
offered in order to have the matter fully discussed 
before the Board. 

Resolution laid upon the table. 

REPORTS OF COMMITTEES. 

Alderman White, from the Committee on Licenses, 
reported in favor of granting sundry licenses to inn- 
holders and victuallers. Accepted. 

Alderman Talbot, from the Committee on Streets, 
reported no action necessary upon sundry notices of 
intention to build. Accepted. 

Alderman Messinger, from the Committee on 
Health, reported notice to abate sundry nuisances. 
Accepted. 

Alderman White, from the Committee on Licenses, 
reported an order that notice be sent to the License 
Commissioners of this county that the Board does not 
approve the licenses proposed to be granted to Amelia 
Anderson, it Chiekering place ; Chas. K. Heath (victu- 
aller), 7 Green street; Edward E. Randall, 1% Green 
strict ; John F. Rem bold, Dearborn street, and John 
11. Harry (grocer), Fourth and P streets. 

Also in favor of granting sundry petitions for licen- 
ses for intelligence offices, beer saloon, bootblacks, 
wagons; also leave to hold fairs in Horticultural Hall ; 
also leave to J B. Booth to give dramatic performan- 
ces in Boston Theatre. Accepted. 

Alderman Talbot, from the Committee on streets, 
reported order of notice to John H. l)ix. Charles W. 
Galloupe, SerenoD. Nickerson, Francis Bundy, heirs 
of Samuel Jepson, Annie F. and Harriet Louisa Odin, 
heirs of Jonathan Patten, John Leukhardt, heirs of 
Luther Parker, Sarah A. Hammond, Eunice M. and 
Eliza A. Gridley and Franklin Smith, to vacate and 
surrender On or before September 15th land and prem- 
ises on Tremont street, taken by resolve passed Au- 
gust 14. Order passed. 

Alderman Talbot from the Committee on Assessors' 
Department, reported an order abating tax of William 
Dickey's heirs amounting to $26 30. Order passed. 

COMMUNICATION. 

A communication was received from the Superin- 
tendent of Common Sewers, submitting estimates of 
assessments lor the construction of sewers in Wall, 
Providence and Clarendon streets, amounting in all 
to $-2740 28. Referred to Committee on Sewers. 



A communication was received from the Sheriff of 
Suffolk county submitting for approval the amount of 
expense in maintenance of the Counts Jail, the same 

amounting to $1668 08. Approved. 

OKDEB8 I' ISSED. 

Whereas, a contract was made on Nov. 1, 1867, be- 
tween Thomas Dolan and the City of Roxbury, for the 

walling ami covering of a portion of Stony Brook, 
which contract specifies that a reserved balance of 28 
percent. Of the amount Of the contract -hall be paid 
upon the completion of the work, and its acceptance 
by the Board of Alderman, or those succeeding to 
their rights and duties, therefore, 

Ordered, That said work be and is hereby accepted, 
and that said balance be paid to Thomas Dolan on ac- 
count of his contract on Stony Brook. 

Ordered, That the Superintendent of Streets be and 
he is hereby directed to construct a common sewer in 
Beacon street, and to report a schedule of the expense 
thereof to the Board, pursuant to law. 

Ordered, That the Superintendent of Public Build- 
ings be authorized to erect a flag-staff on Telegraph 
Hill, in South Boston, at an expense not exceeding 
$700, to be charged to the appropriation for inciden- 
tals. 

Ordered, That there be paid to the Old Colony & 
Newport Railway Company and Henry Crofts & Son 
and Charles Harrow, tenants, £10,802 for land taken 
and damages occasioned by the widening of Federal 
street, by a resolve passed June 0, 1868. 

Ordered, That the Committee on Bridges be au- 
thorized to expend a sum not exceeding $2000, in 
making such repairs as are required on the Dover 
street bridge; said sum to be charged to the appro- 
priation for bridges. 

Ordered, That the Chief Engineer of the Fire De- 
partment be and he is hereby authorized to have 
Engine No. G repaired, at an expense not exceeding 
$m0, the same to be charged to the appropriation 
for the Fire Department. 

Ordered, That there be paid to Samuel M. Phillips 
the sum of $10,000 for his estate on Tremont street, 
purchased by authority of an order of the City Council, 
passed July 18, 1808, and that the same be charged to 
the Tremont street loan. 

Ordered, That the order to pay S. M. Phillips 
$8883, passed Aug. 4, be and the same is hereby re- 
scinded. 

Ordered, That the Committee on Public Buildings 
be authorized to make such repairs as may be needed 
in Engine House No. 12, Police station House No. 1, 
and Hose House No. 4, the expense to be charged to 
the appropriation for Public Buildings. 

Ordered, That the Superintendent of Sewers be 
and he is hereby directed to extend the sewer in 
High street to the front of the estate of Joseph B. 
Glover, and to assess three-fourths of the expense 
upon said Glover. 

Ordered, In addition to the rights heretofore granted 
to the Metropolitan Railroad Company, to lay down 
tracks in several of the streets of the City of "Boston, 
said company shall have the right to lay down a side 
track on the easterly side of Washington street, be- 
tween East Brookline and East Newton streets. 

The right to lay down the tracks located by this 
order is upon the condition that the whole work of 
laying down the tracks, the precise location of the 
same, and the form of rail to be used shall be under 
the direction and to the satisfaction of the Committee 
on Paving and Superintendent of Streets, and shall 
be approved by them. 

Also upon the condition that the space between the 
rails and three feet on each side thereof shall be paved 
with wooden pavement, or granite blocks of susn size 
and quality as the Superintendent of Streets shall 
direct. 

Also upon the condition that the said Metropolitan 
Railroad Company shall accept this order of location 
and agree in writing to COmplv with the conditions 
therein contained, ami tile said acceptance and agree- 
ment with the City Clerk within twenty days of the 
date of its passage, otherwise it shall be" null aud 
void. 

Ordered, That there be paid to Phineas A. Stone the 
sum of $1150, for land taken and damages occasioned 
by the widening of Cross street, by a resolve passed 
April 28, 1868. 

Ordered, That there be paid to the heirs of Pren- 
tiss Hobbs the sum of $12,000 for land taken and dam- 
ages occasioned by the widening of Federal street. 
by a resolve passed June 0, 1868. 

'Ordered, That there be paid to the Fulton Iron 
Foundry Company the sum of $1200. for land taken 



PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



19 



and damages occasioned by the widening of Federal 
street, by a resolve passed June 0, 1808. 

Ordered, That the portion of land on Richmond 
street, adjoining the estate of Elizabeth McDonald 
Hayes, wife of Charles Hayes, be and the same is 
hereby discontinued as a public street or way of the 
said city, according to a plan of the same made by 
Thomas W. Davis, City Surveyor, dated Aug. 3, 
1868. 

Adjourned to Monday next at 4 o'clock. 



Proceedings of the Common Council, 



AUG. 27, 1868. 



In pursuance of a message from His Honor the 
Mayor, a special meeting of the Common Council was 
held atT'i P. M., the President in the chair, for the 
purpose of considering the subject of an appropriation 
for the Common and Public Squares, and such other 
matters as should require attention. 

FROM THE BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 

The following orders, sent down for concurrence, 
were read a second time and passed. 

Order for necessary repairs of Engine House No. 
12, Police Station House No. 1, and Hose House No. 4. 

Order for the erection of a flag-staff on Telegraph 
Hill, South Boston, at an expense of not exceeding 
$700. 

Order authorizing the Committee on Streets to sell 
the remainder of estates purchased by the city after 
widening upon Tremont and Federal streets. 

UNFINISHED BUSINESS. 

The order for a joint committee to consider the 
expediency of so amending the rules so as to permit 
the ordering of appropriations by the votes of two- 
thirds of the members present was considered. 

Mr. Jenks of Ward Three hoped that no alteration 
would be made, being of the opinion that there were 
none too many safeguards thrown around the making 
of appropriations at present; and if they were any 
change to be made, he would prefer to require three- 
fourths instead of two-thirds. 

Mr. Rockwell of Ward Ten stated that the order 
was one which he had offered as the result of some 
years of experience in the affairs at the City Hall, 
believing that a great many good measures had been 
defeated, or had been postponed, by the operation of 
the present rule, and believing that no bad measure 
was likely to be carried under the rule as he would 
like to have it; because it was not to be expected that 
a bad measure could be carried through without some 
agitation nor without the knowledge of the members 
present and some expression of opinion. It has been 
remarked at the last meeting that under such a rule 
seventeen members could pass an appropriation. 
That was true mathematically, but practically it had 
never occurred. The order had been offered in the 
belief that it was right; but if it is not right, he did 
not desire to urge it, and would therefore withdraw 
the order. 

NEW BOILERS FOR THE CITY HALL. 

On motion of Mr. Bean of Ward Eleven the order 
which was refused a second reading at the last meet- 
ing, authorizing putting new boilers into the City 
Hall, was reconsidered. 

Mr. Rockwell of Ward Ten, in view of the issue at 
the last meeting having been as to whether the tubu- 
lar boilers which were proposed by the Committee on 
Public Buildings would be sufficiently safe, desired 
that such measures should be taken as should provide 
for the greatest security, and boilers might be placed 
in the building in regard to the safety of which there 
could be no doubt. 

Mr. Bean of Ward Eleven was of the opinion that 
there could be no doubt in regard to the safety of the 
tubular boilers recommended by the Committee. 



They have been tested under a pressure of 150 pounds, 
while only eight or ten pounds would be required in 
order to heat the building. They were being put into 
our schoolhouses every year for heating purposes. 

Mr. Kice of Ward Four called attention to an explo- 
sion of tubular boilers at Deer Island, where the 
fireman was killed, and several injured, and the 
building very much damaged; a new boiler being 
afterwards placed outside of the building. He had 
received a statement in regard to the number of explo- 
sions, from which it appeared that there were two 
explosions each week throughout the country. Mr. 
Rice moved that the order be recommitted with the 
instructions to procure a boiler which would be 
entirely safe. 

The motion was, however, withdrawn to permit the 
introduction of another order as a substitute by Mr. 
Bean of Ward Eleven, the same being accompanied 
by a communication from parties engaged in putting 
in boilers, which was read. 

Mr. Bean also stated that the old boilers were now 
out of order, and that it would cost as much within 
$800 to make the necessary repairs as it would to put 
in new ones; and that the" parties proposing to put in 
the new boilers recommended by the Committee 
would put them in free of expense, provided they cou 1< I 
be allowed the coal which would be saved in three 
years' time. 

Mr. Rockwell of Ward Ten inferred from the com- 
munication which had been read that there was not 
an absolute security in the use of the tubular boilers 
unless they should be well made and properly man- 
aged. He "thought the order should go back' to the 
committee. 

Mr. Rice of Ward Four moved to amend by directing 
the committee to procure the Harrison boiler. 

Mr. Wright of Ward Twelve said that the Harrison 
boiler had not been considered by the committee, as he 
learned from one of the members, and a boiler could 
perhaps be obtained, involving no risk in its opera- 
tion — a matter of great importance to every person oc- 
cupying a seat in the Council. There was a great di- 
vergence of opinion among boiler makers as to the 
safety of different boilers. They should never be 
placed under a building, but in the case of the City 
Hall there was no room to put them elsewhere. That 
the committee, without any positive instructions, 
might have an opportunity of considering the Harri- 
son boiler, Mr. Wright moved to recommit the whole 
subject to the Committee on Public Buildings. The 
matter was disposed of in that way. 

ORDERS INTRODUCED. 

Mr. Wright of Ward Twelve introduced an order to 
pass certain bills for services rendered and materials 
furnished by persons connected directly or indirectly 
with the City Government, provided the same be al- 
lowed and approved in the usual manner. 

Read a second time and passed. 

Mr. Flanders of Ward Five presented an order au- 
thorizing the Superintendent of Public Buildings to 
repair Eastern Avenue Wharf, owued by the City, at 
an expense of $3000. 

Messrs. Malone and Bishop opposed the passage of 
the order and upon motion of the latter it was referred 
to the Committee on Public Buildings. 

ORDERS PASSED. 

The order to transfer $11,275 from the reserved fund 
to that of the Common and Public Squares was taken 
from the table and passed— 40 to 5. 

Also the order to add two thousand dollars to the 
appropriation for the celebration of the Fourth of July 
last, by a vote of 34 to 10. 

COURTESIES OF THE CITY. 
Mr. Osborn of Ward Six offered an order extending 
the courtesies of the city to members of the late Army 
of the James, who were to hold a meeting- in Boston 
during the coming week. Mr. Osborn spoke of the 
body of men who were to assemble to form a social 
organization (similar to that formed by members of 
the Army of the Cumberland) as including many men 
whose names were favorably anil extensively known 
throughout the country. He deemed the occasion a 
lit one to offer some courtesies on the part of the city, 
such as an excursion down the harbor, which would 
involve only a comparatively small expense, and 
would be highly appreciated. Mr. Osborn read a list 
of the officers whom it was hoped would be present, 
beginning with Gen. Terry and concluding with Gen. 
Couch. He said that the gathering would include men 
eminent as merchants and in other walks of life, and 
would assemble for no political purpose whatever. 



20 



PROCEEDINO-S OF CITY COUNCIL. 



m r. Wella of Ward Three thought that to spend the 
monej of the city in this manner was not one <>i' the 
objects of the ( lity « toi erment, and he opposed it. 

Mr. Jenks of ward Three understood the organiza- 
tion referred to ii> be clearly a political one, and the 
gathering to be for political purposes merely, and for 
the sole purpose of advancing the political interest- of 
a man who formerly led thai army. 

Mr. Wright of Ward Twelve did not understand the 
organization to be political, and hoped it would do! 
be opposed upon any such grounds. The city had ex- 
tended hospitalities to commercial conventions, to the 
Chinese Embassy, and had received General Sheridan 
with considerable military parade; also the General 
at the head of the army. ' it was therefore eminently 
fitting that some modest attention should be paid to 
so many Union Generals coming here ton-ether in one 
lot. 

Mr. Bishop of Ward Seven eared not whether those 
Generals came here for a political purpose or not. lie 
was opposed to voting away the money of the citizens 
for any such purpose, in the case of the commercial 
conventions, met here to discuss questions of trade, 
and particularly in that of the Chinese Embassy, great 
advantages would no doubt ultimately result to the 
languishing business of the city. 

Mr. DarrOW favored the adoption of the order. 

Mr. Wells of Ward Three moved to lay the order 
upon the table. Lost 

Mr. Bishop of Ward Seven moved to amend by pro 
viding that the expenses should not exceed one thou- 
sand dollars. Lost. 

Mr. Bishop moved that the whole matter be indefi- 
nitely postponed. Lost. 

Mr. Osborn Of Ward Six moved to suspend the rules, 
so that the order might be passed to a second reading. 

Mr. Denny of Ward Ten stated that he knew that 
the organization of the officers of the Army of the 
.James was not a political body, and among the names 
read by Mr. Osborn was a Democratic candidate for 
Governor. He did not know where the line was to be 
drawn in the extending of hospitalities, but should 
vote for the order with the understanding that the 
expense was to be small, not more than two or three 
thousand dollars. 

Mr. Jenks of Ward Three should vote against it 
with the idea that it was a gathering which was to 
take place here for the purpose of influencing the 
election in the State of Maine. 

The yeas and nays having been called upon the 
question of suspending the rules, the motion was lost 
by a vote of 22 to 22, as follows :— 

Yeas— Messrs. Batchelder, Bean, Barrow, Denny, 
Emerson, Gray, Hopkins. Knight, Leighton, Nelson, 
Newton, Osborn, Phelps, 'Pickering, Rice. L.. Snow, 
Squires, Tucker, Wilson, Woollev, Wright, Young— 22. 

Nays— Messrs. Bishop, Butler, Carney, Dolan, Dris- 
coll, Flanders, Flvnn, Jacobs, Jenks, Keany, Kings- 
bury, Malone. Minon, Morse, Rockwell, Rogers, Ryan, 
Van" Nostrand, Welis, Weston , H. H. White, J. White, 
.)•). 

The Council then adjourned. 



Proceedings of Board of Aldermen, 



AUG. 31, 1808. 



The regular meeting of the Board of Aldermen 
was held at 4 o'clock P. M., His Honor Mayor 
Shurtleff presiding. 

Papers from the Common Council were severally 
acted Upon in concurrence. 

PETITIONS PRESENTED AND REFERRED. 

Petition Of Andrew Hathaway and others, that 
Ontario street be extended to Sixth street and ac- 
cepted; petition of George Curtis for leave to place 
a draw bridge across Roxbury canal; petition Of 
Laurence Richards, thai the wall of house No. l(i 
Beach street be finished with face brick: severally 
referred to the Committee on streets. 



Petition of Ira Allen and others tor abatement of 
a nuisance caused by diversion of Stony Brook; 
petition of Fearing <s Renfrew for leave to build a 

stable for more than lour horses On Dove street, 
between Hand F streets : severally referred to Com 
niittee on Streets. 
Petition of Stephen E. Westcott for a sewer in 

Purchase street; to Committee on Sewers. 

INTENTIONS TO BUILD. 

The following notices of intentions to build were 
presented and severally referred to the Committee 

on Streets. 

of James Monks on corner of Seventh and K streets ; 
of J. W. Carter, on corner Of Causeway and Lcverett 
streets; of B. M. Doraty, on Medford, between Bev- 
erly and Charlestown streets; of M. Pollock, Eighth, 
near Dorchester street; Chamberlain & Mar-ton. ai 
bany, between Rochester and Genesee street-; Wm. 
Peard, Fourth, between F. and Dorchester street-; 
Smith & Jacobs, Wareham street, between Harrison 
avenue and Albany street; Melville Ayres, Harrison 
ave., near Northampton street; M. H.'sbuk. London, 
between Porter and Bennington streets; Rumrill & 
Stanton, Hampden street; Joseph Small, Dartmouth 
street, between Warren avenue and Apple ton street ; 
Geo. E. Shackley, Broadway, between H and I 
streets; the same party, Dove, between E and F 
streets; Daniel Denny, Sixth, opposite Ontario street : 
Morton & Chesley, Tremont, Clarendon and Mont- 
gomery streets ; the same party, Plympton, between 
Harrison avenue and Albany "street; John Murphy, 
Third, between Second and A stieets. 

APPOINTMENTS. 

Joseph s. Blye, Funeral Undertaker: Frederick 
Housman, member of Engine Company No. 14 ; John 
Durling, member of Hook and Ladder Company No, .'i ; 
William Morrel, police officer without pay, for duty 
at the shops of the Boston & Providence Railroad; 
Wm. E. Richardson, police officer without pay, for 
duty in the Church Street District. 

ORDERS OF NOTICE. 

To the Metropolitan Railroad Company that the 
Board will consider, Monday, Sept. 21, the expedi- 
ency of granting the petition to lay a track on Shaw 
mut avenue from Oak street to' the West Roxbury 
line. 

On petition of Charles E. Elliot for Sewer on Mount 
Pleasant avenue, and on Forest street. 

To the Grand Lodge of Masons in Massachusetts, 
and others, that a portion of Tremont street is to be 
discontinued. 

To the abutters upon the proposed location of the 
Marginal Freight Railroad, that the Board will con- 
sider, on Monday, Sept. 21, the expediency of granting 
the petition for the same. 

COMMUNICATIONS. 

A communication was received from the City Phy- 
sician in regard to public drains, suggesting that if 
it has been thought proper to place the removal of 
the contents of the vaults under stringent rules and 
limitations, with equal propriety the same kind of 
material wherever found should lie put under similar 
or at least sufficient and proper restrictions as to 
its removal. 

A communication was received from the Metro- 
politan Railroad Co. accepting the location granted 
by the Board of Aldermen, Aug. 24th. 

REPORTS OF COMMITTEES. 

Alderman White, from the Committee on Licenses, 
reported leave to withdraw upon the petitions of 54 
applicants for licenses as victuallers and inn-holders, 
as follows; Catherine Ahern, .">7 Albanv street ; Daniel 
Ahem, 92 A and l(i Third streets ; Lewis R. Allard, 82 
Albany street ; John H. Parry, ill).") Fourth street ; Mrs. 
Anna S. Rest, 50 Hampden street; John Rleiler, 1 
Heath place; Joshua Brothers, 24 Pleasant street; 
Nathan Curran, 11- Linden place; Peter A. Cunning- 
bam, 558 Second street; Lawrence Cuddy, 2 Swell 
street: Lydia R. Cottee, 1404 Washington street; 
James F. Oolgan ; 452 Federal street ; Patrick Cheevers, 
112 Ruggles street; Michael (arney, 307 Federal 
street: Dennis Driscoll, 74 West Deilham street; John 
J. Dowd, corner Vernon street and Shawmut avenue : 
Patrick Devine, 801 Federal street South Boston; 
James O. Fallon, ;i!»0 Commercial street : David J. 
Farnham, 1788 Washington street; Thos. J. Fay, KM 
Federal street: Charles A. Fracker, 1340 Tremont; 
Frank & Koostler, 40C Faneuil Hall square; Michael 
Harney, 01 Fourth street ; Daniel Ilavey , 172 Pyncheon 
street;' Edward Hiel, 85 Pyncheon street: Joseph 
Josser, S02 Washington street: Patrick Reams, Grove 



PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



21 



Hall avenue; Samuel Kurz, 25 Eliot street; E. A. 
Landen, 1545 Tremont street; James Lyons, 290 North 
street; Wm. Me.Elroy, 13 Channing street; James 
McDonald, 84 and 86 Fourth street; Bernard McQuil- 
len, 183 Friend street; Coleman Mullen, 043 Harrison 
avenue; Henry Noll, 321 North street; Ellen Noon, 
15!) Beach street; John Norton, 12 Quincy street; 
Joanna O'Connell, '273 Federal street ; Thomas Pender, 
6 Guild row; Peter M. Pickart and A. Davis, 1 Pitts 
street, Michael Reardon, 116 Broad street : Wm. Riley, 
55 South street; P. H. Roos, '2 Winter place; J. E. 
Saunders, 345 .North street; Jacob Smoltz, Armory 
street; J. Simmonds, 8 Traverse street; Daniel Sulli- 
van, 38G Commercial street ; (lark Tripp, 40 Richmond 
street; Charles Whippeman, 18 Causeway street; 
John White, 5 Lehigh street; Michael Woods, 553 
Harrison avenue; John Woods. 88 Portland street; 
R. H. Veaton, 87 Sudbury street; Anna Pine (ale, 
beer, &c.,) 414 Tremont street. Report accepted 

Also, in favor of the petitions of 26 applicants for 
the same. Report accepted. 

Also in flavor of the approval of certain transfers 
of licenses; also in favor of the petition of Murphy & 
Co. for leave to deal in second band articles; also in 
favor of the approval of certain hack licenses. Re- 
ports accepted. 

Also in favor of granting the application of Henry 
Willard for leave to give dramatic representations at 
"Willard's Theatre;" Report accepted. 

Also recommending the adoption of the following 
orders, which passed. 

Ordered, That notice be sent to the License Commis- 
sioners of this county that the Board objects to the 
licenses proposed to be issued to Patrick Kearns, 
(irove Hall avenue; Coleman Mullen, 643 Harrison 
avenue; Ellen Noon, 15!) Beach street; Thomas Pen- 
der, (i Guild row; Julia Stacey, 148 Merrimac street; 
Charles Whippeman, 18 Causeway street. 

Ordered, That the license heretofore granted to 
Daniel J. Courtney, as a victualler at 12 Beach street, 
be revoked for cause. 

Alderman Talbot, from the Committee on streets, 
reported no action necessary upon certain notices of 
intention to build. Accepted. 

Alderman Messinger, from the Committee on Health, 
reported in favor of abating certain nuisances, and 
also to assess others. Accepted 

WIDENING OK TREMONT STREET. 

Alderman Talbot, in behalf of a majority of the 
Committee on Streets, reported leave to withdraw up- 
on the petition of George A. Gardner and others that 
Tremont street be made eighty feet wide from Boyl- 
ston street to the Boston & Albany Railroad Bridge. 

Aldermen Paul stated that as the report of the com- 
mittee had only been determined upon at 2 o'clock no 
time was ottered for preparing a minority report ; and 
it was to be regretted that the whole Board was not 
present to discuss the matter. It was not a question 
which was narrowed down to the mere widening of 
Tremont street; it was a question as to whether the 
City Government would inaugurate a liberal policy in 
regard to improvements, or continue to go on in the, 
same narrow policy in this matter as in years past, 
the result of which had been that it had cost the city 
two dollars for every one that it should have cost. 

It was argued that it was now too late to make the 
change from 60 to 81) feet; but it was never too late to 
mend, and the wiser policy was not in providing 
merely for the demands of to-day. The property now 
taken'covered about 33,000 feet," and to extend it to 80 
feet would require 34,000 feet. The extra expense of 
making the street 80 feet in width would not be over 
titty per cent, additional to the expense of laying it 
out 00 feet in width; thus requiring about if 375*,000 to 
obtain a broad avenue. 

Economy he was in favor of as much as any one 
could be, but it should be a proper economy. The 
economy practised in regard to widening streets in 
years past had been a false economy. An instance of 
this economy was to be seen in the ease of Scollay's 
Building, which could have been purchased by the 
city at one time for $40,000, but which could hardly be 
obtained now for less than $200,000. The amount of 
travel was very rapidly increasing upon Tremont 
street and the same reasons could operate here as in 
the case of Federal street, where one great reason 
which had induced the committee to advise a 70 foot 
street was that upon a GO foot street there could not be 
with two car tracks, room for two wagons to pass on 
each side. The question in this case was perhaps set- 
tled by this Board and argument might be neebless, 
but the members would see their mistake within ten 
years. 



Alderman Richards believed that at this time this 
work should not be put off until another year, and 
he favored the majority report of the committee. The 
part of Tremont street proposed to be widened was 
peculiarly situated so far as other portions of the 
city were concerned, probably half of the travel 
leaving it at Boylston street for the Providence depot, 
and half of the travel the other way leaving it at 
Dover street. 

Alderman Braman, though not having heard the 
whole of the discussions upon the subject, desired to 
hear the question fully discussed, and was entirely 
in favor of freedom of communication. If for the sum 
of $375,000 Tremont street could be made eighty feet 
wide from Dover street to the Common, it was to be 
hoped that there would be no hesitation about it. 
For the sake of testing the question, he would move, 
that the report be recommitted with instructions to 
report that Tremont street be widened to eighty feet. 

Alderman Messinger hoped the motion would not 
prevail, and opposed any further widening, believing 
60 feet to be wide enough for all purposes of travel. 
Instead of costing only $375,000 to extend to 80 feet, it 
would more probably be twice that amount. The 
subject had been fully considered, and people outside 
were satisfied as the "matter now stood. This part of 
the South End was mainly residences, and less occu- 
pied by manufactories, and broad lines of transporta- 
tion were less needed. 

Alderman Talbot said that already there were a 
number of avenue sleading to the South-End, and it 
would seem that for business purposes sixty feet was 
a sufficient width for this street. And if the travel 
should become crowded very soon, there was an 
alternative in the extention of Shawmut avenue to 
Boylston street. 

Alderman White saw no reason for widening to 
more than sixty feet. It was now quite too late, as 
some people had already got their buildings moved 
back and painted in view of a sixty foot street. In 
regard to cost, he judged that the land damages would 
require $700,000, which, with other expenses, would 
make the whole cost of widening the street $1,200,000. 
On the petition there probally some ten or tifteen of 
our principal tax payers ; and the party who had 
circulated it had worked three weeks to get people t<> 
sign it. In regard to Federal street, his own observa- 
tion had shown that more teams would pass a given 
spot in an hour on that street than passed through 
this part of Tremont street in five or six days. It was 
very unusual to see heavy teams south of Boylston 
street. There would not be found for the next thirty 
years a store on this part Of the street doing a business 
of $50,000 ; and merchants would genera ly say that 
they would prefer to do business on a street forty 
feet wide than on a sixty foot street. 

Alderman Paul further opposed the adoption of the 
report, and favored the motion to recommit. 

The Board refused to recommit!, by a vote of 3 yeas 
to 7 nays, as follows : 

Yeas— Messrs. Braman, Paul, Pratt — 3. 

Nays— Messrs. Fairbanks, Messinger, Richards, Sea- 
ver, Talbot, White, Woodman— 7. 

The question then being taken on the acceptance of 
the report, it was passed by the following vote. 

Yeas — Messrs. Braman, Fairbanks, Messinger, 
Pratt, Richards, Seaver, Talbot, White, Woodman, 
—9. 

Nays — Paul— 1. 

Alderman Messinger afterwards moved to take 
from the table the resolution limiting the widening 
of Tremont street to 00 feet, which being agreed to 
the same was indeiinitly postponed, upon the motion 
of the Same gentlemen. 

ORDERS ADOPTED. 

Ordered, That the Chief-of-Police, in consultation 
with the Commissioner on the Church Street District, 
be authorized to close against public travel such of 
the streets on and in the vincinity of the Church Street 
District as they deem expedient during the progress 
of the work in said district. 

Ordered, That the Committee on Bridges be author- 
ized to expend a sum not exceeding $2000 in repairing 
the roadway over Chelsea Street Bridge, said sum 
to be transferred for that purpose from the "reserved 
fund" to the appropriation for Chelsea Street Bridge. 

Ordered, That the court leading from Auburn street 
between Ruggles and Vernon streets, be hereafter 
called and known as Tilden place, and that the Super- 
intendent of Streets be directed to place street signs 
upon, and number said place. 

Ordered, That the Superintendent of Streets be au- 
thorized to grade Sixth street, between Federal and 



oo 



PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



Foundry street3, and a portion of Foundry street 
with ashes. 

Ordered, That the Chief of Police bo directed to no- 
tify the owners and abutters on Trenton street, be- 
tween Mendon and Prescott street, to furnish edge- 
stones to support the sidewalk, and to lay their 
sidewalks vt ith brick. 

Orderd, Thai the Chief of Police be ami he hereby 
is directed to notify the »\\ net- of the estate corner of 
Garden and Phillip streets, to remove, within three 
da\ s the obstructions placed by him or ins agents on 
said street ; and in default thereof the chief of Police 
is hereby further directed to cause said obstructions 
to be removed at the expense Of said owner, accord- 
inn to law. 

Ordered, That until otherwise ordered the Chief of 
Police be autorized and designated to issue permits 
for blasting rocks w ithin the' limits of the city, under 
the statutes of 1868, chapter 201. 

Ordered, That the Committee on Health be author- 
ized to remove, by dredging or otherwise, the deposit 
from sewers and other sources at the angle of the sea- 
wall near the corner of Beacon and Charles streets, at 
an expense not exceeding $1000. 

Adjourned. 



Proceedings of Board of Aldermen, 



SEPT. 7, 1868. 



The Board of Aldermen held there regular meet- 
ing at 4 o'clock, P. JVJ. His Honor the Mayor in the 
chair. 

PETITIONS PRESENTED AND KEFEKRED. 

Petition of E. W. James and others that the dock 
at the foot of Poplar street be dredged out. Remon- 
strance of Burrill & Whitney and others against the 
proposed erection of a stalile on Second and Dove 
streets; to Committee on Health. 

Petition of James Sturgis and others that Walnut 
avenue be widened on the Haskins estate; petition of 
D. K. Willis and others that a portion of Appleton 
street be accepted ; to Committee on Streets. 

Petition of J. E. Adams and others for construc- 
tion of a drawbridge over Roxbury Canal at Albany 
street; to Committee on Bridges. 

Petition of Job A. Turner that Webster avenue he 
repaved; to Committee on Paving. 

Petition of Hattie F. Ellis for hearing on her claim 
for damages caused by defect in sidewalk; to Com- 
mittee on Claims. 

Petition of John E. Durgin to be paid for damages 
sustained by a projecting tree in Hudson street ; to 
Committee on Claim's. Petition of Hervey, Johnson 
& Co., for leave to drain their estate into the Tremont 
street sewer; to Committee on Sewers. 

INTENTIONS TO BUILD. 

Thomas Hill, 86 Baxter street, South Boston ; John 
C. Tucker, 108 Merrimac street; J. P. Paul * Co., Tre- 
mont, between Paul and Chapman streets; Draper & 
Hall, Dedham street, between Shaw mut avenue and 
Tremont street; Alden Avery, Shawmut avenue, cor- 
ner Sterling street; John Du'pee, Harrison avenue, be- 
tween Plvmpton and Dedham streets; Nathaniel J. 
Bradlee, Commonwealth avenue, between Clarendon 
and Berkeley streets; J. L. Bowers, Telegraph, near 
Dorchester street; Parker & Geddis, K, below Ninth 
street; H. B. Sargent, corner Washington and shaw- 
mut avenue: X. <). Hart, Wareham street; G. F. 
Meacham, 18 Broad Street; A. Myerson, corner Tre- 
montand Prentiss streets; Faulkner A: Clarke, Beacon 
street; John Kelley, Henchman street; Joseph Cleve. 
Eustis, between Prescott and Hampden streets; L. F. 
Whitney, Orchard, near Eustis street ; Henry B. Strat- 
ton, Tremont street, corner of Warren ton place; S. S. 
Perkins, Eliot, between Warrenton and Carver Streets : 
J.F.Haines, Saratoga, between Marion and Brook 
streets: P. H. McGlynn. Millmont street. 



APPOINTMENTS. 

Henry 8. P. Rollins, special police officer without 

pay, for duty in the Church Street District. John 
Collins do., do., do. 

COMMUNICATIONS, 

A communication was received from the Auditor 
Of Accounts submitting the regular monthly exhibit 
of the general and special appropriations for the 
present financial year 1868-69, as shown in the books 
ol the office sept, i, 1868, including the September draft, 
being live months' payment of the financial year. 

The amount of the "general appropaiations, includ- 
ing revenue, as shown by the exhibit, is $7,098,776 12. 
The tot:tl amount expended is $2,256,255 78. The 
balance unexpended i> $4,84*2,520 34, 

The amount of special appropriations including 
revenue, as shown by the exhibit, is $2,741,823 71. 
The total amount expended is $836,985, 80. The total 
amount of balance unexpended is $1,904,837 81. 

The follwing is a table of the total appropriations 
made from time to time by the City Council, for un- 
completed public buildings and public works, May l, 
1868, the objects for which they were made, amount 
expended, balance unexpended, including the Sep- 
tember draft : 

Object Loan, Revenue, fj n _ 

of or from Expended. 

Appropriations. Transfers. expended. 

Albany St. Bridge, 

(appropriation). . $72,000 00 $71,937.33 $62 47 

Albany St. Grading, 

(loan) 40.000 00 26,482 32 13,517 68 

Back Bay and Sur- 
face Drain'ge(loan 
and Revenue).... 149,050 00 105,817 85 43,232 15 

Central Charity Bu- 
reau(Revenue and 
loans) 191,622 40 141,311 24 50,311 16 

Chestnut Hill Drive- 
way (loans 160,000 00 85,062 54 74,937 46 

Cestuut Hill Reser- 
voir (loans) 1,700,000 00 1.066,351 97 633,648 03 

Dedham St. Grad- 
ing (loan) 23,000 00 21,638 11 1,36189 

Devonshire St. (loan) 300,000 00 209,985 00 90,015 00 

Dover Street (loans, 
revenue and trans- 
fers) 327,117 36 326.508 25 519 11 

New Lunatic Hospi- 
tal (loans and ap- 
propriation ) 148,000 00 38,867 82 109,132 18 

Oliver Street (reve- 
nue 35,466 08 252,814 03 * 

Primary Schoolh'se 
Charter Street 
(loan) 28,000 00 11,937 00 16,063 00 

Soldiers' and Sail- 
ors' Monument, 
on Boston Com- 
mon, (appropria- 
tion.) 40,000 00 16,326 03 23,670 97 

Stony Brook Sewer 
balance Roxbury 
appropriation)..'. 23,688 67 10,267 97 13,420 70 

Station House, Wd. 
13 (transfer) 8,000 00 5,840 60 2,159 40 

station House, Wd. 
15, (transfer ami 
loan) 48,500 00 8,76180 39,738 20 

Wells Schoolhouse 

(loans) 106,000 00 87,46103 18,538 97 

$3,400,144 51 $2,487,461 09 1,130.331 37 
Advanced by 
Treasurer 21 7,347 95 

$3,617,792 46 

*Adv. by the Treasurer, $217,347 95. 

REPORT OF COMMITTEES. 

Alderman Talbot, from the Committee on Streets, 
reported leave to withdraw on the petition of Law- 
rence Richards, that the wall of house No. 16 Beach 
street be finished with face brick. Report accepted. 

Alderman James, from the Joint Standing Commit- 
tee on Public Lands, reported leave to withdraw on 
the petition of Ira L. Moore and others for a passage- 
way in rear of the reserved lot on West Canton street. 
Report accepted. 

The same Committee reported leave to withdraw on 
the petition of L. N. Porter for a modification of cer- 



PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



23 



tain conditions of sale of land on Northampton street. 
Report accepted. 

Alderman Mossinger, from the Committee on Health 
reported that no further action is required on the re- 
monstrance of Thomas i). Kendrick and others against 
a wooden stable now in process of erection on .Lenox 
street. Report accepted. 

Alderman White, from the Committee on Licenses, 
reported leave to withdraw ou the petition of Win. 
Kerr, :i Qulncy place, for license as a victualler. Re- 
port accepted. The same Committee reported an or- 
der, which was passed, that the license heretofore 
granted to Charles Burley as victualler and innholder 
at 133 Last Dover street, be revoked for cause. Order 
passed. The same Committee reported leave to with- 
draw on the petition of Louis Sommera, 1038 Tremont 
street, for victualler's license. Report accepted. 

Alderman .lames, from the Committee on Public 
Buildings, submitted a report in print on the subject 
of enlarging the Court House of Suffolk county; also 
an order authorizing the Committee on the part of the 
Board of Aldermen to make the enlargments and al- 
terations in pursuance of the plans annexed, the same 
being at an estimated expense of $191,000. Order 
laid over under the rule. 

Alderman Talbot, from the Committee on Streets, 
reported no action necessary upon sundry notices of 
intentions to build presented at the last, meeting. Re- 
port accepted. 

Also, order of notice (Sept. 21st) to Boston Water 
Power Company and others upon the acceptance of 
Appleton street", between clarendon street and Colum- 
bus avenue. Order passed. 

Also, upon petition of George Curtis for building a 
drawbridge across Roxbury canal, recommending its 
reference to the Committee on Bridges. Report ac- 
cepted and petition referred. 

Also, order of notice (Sept. 21) upon the notice of 
intention to build, by Horace 11. Sargent, on corner 
of Washington street and Shawmut avenue. Order 
adopted. 

Also, order of notice (Sept. 21) to Boston Water 
Power Co. and others, upon the acceptance of Dart- 
mouth street, between Warren street and Columbus 
avenue. Order passed. 

Also, order of notice (Sept. 21) to Boston Water 
Power Co. and others, upon the laying' out of West 
Canton street between Columbus and Warren av- 
enues. Order passed. 

Also, order of notice (sept. 21) upon extending 
Columbus avenue, eighty feet in width, from Fer- 
dinand to Church street. Order passed. 

Also, order of notice (Sept. 21) upon the widening 
of Tennyson street between Church street and the 
proposed extension of Columbus avenue. Order 
passed. 

Also, an order for the laying out and extending of 
Avon place, and giving notice to the abutters. Read 
once. 

Also, several orders for the laying out of streets in 
the Church street territory, viz., Shawmut, Berlin, 
Piedmont, Marion, South Cedar streets and Grenville 
place. Bead once. 

A lso, an order of notice to the abutters upon Temple 
place concerning the widening thereof. 

Also, an order for the widening of Matthews street. 
Read once. 

Alderman Paul, from the .Joint Standing Committee 
on Water, reported in favor of granting the petition 
for the establishment of drinking fountains for horses 
and other animals; and submitted an order that the 
Cochituate Water Hoard be requested to erect in such 
localities as they may deem that the public interest 
requires, not exceeding twenty fountain hydrants 
which shall furnish drinking facilities for men and 
beasts, two in South Boston, two in East Boston, two 
in Boston Highlands, and the others in the city proper. 
Order laid over. 

Ah lernian Messinger, from the Committee on Health, 
reported in favor of abating sundry nuisances. Report 
accepted. 

Alderman White, from the Committee on the Fire 
Department, reported in favor of granting upon the 
usual conditions the request of Kimball & Brackett to 
store burning fluid on T wharf. Report accepted. 

OltllERS ADOPTED. 

Order, That there be paid to J. Wiley Edmands and 
Gardner Colby $18,000 for land taken' and damages 
occasioned by the widening of Federal street. 

Order, That the Chief of Police be directed to notify 
the owners and abutters on Meridian street, between 
Eutaw and White streets, to furnish edgestones to 
support the sidewalk, and to lav their sidewalks with 



brick and driveways with flat stones, within 20 davs. 
That the Chief Of Police be directed to notify the 
owners and abutters on Harrison avenue, between 
Northampton and Eustis streets, to furnish new edge- 
stones to support the sidewalk, and to lav their side- 
walks with brick, within 20 days. 

Order, That the Committee on Ordinances be and 
they are hereby instructed to report an ordinance 
regulating the cleaning of private cesspools at Mich 
times and in such manner as the Superintendent of 
Health or his Assistant shall direct. 

Order, That the Treasurer be and he is hereby au- 
thorized to cancel the bonds numbering 2220, 2221, 
2222, which were given for land on Wareham street 
November 24th, 1866, but have been forfeited to the 
city tor non-compliance with the conditions of sale; 
and that the Superintendent of Public Lands be and 
i> hereby directed to take possession of the above 
land to the use of the said city of Boston. 

Order, That the Chief of Police be and lie is hereby 
directed to notify the abutters on the southerly side 
of Washington street, between Centre and Gardner 
streets, to remove within ten days of the date of this 
order the fences and other obstructions erected by 
them within the bounds of said street; and if said 
fences and obstructions are not removed within the 
time herein specified, then the Chief of Police is 
hereby further ordered to cause said fences and ob- 
structions to be removed at the expense of the owners 
thereof. 

Order, That due notice be given that the Board will 
consider, on Monday, Sept, 14, the expediency of 
allowing Messers. Fearing & Renfrew to erect a stable 
for more than four horses on Dove street, between 
E and F streets. 

Order of notice to heirs of Nathan Watson, the heirs 
of Sarah Hey ward, William H. Milton and Thomas 
Slocum, the heirs of Benjamin Burrill and Mrs. 
Harriet E. Burrill, to remove buildings anil obstruc- 
tions projecting over the lines of Warren street. 

Order, That the Superintendent of streets be au- 
thorized to repair the bridge over the Creek at Long- 
wood avenue, at an estimated cost of three hundred 
dollars. 

Order, That the Superintendent of Sewers be au- 
thorized to construct a common sewer in Mount 
Pleasant avenue and Forest street. 

Order, That the Chief Engineer be authorized to 
purchase, under the direction of the Committee on 
the Fire Department, one pair of horses for Engine 
Company No. 8, at an expense of $850. 

Order, That any and all bills for labor or supplies 
furnished by the Health Department to any other 
department of the Government shall be charged to the 
appropriation of the department which is benefited 
thereby, and the receipt shall be credited to the 
Health Department. 

Order, That the order from the Superintendent of 
Health to furnish ashes to the Paving Department to 
grade Camden and Northampton streets be so far 
modified as to conform to the preceeding order. 

Adjourned. 



Proceedings of Board of Aldermen, 



SEPT. 14, 1868. 



The regular meeting of the Board of Aldermen 
took place at the usual hour, His Honor Mayor 
Shurtleff in the chair. 

PETITIONS PRESENTED AND REFERRED. 

Petition of M. F. Cook and others that Richmond 
street be paved with wood; of Hiram De Luce to lie 
compensated for damages incurred by change of grade 
in Second street; of C. H. Graves for leave to put a 
pipe under sidewalk of 35 Hawkins street; of Samuel 
A. Williams and others that cross walks be laid at 
various points on Meridian street; of D. Chamberlin 
for leave to build a bulk head and cellar doorway in 
Sidewalk at 74 Canal street; of South Boston Rail- 
road Co. for extension of their location; of John 
Albree and others that the ebgestones, gutters, &c, 
in West Concord street be relaid; of George Heaton 



24 



PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



and ale that Culvert street be filled up and graded ; of 

Charles E. Horsey and others that suitable cross-walks 
be laid on Broadway, near E el reet ; referred severally 
to the Committee «>n Paving. 

Petition of George A. Simmons and others for a 
sewer from Pyncbon street to Cedar and Highland 
streets; ofW. L. Chadbourne and others for a sewer 
in Ball street; referred to the Committee on Sewers. 

Petition of Boston Lead Co. and others for a bridge 
oxer 1,'oxbury (anal; to Committee on Bridges. 

Petition of George P. French and others that Ken- 
dall Street be extended; to the Committee on Streets. 

Petitions severally of P. P. Ingalls and 25 others, Of 
W. K. Bartlett and '27 others, of John Lyons and 
others, and of P. Holly and 10 others, for better ward 
accommodations in Ward Seven; to the Committee 
on Public Buildings. 

Remonstrance of Ignatius J. Sullivan and others 
against the erection of a stable on E, P, and Dove 
streets. 

Petition of John I). Philbrick for the use of Faneuil 
Hall for the use of the Massachusetts Teachers' Asso- 
ciation, Oct. (>; to Committee on Faneuil Hall. 

INTENTIONS TO BUILD. 

Of C. H. Graves, 35 Hawkins street ; of J. T. Craft, 97 
and 99 Beverly street; of J. B. Aldrieh, 51 Anderson 
street; of J. Ii. Barker, 103 and 105 Eliot street; of 
Richard Power & Son, 68 and 70 Beverly street; of 
Small & Post, Dartmouth place; of A.W. Hason, 
Sherman street, between Dale and Ottawa streets; of 
Holbrook & Harlow, Fourth street, between and 
P streets; of Frame & Jordan, 122 London street, East 
Boston; ot'D. L. Street, Marcella, near Vale street; of 
W. A. & S. G. Low, Rochester street, west of Albany 
street; of Patrick Egan, Cabot street; of David Per- 
kins, 52 Pinckney street. 

RESOLVES PASSED. 

Resolve and order to lay out and widen Sbawmut 
street at an estimated cost of $30,000. 

Resolve to lay out Marion street (no expense.) 

Resolve to lay out and widen Piedmont street 
($17,000). 

Resolve to lay out and widen South Cedar street 
($40,000). 

Resolve to lay out Grenville place (no expense). 

Resolve to lay out and extend Matthews street 
($10,500). 

Resolve discontinuing a portion of Tremont street, 
on the easterly side, between Boylston and the South- 
erly side of the Wintbrop Schooihouse, or which was 
taken and laid out as a portion of said street by resolve 
passed June 6, 18(58. 

Resolve to lay out and extend Avon place ($80,000). 
[See orders.] 

ORDERS OF NOTICE RECOMMITTED. 

The following orders of notice returnable this day 
were severally recommitted : To the Charles Street 
Baptist Society, corner Charles and Mt. Vernon streets 
(no objection)". To Grand Lodge of Masons in Mass- 
achusetts, and others, notice of discontinuance ofa 
portion of Tremont street, (remonstrance of Elizabeth 
G. Townsend in writing). To Peter Walsh, notice of 
intention to widen Moon street. To Fearing & Ren- 
frew, notice of hearing concerning leave to build a 
stable, for more than four horses, on Dove street, be- 
tween E and F streets, (Messrs. Donahoe, Sullivan, 
Healey and others appeared in support of the remon- 
strance of Ignatias J. Sullivan and others against the 
same) . 

LAID UPON THE TAHLE. 

Resolve to lay out and widen Berlin street ($25,000.) 
Resolve to make alterations in County Court House 
at an expense of $191,000, and to procure a loan there- 
for. 

TAKEN FROM THE TABLE. 

Order directing the Committee upon Fourth of July 
to report the amount and character of the expendi- 
tures for that occasion. Indefinitely postponed. 

Order for Engine House and Armory on Bowker 
street. Amended by changing the words "Engine Co. 
No. 8" to "a horse hose company," and passed. 

Order to assess betterments on Bowker street, as 
follows, the sums so assessed not exceeding one-half 
of the amount of the adjudged benefit to the said es- 
tates by tne widening of the said street : 

Estate of E. H. Ashcroft, $3545; of same, 245G; of 
W. H. Wentworth, 6053; of Reuben Rice & (Jo.. 658; 
of Esther Ann McCutrheon, wife of James McCutCh- 
eon, 638; of City of Boston, 2098 ; of same, 4825; of heirs 
of David Parker, 1325; ofC. C. Paine, 1113, of Allen 



Beach, 1642; of Jonathan Jones, (i87; of Frederick 
smith, 723; of Moses B. Wildes, 1584 ; of same, 1931; of 
Erastus B. Badger, 2289; of John Trull, l<;44; of Edwin 
Bowker, Charles Torrey and Franklin Torrey, 4050; 
making a total of 32,261. 
oiiler passed. 

REPORTS OF COMMITTEES. 

Alderman Talbot, from the Committee on Streets, 
reported in favor of laying out ami extension of Avon 
place. The Committee state as follows ; 

This laying out, (it is understood between the Com- 
mittee and the petitioners,) if it is done at all, is to be 
done under the betterment law, and the total estimat- 
ed expense attending the same is to be assessed upon 
the estates benefited. 

Previous to the drawing of any plans, and the mak- 
ing of estimates, the petitioners were required to 
procure a bond of the estate of Jordan & Marsh on 
Chauncv street, a large portion of which will be re- 
quired for the contemplated extension. This has been 
done, the bond running to the city at the price of 
$85,000. The number of feet of land required from 
this estate is 27(J3, leaving 2034 feet between the Me- 
chanic*' Building and the new street belonging to 
the city. 

The only parties interested who oppose the exten- 
sion of this street are the proprietors of the Second 
Church. Their vestry covers a portion of the land 
to be taken. Their opposition, if we rightly under- 
stand them, is upon the ground that, for a number of 
years to come the believe that their present location 
Mill be well adapted to the wants of their society. In 
view of the fact that, during the present year! four 
churches on the east side of Washington street, and in 
this immediate vicinity, have been sold for business 
purposes, we leave it for the Board to judge whether 
the objection made by them is tenable. 

In conclusion we would say that the opening of this 
street in connection with Temple place, will afford 
better facilities to reach the business part of the city 
from Tremont street than are now had through Win- 
ter and Summer streets. 

Alderman Talbot also submitted an order author- 
izing the Treasurer to borrow $115,000 to provide for 
the expense oi this extension, which was passed. 

The report was accepted, and the order adopted 
in connection with a resolve upon the same subject. 

Alderman Richards, from the Committee on Public 
Buildings, reported upon the recommittal of the re- 
port upon heating apparatus for the City Hall, that 
it was for the interest of the city to repair the present 
boilers, or else provide two tubular boilers as rec- 
commended in the previous report. Report accepted. 

Also, upon the subject of repairing Eastern Avenue 
Wharf, that the repairs are needed, and, therefore, 
recommending the passage of the order. Report ac- 
cepted and order passed. 

Aldermen White, from the Committee on Licenses, 
reported in favor of granting certain innholders' and 
victuallers' licenses; also in favor of granting certain 
transfers of wagon licenses ; also leave to keep bill- 
iard table; also leave to keep an intelligence office, 15 
Summer street; also license to keep second hand 
articles. Accepted. 

Also in favor of revoking, for cause, the wagon li- 
censes of Steele & Robinson, Jason O. Elms, Peter 
Campbell, and Daniel Bastou. Accepted. 

Also leave to withdraw on petition of John Porter, 
438 and 440 Bremen street, and M. J. Holland, Union 
Park street, for licenses as common victuallers. Ac- 
cepted. 

Alderman Messinger, from the Committee on 
Health, reported an order to abate sundry nuisances. 
Adopted. 

Also an order to revoke, for cause, the licenses, of 
Dennis Gillon and John McKenna of Somerville, for 
the collection of bones and other refuse matter. 
Adopted. 

Aldermen Talbot, from the Committee on Streets, 
reported no action necessary upon sundry notices of 
intention to build, presented at the last meeting. 
Accepted. 

Also, order of notice upon the widening of Berlin 
street and Knox street. Accepted. 

ORDERS PASSED. 

Order to pay Michael and Peter Riley $364 for dam- 
ages to their estate 532 Sbawmut avenue, by the 
raising of said avenue. 

Order to pay heirs of Patrick Farington $804 for 
damages to estate 534 and 536 Sbawmut avenue by 
raising the grade of said avenue. 

Order directing the Chief of Police to notify owner 



PROCEEDHSTOS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



of estate 59 and 61 Summer street to remove cellar 
doors, ami replace the Hyatt Light coverings to the 
vault under said sidewalk. 

Order directing the Chief of Police to notify owner 
of estate on northeast corner of Second and 1 streets, 
to close bulkhead recently constructed. 

Order to pay to the trustees of the First German 
Methodist-Epispocal Society $2,ii00 for damages to 
their estate by the raising of the grade of shawniut 
avenue. 

Order authorizing the Superintendent of Public 
Buildings, under the direction of the Committee on 
Public Buildings, to hire Franklin Hail, on Broad- 
way, for ward-room purposes, the expense to be 
charged to the appropriation for Public Buildings. 

Order to pay to Eunice M. and Eliza Gridley $12,000 
in settlement of damages caused by the widening 
of Tivmont street. 

Order to pay .Mrs. M. E. R. Jones $16,000 in set- 
tlement of damages occasioned by the widening of 
Tremont street. 

Order to pay Anvos J. Dean $605 for damages to 
estate 28 Buggies street, by the raising of the grade 
of said street. 

Order requesting the Mayor to discharge the mort- 
gage given to the City by James Berwick, October 1, 
is.")i;, on a parcel of land in Framinghain, the note ami 
interest having been paid. 

Order authorizing the Committee on Bridges to 
widen Federal street Bridge, exclusive of the draw, 
twenty feet on the easterly si le, at an expense not 
exceeding $19,000, to be Charged to the appropriation 
for widening Federal street. Also order authorizing 
treasurer to borrow the same. 

Order authorizing the Committee on Public Build- 
ings to replace the boilers in the City Hall with two 
new wrougni iron boilers, at an expense not exceed- 
ing $3000, to be charged to the appropriation for 
public buildings. 

Onler that the Committee on Public Buildings, on 
the part of the Board, consider the expense of erecting 
a suitable building upon the land connected with the 
Boston Jail, foi the accommodation of the Municipal 
Court and the criminal session of the Superior Court. 

Alderman Messinger, in introducing this order, in 
connection with the consideration of the resolve to 
expend $191,000 in an alteration of the County Court 
House, remarked that, in his judgement, a suitable 
building could be put up upon the jail grounds at u 
cost noi exceeding seventy-five thousand dollars, 
which would amply accommodate the courts men- 
tioned. The reasons for such a change would be the 
relief, to a great extent, both inside and out, of the 
Court House, by the removal of the criminal courts, 
and the relief to the community by the removal of 
the disagreeable surrounding of those courts. The 
expense would not be more than a third of the amount 
required by the enlargement of the Court House. The 
subject was one to be thoroughly looked into by the 
committee. 

< )rder passed. 

Order authorizing the construction of a drawbridge 
across Boxbury Canal, so called, at an estimate ex- 
pense of $8000.* 

Adjourned until Monday next at 4 o'clock P. M. 



Proceedings of the Common Council, 



SEPT. 17, 186 8. 



A special meeting of the Common Council was held 
at four o'clock P. M., convened by the Mayor to con- 
sider the subject of extending Avon place, adopting 
means for heating City Hall, and transacting such 
other business as might be presented. President 
Allen occupied the chair. 

RATERS FROM THE BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 

Various petitions were referred in concurrence. 

The Auditor's Monthly Exhibit, Sept. 4th, 1868, was 
placed on tile. 

The report, leave to withdraw, on the petition of L. 
W. Porter for modification of condition of sale of land 
on Northampton street, was accepted iu concurrence. 



The report leave to withdraw on the petition of Mr. 
L. Moore and others, for a passageway in the rear of 
the reserved lot on West Canton street, was accepted 
in concurrence. 

The orders authorizing the cancelling of certain 
bonds for land on Warenam street, and requesting 
the Committee on Ordinances to report an ordinance 
regulating the cleaning of cesspools, were passed in 
concurrence. 

DRINKINGS FOUNTAINS IN THE CITY. 

The report and order in favor of establishing drink- 
ing fountains in different portions of the city came up 
for consideration. 

Mr. Keith of Ward Fifteen moved to amend the or- 
der so that the number of drinking fountains in 
Boston Highlands should be four instead of two. He 
said the Highlands comprised territory two-thirds as 
large as the rest of the city, and two fountains were 
entirely inadequate to the wants of that part of Bos- 
ton. 

Mr Train of Ward Three said that if any change 
were made, the number of fountains in the whole city 
should be increased rather than diminshed by taking 
from one section to add to the number in the High- 
lands. The number reported for that section was fixed 
after conference with ex-Mayor Lewis, one of the 
Water Hoard. It would be better to pass the order 
as it now stands, anil if it were found subsequently 
that the number should be increased for the High- 
lands, an additional order to that effect can be passed. 

Mr. Keith stated that he had not the slightest desire 
to decrease the number of drinking fountains in any 
part of the city. 

Mr. Wadsworth of Ward Four opposed the amend- 
ment, as it would delay the work. An additional 
order could be subsequently adopted, which would 
remedy all deficiencies. 

Mr. Wright of Ward Twelve said he was delighted 
at the introduction of the order for the establishment 
of drinking fountains. Charlestown, generally con- 
sidered a slow coach of a city, had got the start of 
Boston in this respect. The number required in dif- 
ferent sections of this city could not now be accurate- 
ly determined; perhaps South Boston would need 
more than had been allotted to her. If this turns out 
to be the case with any section, the number could be 
easily increased hereafter. The best policy at present 
was to pass the older without amendment. 

Mr. Keith withdrew the amendment, and the order 
was passed in concurrence. 

FKANKLIN 11WA. AS A WARD ROOM. 

The order authorizing the hiring of Franklin Hall 
on Broadway for ward room purposes, until other- 
wise ordered having been read, Mr. Osborn of Ward 
C moved that the order be referred to the Committee 
on Public, Buildings, as there was no evidence to 
show that Ward 7 had not as good a ward room as 
any other ward. 

Mr. Flynn of Ward Seven called for the reading of 
a petition, signed by Mr. Bartlettand others, in aid 
of the purposes of the order, The petition was read, 
when Mr. Flynn continued that the petitioners were 
gentlemen of all parties. The ward room was alto- 
gether insufficient for holding ward meetings; and 
after such meetings had been held, it was rendered 
unfit for the uses of a schoolroom, to which it is put. 

Mr. Wright ot Ward Twelve observed that he sym- 
pathized, in a measure, with the voters of Ward Seven, 
who had to be crowded in their political meetings into 
such a small space as their ward room, so that when 
there was any division of sentiment, the meeting 
necessarily partook somewhat of the character of a 
mob. He suggested to the party so numerous there 
that they have some other hall fortheir political meet- 
tings. For the purposes of a ward room, where the 
people vote and go away, it was not necessary lo 
have a room that would accommodate more than two 
hundred people. Ward Two has some of the same 
difficulties as Ward Seven. 

Mr. Carney of Ward Two said the meetings in his 
•ward of the party to which he belonged were like 
prayer meetings'. Nearly all the persons accustomed 
to make disturbances had joined the organization of 
which the gentleman from Ward Twelve was a 
member. 

Mr. Bishop of Ward Seven observed that polities 
did not enter into this question, which was simply 
one whether 3500 voters should be jammed into a 
mom callable of containing only 200 persons. The 
citizens of Ward Seven, or Of any other ward, have 
a right to demand, as a matter of justice, accommo- 
dations for the transaction of all ward business. 



26 



PROCEEDINGS' OF CITY COUNCIL. 



The order was referred to the Committee on Public 
Buildings. 

TUBULAR BOILERS IN' CITY HAM,. 

The report and order authorizing the Committee on 
Public Buildings i<> replace the present boilers bj i w o 
tubular boilers was opposed by Mr. Rice of ward 
Four, for the same reasons thai be had previously 
urged, namely, thai the tubular boilers were not sale. 
The Harrison boiler can be run with any pressure 
that may be put upon it, which cannot be clone with 
any other boiler. Mr. Bice moved to strike out of the 
Order the words "wrought iron" and insert" Harri- 
son boiler," and increase the appropriation to $(>000. 

Mr. Bean of Ward Eleven, stated that inquiries at 
several establishments where wrought iron boilers 
were used bad convinced him of their perfect safety, 
and to put any other into City Hall would require the 
expense of new piping, ete. 

Mr. Snow of Ward Eleven asked if a certain boiler 
•was not perfectlj sale, and if proposals had not been 
made to the Committee on Public Buildings for put- 
ting in such? 

Mr. Newton of Ward Nine considered tubular 
boilers perfectly safe, as they would have to bear only 
a pressure of eight or ten pounds to the inch, in City 
Hall, whereas they had been subjected to a pressure 
of 150 pounds. 

Mr. Snow read the proposition of Joseph A. Miller 
& Co., to put into City Hall the American Cast Iron 
Boiler, run it through the winter without expense to 
the city, and remove it again, if it does not work sat- 
isfactorily. These boilers in an establishment at 
Creat Fails had done the best of service. He moved 
that the order be recommitted, with instructions to 
hear Mr. Miller. 

Mr. Bean observed that only one of these boilers 
had yet been in use, and the committee did not deem 
it advisable to adopt a boiler for City Hall that so far 
could only be considered an experiment. 

Mr. Woolley remarked that the statements of the 
insecurity of wrought iron boilers were decidedly 
amusing. He knew them to be safe from an experi- 
ence of fourteen years, when under proper care. 

The present cast iron boilers in City Hall had been 
really in use not more than one year, and they were 
now almost entirely worthless. 

Mr. Rice did not consider the numerous casualties 
one the destruction of property caused by the explo- 
sion of tubular boilers as amusing occurrences. The 
explosion at Deer Island was not an event of that 
kind. 

Mr. Pickering of Ward 14 favored the recommit- 
ment, as he had heard Mr. Miller give a very interest- 
ing scientific description of the advantages and 
operation of his American cast-iron boiler at the 
Institute of Technology. 

Mr. Rice said the damages to property from the 
explosions of tubular boilers in 1807 amounted to 
$1,000,000. 

Mr. Wells of Ward Three stated that tubular boilers 
had been placed in all the schoolhouses, and he was 
willing to run the same risks in City Hall, as his 
children were compelled to stand. 

Mr. Wadsworth of Ward Four considered that it 
was necessary to obtain a guarantee against careless- 
ness and incompetency, if that were possible, and 
therefore he was in favor of the motion to recommit. 

Mr. Rice— The Harrison boiler has withstood a 
pressure of 850 pounds to the square inch. 

Mr. Denny of Ward Ten considerd that if the dis- 
cussion went on there would be a fourth boiler pre- 
sented for consideration, and he should vote tor the 
order to obtain tubular boilers, as the risk from their 
use was not sufficient in any case to increase the 
rate of insurance on buildings, as he well knew. 

Mr. Rockwell of Ward Ten observed that the fourth 
boiler had come— the Wiard boiler. In placing boilers 
under the City Hall, none should be adopted in which 
the risk is not reduced to the minimum degree. 

The motion to recommit was lost, as was Mr. Rice's 
motion, and the order passed in concurrence. 

The orders for the laying out and widening of 
Matthews, Piedmont, Shawmut and South Cedar 
Streets, and for the laying out and extension of Avon 
place, were referred to the Committee on Streets on 
the part of the Council. 

The order for the construction of a drawbridge 
over Roxbury Caual at Albany street, and to trans- 
fer from the Reserved Fund not exceeding $X(YM 
therefor, was referred to the Committee on Streets, 
alter a brief discussion, in which Messrs. Morse of 
Ward Thirteen, Train of Ward Three, Ryan of Ward 
Thirteen, Wadsworth of Ward Four, and Bean of 



Ward Eleven, participated. 

The order for the expenditure of not exceeding 
s/jimo in repairing the roadway over Chelsea 8treet 
Bridge, and to transfer said Bum from the reserved 
fund therefor, was referred to the Committee on 

Streets. 

The order for a loan of One hundred and fifteen 
thousand dollars to be appropriated for laying out 
and extending Avon place was laid on the table, 

The order for the widening of the Federal street 
bridge, and for a loan of $19,000 to be appropriated 
therefore, was read once. 

The report in favor of the passage of the order 
authorizing repairs to be made on Eastern Avenue 
Wharf was accepted, but the order was rejected 
by a vote of 12 yeas to 27 nays, after discussion, by 
Messrs. Malone of Ward 2. and Wells ofWard 3, anil 
Driscoll of Ward 5. 

The report and order for plans and estimates 
for a building to be erected on City land on Bowker 
street; said building to contain accommodations 
for Engine Company No. 4, a horse hose company, 
Hook and Ladder No. 1, a feed depot for the fire 
department, and an Armory for the National Lancers, 
were referred to the Committee on Fire Department on 
the part of the Council. 

ORDER PASSED. 

The order to procure plans and estimates for a 
new house for Hose Company Xo. 3, to be erected on 
city land on North Grove street, the cost of the 
house not to exceed §13,000, took its second reading 
and passed. 

Mr. Wadsworth presented a remonstrance signed 
by the presidents of several insurance companies 
and citizens who are large tax-payers, against the 
removal of Engine No. 4 from its present location, 
which was referred to the Commiitee on Fire Depart- 
ment on the part of this branch. 

Mr. Carney of Ward Two offered an order that 
the Committee on the Fire Department visit Hose 
House No. 8, and report what repairs are needed 
there. Referred to the Committee on the Fire Depart- 
ment on the part of the Council. 

Mr. Ryan presented the petitions of P. II. Berrell 
and others to be paid for damages for impaired 
drainage. Referred to the Committee on Claims, 
Mr. Van Nostrand of Ward Twelve, moved to recon- 
sider the vote whereby the motion to refer the subject 
of obtaining Franklin Hall for ward room was re- 
ferred to the Committee on Public Buildings. 

The President inquired if the mover voted in the 
affirmative when the vote was taken. He answered 
that he did not. 

Mr.Osborn moved that the Council adjourn. 

Mr. Flynu called for the yeas and nays, which were 
ordered. 

The Council voted to adjourn by a vote of 20 yeas 
to 13 nays. 



Proceedings of Board of Aldermen, 



SEPT. 21, 1868. 



The Board of Aldermen held their regular meeting 
at 4 o'clock, P. M., His Honor Mayor Shurtleff in the 
chair. 

Papers from the Common Council were severally 
acted upon in concurrence. 

PETITIONS PRESENTED AND REFERRED. 

Petition of A. D. Williams and others, that North- 
ampton and Hampden streets may be paved and 
sidewalks laid; of Moses B. Wildes, "that portions of 
Portland street may be repaved ; of Calvin Swallow, 
that the wall across West Chester park be removed; 
of Ezra Palmer and others, that Myrtle street from 
Hancock to Joy streets may be macadamized; of 
Patrick Travers" and others, that the name of Orchard 
place be changed ; of St. Mark's Church, that Ne wland 
street between Pembroke and Newton streets be 
graded, &c; of John Dove and others, that Quincy 
street may be graded and put in order; severally re- 
ferred to the Committee on paving. 



PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUlSrCTL. 



27 



Petition of Wra. Morse, for leave to place a flagstaff 
on Tremont street, corner Culvert street; of A. J. 
Atkinson A: Co. and others, that Wilson's lane be 
renumbered ; of James .1. Plynn and others, for leave 
to erect a flagstaff at 98 Broadway; severally re- 
ferred to the Committee on Paving, with full power. 

Petition of N. O. Hart and others, for a sewer in 
Wareham street; of Daniel Denny ami others, for a 
sewer in Broadway, between A and B streets; of 
Sherer & Beatty and others, for the extension of the 
Tremont street sewer to Cabot street; of Sherer & 
Beatty, for the discontinuance of the brook near the 
old Boxbnry line on Tremont street; of Sewall, Day 
,\i Co. and' others, that a sewer be laid in Buggies 
street, between the railroad and Parker street ; sev- 
erally referred to the Committee on sewers. 

Petition of John 1'. Townsend, that Rockland 
street lie accepted and graded ; of Thomas Gogin and 
others, for a street from Dorchester street to Roxbury 
territory; of Downer Kerosene Oil Co. and others, 
that Northampton street be extended through Swett 
street to South Boston; severally referred to the Com- 
mittee on Streets. 

Petition of E. G. Scott and others, for an additional 
lam)) in Washington place ; to Committee on Lamps. 

Petition of residents upon Rutland street and vicini- 
ty, for a Change in the system of drainage, whereby fur- 
ther injury to their property by the overflow of water 
may be prevented; referred to a special committee, 
Messrs. White, James and Paul. 

Petition of Bernard & Kane, to be paid for damages 
for injuries sustained On account of the widening of 
Tremont street; referred to the Committee ou Claims. 

INTENTIONS TO 151'ILD. 

The following notices of intentions to build were 
presented, and referred to the Committee on Streets: 

By II. V. Hitliuay, 155 and 157 Broadway; X.J. 
Bradlee, corner Tremont and West street; II. S. Cor- 
win, 30 Salutation street; S. s. Howe, corner Washing- 
ton and Madison streets; Joseph simomis, 89 Cam- 
bridge street, Thomas Keyes, Athens, near D street; 
Thomas Keves, Saratoga street; G. E. Shakley, Clapp, 
between Seventh and Eighth streets; A. F. Badger, 
Wareham street; David Snow, 5 and 7 Merchants' Row ; 
C. E. Jackson, 73 Kingston street ; Horace Jenkins, 
Warrefaton street; s. II. Pierce, Second, between E 
and F streets; Freborn F. Raymond, Cross, between 
Hanover and North streets ; Atkinson & Thayer, First , 
between K and L streets ; Judah Sears & Sons, Broad- 
way between G and H streets; Albert Brown, corner 
Oreen and Pitts streets. 

UNFINISHED BUSINESS. 

Resolve and order to extend Brimmer street from 
Mt. Vernon to Chestnut street at a cost of $26,000. 
Passed. 

Order to pay Alden S. Drake $2200 for Federal 
street damages. Passed. 

Order to pay Henry Carter and Mary Fay $700 for 
Tremont street damages. Passed. 

APPOINTMENTS. 

The following nominations submitted by His Honor 
the Mayor were confirmed by the Board. 

For Special Policeman, for duty at the Union Mis- 
sion, 847 Washington street, Charles P. Cousins. 

For Constables for the city of Boston (re-appoint 
inents) : 

Francis M. Adams, William C. Allen, Arthur F.An- 
derson, George M. Atwood, t Lionel Ayers, John R. 
Barry, *Phineas Bates, Morrill P. Berry, William W. 
Blake, Samuel Brackett, {Francis V. Bulfinch, {Asa 
O. Butman, Derastus Ciapp, Lemuel Clark, Joseph D. 
Coburn, *Chase Cole, William P. Cook, fDaniel B. 
Curtis, James Curtis, Elisha M. Davis, Albert G. 
Dawes, Albion P. Dearborn, David M. R. Dow, Alvin 
S. Drew, William E. Easterbrook, Caleb S. Emery, 
*Ueorge M. Feleh, {Richard J. Fennelly, {Thomas 
Polger, {Eben F. Gay, William T. Gibbons, Thomas 
Hall, John C. Harrington, Zacheus Holmes, Merrill S. 
Holway, {Alexander Hopkins, fSamuel N. Howe, 
John Huston, Frederic P. Ingalls, fPliny D. Ladd, 
John T. Lawton, William McCarthy, William I). Mar- 
tin, *Samuel Mcintosh, Charles J. Merrill, *Edward 
F. Mecuen, Jotham E. Munroe, William Muuroe, 
John B. Xeale, {Isaac F. Nelson, James O'Leary, 
David Patterson, Ephriam S. Phelps, {Joseph Pierce, 
{Augustus M. Rice, Edwin Rice, *Edward G. Rich- 
ardson, John W. Rose, Burnham Royce, Charles 
Smith, Thomas M. Smith, Asa Southworth, Oliver H. 
Spurr, Henry C. Stratton, Henry Taylor, George W. 
Tuckerman, *Charles E. Turner, Win. G. Tyler, Sam- 
uel S. Vialle, John C. Warren, Johnson" Warren, 



{James B. Weeks, William Whitwell, John Williams, 
Wright W. Williams. John Wilson, {Thomas P. Wil- 
son, {Isaac Worsley. 

* Truant Officers. 

f Health Department. 

{ Treasurer's Deputies. 

ORDERS OF NOTICE. 

The following orders of notice returnable this day 
were severally recommitted, no objections being pre- 
sented : 

On extension of Columbus avenue, eighty feet in 
Width, from Ferdinand to Church street. 

On the laying out of Appleton street, West Canton 
street, Dartmouth street, Tennyson street, Temple 
place. 

On the widening of Shawmut avenue and Washing- 
ton street, at the estate of Horace B. Sargent. 

MARGINAL FREIGHT RAILWAY. 

The order of notice returnable this day, upon the 
matter of laying out the Marginal Freight Railway, 
was considered. 

Messrs. Speare, Gregory & Co., doing business on 
Central wharf, remonstrated against the taking of the 
whole or a part of the block at the head of Central 
wharf, as being uncalled for and unnecessary. 

Mr. Bates, in behalf of the Railway Company, ex- 
plained that the petition of the Company applied only 
to the location in streets, affecting only what is taken 
within the streets, and not private property; that the 
law differed in relation to steam railways and street 
railways; that the law had been complied with so far 
as concerned private property, parties having their 
remedy elsewhere. 

Mr. J. H. French, representing property upon Tufts 
street, was present for the purpose of 'making the 
same objections, which the explanation had rendered 
unnecessary, but objected generally to the location of 
the railway in that street. 

Mr Harvey Jewell, in behalf of the Metropolitan 
Railway Company, though not objecting to the lo- 
cation," inasmuch' as that Company itself occupied 
the public streets, yet would ask "when the matter 
should come before "the Committee that their mutual 
rights should be protected. 

Mr.George Palmer, in behalf of the Middlesex 
Railway Company, desired to reserve the same rights 
before the Committee. 

Aldermen Talbot desired to know why the petition 
of the Company had been presented at this time. 

The charter had been granted two years since. 

There might be objection to granting the petition 
if the tracks were not laid down at an early day. 

Mr. Bates stated that he had understood that the 
subscriptions had been all completed and the re- 
quired certificate tiled, and all the arrangements 
made to commence work and lay down the road as 
soon as the petition was granted, it was only within 
three weeks that the company had understood that 
there was any necessity for "applying to the Board 
of Aldermen. That necessity was a matter of doubt. 
But, in order that there should be no (rouble in con- 
nection with the matter, the petition had been tiled. 

The order was recommitted. 

REPORTS OF COMMITTEES. 

Alderman Richards, from the Committee on Public 
Buildings, reported in favor of approving the lease 
to the Mechanics' Association of the hall now occu- 
pied by them, at $7000— an increase of $2500. Leases 
approved. 

Alderman Fairbanks, from the Committee on 
Sewers, reported leave to withdraw upon the petition 
for a sewer in Ball street, that street not having been 
accepted by the city. Also, no action necessary upon 
the petition for a sewer in Orange street. Reports 
accepted. 

Alderman Messinger, from the Committee on 
Health, reported in favor of granting the petition of 
Fearing & Renfrew for leave to erect a stable on 
Dove streets, between E and F streets. Report 
adopted. 

Also, no further action required upon the petition 
of Ignatius J. Sullivan against the same. Report 
accepted. 

Alderman White, from the Committee on Licenses, 
reported in favor of granting sundry licenses of vict- 
uallers, innholders, wagon licenses, &c. Also, in 
favor of revoking the wagon licenses of Gihnan & 
Mathews, McClanathan & Knowlton, and James 
McConnill. Reports accepted. 



28 



PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



0KDER8 ADOPTED. 

Order authorizing the purchase of .Mary Ann Bart- 
Lett's estate for 920,000. 

Order authorizing the purchase oi'M. C. Ferris's es- 
tate for $21,000. 

Order directing construction of sower inDunlow 
street. 

Order to pay the Boston Clay Retort and Fire Brick 
Manufacturing Co. $22,000 for land taken and damages 
occasioned bj the widening of Federal stre< t. 

order appropriating $500 for the dredging of the 
Hats in Charles river between Beacon and Charles 
streets ; said sum being in addition to the amount here- 
tofore authorized. 

order of notice to quit to Edwin Bowker, Charles 
Torrey and Franklin Torrey upon sixth street. 

Order of notice 1 l Michea'l 11. Gleeson and all other 
parties interested upon widening of Summer street on 
its northerly side at the corner of High Street, (Octo- 
ber .">.) 

Order of notice to the heirs of Amos Binney, Jesse 
P. Parker, Mrs. Annie W. Flint, wife of Geo. A. Flint, 
upon the extension of Ottawa street from Sherman to 
Warren streets. 

Order authorizing the Superintendent of Fire 
Alarms, under the direction of the Committee on Fire 
Alarms, to substitute Automatic Signal Boxes for 
those now in use at East Boston, at an expense not 
exceeding $700, said amount to be charged to the Ap- 
propriation for Fire Alarms. 

Order to abate the assessment upon Patrick Gon- 
agle for §30 91, and assess the same upon Patrick F. 
Sullivan. 

Order directing construction of a common sewer on 
Cabot street. 

Order to pay the heirs of Simeon K. Hewins $300 for 
damages occasioned by the widening of Tremont 
street. 

Order to pay Franklin Smith $10,000 for land taken 
and damages occasioned by the widening of Tremont 
street. 

Order to pay to Annie F. and Harriet Louisa Odin 
$16,000 for land taken and damages occasioned by the 
widening; of Tremont street. 

Order authorizing the Committee on Laying Out 
and Widening Streets, in the settlement of damages 
by the widening- of Tremont, to purchase the estate be- 
longing to Hannah M. Parsons (formerly belonging to 
William A. Wingate) for $17,000 the expense to be 
charged to the Tremont street loan. 

Order to pay the companies of volunteer militia cer- 
tified by the Adjutant-General on Sep. 17, 180*, as be- 
ing entitled to the bounty prescribed by law for spec- 
ial duty July 1."), 1868, the sums allowed for that pur- 
pose; viz: National Lancers, $37."> 50; Independent 
Corps of Cadets, $60 50; and that the same be charged 
to the appropriation for military bounty. 

Order abating tax of F. S. NewhallA Sons in 1867 
the sum of sis <i;, on personal property. 

Order of notice to Solon Dewey, corner of an estate 
on Kenilworth avenue, to furnish edgestones to sup- 
port sidewalk. 

Order of notice to owner of estate 3S Adams street, 
corner of Adams and Eustis streets, to remove stone 
wall upon said estate on the line of Eustis street. 

Order of notice to abutters and owners on Bar tie tt 
street to lay their sidewalks with brick. 

Order of notice to owners and abutters on Gouch 
street between Nos. 19 and 27 to lay their sidewalks 
with brick. 

Orderd, that the City Solicitor be requested to in- 
form this Board whether any committee of this Hoard 
or of the City Council have the right to sell any proper- 
ty belonging to the city, or contract for labor, without 
first being conferred upon them by this Board or the 
City Council. 

< irderth it the Committee on Public Institutions con- 
sider the expediency of purchasing land adjoining- 
Charter Street Primary School, and afford proper 
means of entrance and exit for scholars. 
Adjourned. 



Proceedings of Board of Aldermen, 



SEPT. 24, 180 8. 



The Hoard of Aldermen held a special meeting at 

one o'clock, P. M., His Honor Mayor Shuttles* in the 
chair. 

OKDER8 PASSED. 

Order that the Board adopt and establish the re- 
vised grade of Water street, between Washington 
and Congress streets and of Devonshire street, be- 
tween State and Milk streets, as bhown on plans and 
profiles drawn by the City Surveyor, dated Sept. 24, 
1868: 

Order, extending Columbus avenue eighty feet in 
width from Ferdinand to Church street, at an expense 
of $67,000. 

Adjourned. 



Proceedings of the Common Council, 



SEPT. 24, 1808. 



The regular weekly meetings of the Common Coun- 
cil were resumed this evening, by adjournment over 
the usual summer intermission, Ciias. H. Allen, Pres- 
ident, in the chair. 

Petitions from the Board of Aldermen were re- 
ferred in concurrence. 

ORDEltS PASSED IN COHCURKEWCE. 

Order for Committee on Public Instruction to eon- 
sider expediency of pur.. basing lands adjoining Char- 
ter street Primary Schoolhouse, to afford proper 
means of entrance and exit. 

Order for Committee on Ordinances to consi ler 
expediency of amending ordinance on engineering 
and surveying. 

Order to defray the expense of extra clerks in the 
City Clerk's office" to the amount of $800. 

Order to substitute 'automatic signal boxes" for 
those now in use at Fast Boston, at an amount not 
exceeding $700. 

The resolve and order for the extension of Brim- 
mer street from Mount Vernon to Chestnut street, 
and the resolve and order to lay out and extend Col- 
umbus avenue to Church street, wei'e severally read 
once. 

FEDERAL STREET BRIDGE. 

The orders for the widening of Federal Street 
Bridge, and for a loan of $19,000, to be appropriated 

therefore, were taken up, as unfinished business. 

Mr. Train of Ward Three inquired why there should 
be a widening- of the bridge, exclusive of the draw? 
If there was a necessity for a widening of the bridge, 
there should be also for the draw, and he could see 
no reason why the improvement should not be made 
at the same time, as the least expensive mode. He 
suggested that the report be referred to the Coin- 
mittee on streets for amendment. 

The Chair stated that it would be competent to refer 
the report to the Committee on street- on the part of 
the Council, but not with instructions. It might be re- 
ported back upon the expediency Of the measure, but 
the question would be upon concurring with the 
other branch. As the orders, however, contemplated 
appropriations of money, there were not enough mem- 
bers present for their passage, and it would be better 
to lay the subject on the table. 

Mr. Train moved to lay the orders on the table. 
Carried. 

REPORTS OF COMMITTEES. 

Mr. Stevens of Ward six, from the Committee on 
streets, on the resolve and orders to lay out and widen 
Shawmut street, reported that the same ought to pass. 
The report was accepted, and the orders were 
passed. 



PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



!9 



Mr. Stevens from the same committee, on the resolve 
and orders for the widening of Piedmont street, re- 
ported that the same ought to pass. Report accepted 
and orders passed. 

Mr. Stevens also reported on the resolve and orders 
for Hie laying OUt and widening of South Cedar street. 
that the same ought to pass. Report accepted, and 
Orders read once. 

Mr. Rice Of Ward Nine said he could sec no necessity 
for the widening of this street to 47 feet, as proposed, 
for it would never be an important street for public 
travel. Fayette street, 33 feet in width , was more of 
a thoroughfare than this and Shawnmt street w idened 
to -10 feel, would also lie more of a thoroughfare. The 
streets which intersect Columbus avenue would be 
much more travelled than South Cedar street, and 
he could see no necessity for a widening to more than 
35 feet. Large sums of money had been -pent for im- 
provement of streets, and where it was for the public 
benefit it should be done, hut this would he more for 
the benefit of private individuals, lie moved to a- 
mend by making the widening :!."> feet. 

The Chair stated that the motion would not be in 
order, the question being on concurrence or non-con- 
currence. 

Mr. Jenks of Three moved to recommit for the pur- 
pose of amendment, but on a further statement ot the 
••hair that no amendment could be made, the motion 
\\ as withdrawn. 

Mr. Stevens stated as the evidence before the Com- 
mittee that if there was to be any widening, the street 
should be widened to 47 feet. 

Mr. Hopkins of Ward Ten said he had been over 
the street many times, anil was surprised at the pro- 
posed widening to 47 feet. The other streets would 
be from 35tO40 feet, and he could see no necessity for 
this increased widening. If the order should lie non- 
concurred in, he believed it would please the mem- 
bers of the other Board. 

The Chair stated the question to be on the passage 
of the order, and the vote being taken it was lost. 

Mr. Stevens, from the same committee, on the re- 
solve and orders for the laying out and extending Avon 
place, mule a report with" reasons why the same 
should pass. 

On a motion to lav the resolve and orders on the 
table, 

Mr. Snow of Ward Eleven inquired whether it was 
not necessary to take some steps towards carrying 
out the proposed measure before the next meeting of 
the Council. 

Mr. Stevens replied that the bond for the purchase 
of the property of Jordan. Marsh & Co. for $85,000 
extended only to the 1th October, and that, something 
should be done at this meeting towards making the im- 
provement. 

The Chair stated thatitwould be competent to pass 
the order for taking the land, but for the want of a 
sufficient number of members, the order on the table 
for a loan to be appropriated for the extension, could 
not be passed. 

Mr.Stevens said that progress should be made in the 
matter to-night. 

The reading of the report was called for. In this 
fie Committee state that by the proposed improve- 
ment the value of property in the vicinity would be 
increased $1611,000, one-half of which, $80,000, could 
be assessed for betterment. Most of the owners of 
property had petitioned for the extension, the only ac- 
ception being the proprietors of the Second Church, 
and this in view of the fact that the expense would 
be born by the abutters. The extension was call- 
ed for to relieve the crowded condition of Washington 
street, and by the improvements in the neighborhood 
in the building of commodious warehouses and stores. 

The report was accepted, and the order for taking 
the land for the extension was passed. 

On motion of Mr. Stevens, subsequently, the order 
lor a loan of $115,000, to be appropriated for laying 
out and extending Avon place, was. taken from. the 
table and assigned to Thursday evening next, N 1 ., 
o'clock. The report was also ordered to be printed. 

The same committee reported that the order for the 
construction of a drawbridge over Roxbury Canal at 
Albany street, and to transfer from the Reserved Fund 
not exceeding $8000 therefor, ought to pass. 

The report was accepted, anil the order was read 
once and laid on the table. 

ORDERS ADOPTED. 

On motion of Mr. Gray of Ward Twelve, that the 
Treasurer be allowed to pay from that portion of the 
receipts of taxes on sales of' liquors authorized to be 
retained by the city, a sum not exceeding $-2500 for 



clerk hire. 

On motion of Mr. Gray, that the Treasurer be al- 
lowed for extra clerk hire, and for the payment of the 
Roxbury Collector for the collection of taxes assessed 
previous to the annexation of Roxbury to Boston, a 
sum not exceeding $3000. 

On motion of Mr. Train of Ward Three, that each 
member of the City Council lie furnished by the Mes- 
senger with a copy of the new map of the city, proper- 
ly mounted, the expense thereof to be charged to the 
appropriation for incidental expenses. 

Mr. Bishop, of Ward Seven offered the following 
order : 

Ordered that it would be for the interest of the City 
of Boston to have the pay of the police force increased.. 

Mr. Bishop, in support of the order, said that the 
police force were the most poorly paid of any officers 
in the employment of the city. The pay should be 
such as would command the services of first class 
men, when in fact it was not more than could be com- 
manded by common laborers. Good mechanics could 
command much more pay. It was necessary to have 
respectable men and that the should live respectably. 

The order was referred to the committee on police, 
on the part of the Council. 

On motion of Mr. Knight of Ward Fight, it was or- 
dered, that when the Council adjourned, it be to 7'. 
o'clock, on Thursday evening next, and that that be 
the hour of meeting until otherwise ordered. 

Adjourned to Thursday evening next, iy z o'clock. 



Proceedings of Board of Aldermen, 

SEPT. 28, 1868. 



The Board of Aldermen held their regular meeting 
at the usual hour, Mayor Shurtleffin the chair. 

Papers from the Common Council were disposed of 
in concurrence, with the exception of the order pro- 
viding copies of the new city map to the members of 
the Common Council, which was so amended as to 
include the members of the Board. 

PETITIONS PRESENTED AND REFERRED. 

Petition of Samuel A. Way that the gutters may lie 
paved and edge-stones set iii Genesee street ; of F. T. 
Marliaveand others that Chelsea street, between the 
Atlantic Works and Junction street, be graded and 
put in order : of Henry W. Wilson and others that 
the name of Sulivan street be changed to Ninth strei t ; 
John M. Clark and others that the whole of Court, 
square be paved with wooden pavement; of A. 1). 
Hodges and others that a sidewalk be laid on St. James 
street and Shawnmt avenue; of D. W. Salisbury and 
others that crossing stones be placed in Berkeley and 
Marlborough streets; of Iienj. F. Brooks and others 
for cross walks on Washington street, opposite 298. 
Severally referred to the Committee on Paving. 

Petition of David II. Blandly and others for a sewer 
in London street, between Meridan and Decatur 
streets' ; of Robert I J. Williams and others' for improved 
plan of drainage in Upton street. Referred to Com- 
mittee on Sewers. 

Petition of Cath. Ray and others that a nuisance 
proceeding from the Purchase street sewer may be 
abated. Referred to Committee on Health. 

Petition of Li D.Davenport for Leave to purchase a 
portion of the old Burying- Ground on Eustis street. 
Referred to Committee 'on Cemeteries. 

Petition of Augustine Sanderson and others for use 
of Faneuil Hall on September;}!) for a Soldiers' Con- 
vention; of the Ancient and Honorable Artillery Co 
for leave to use the upper hall of Faneuil Hall I'm 
drill exercises : of Henry Morgan and others for tisi 
of Faneuil Hall, October 14. for a political meeting 
Severally referred to the Committee on Faneuil Hall. 

Petition of Bowker, Torrey & Co., that the assess 
meat of betterment on their estate on Adams street In 
apportioned in three parts; of T. 10. Craibe and other: 
for the extension of F. street. South Boston; oft has 
Miller and others that Woodward street be accepted 
Severaly referred to the Committee on Streets. 



30 



VR.OCKKDrNGrS OF (TTV COUNCIL. 



IN I I.N I ln\s TO BUILD. 

The following notices of intentions to build were 
r 'ferred to the Committee on Streets : 

OfA. J. Bradlee, corner Tremont and Elliol streets; 
George E. Davis, corner Lexington and Prcacotl 
Streets; U. S. Jones, Regent, near Alpine street; 
James < >. Neil, < Jove, lift ween Beach aid East streets ; 
True Russell, Zeigler street, near Dearborn; Anthony 
Dow nie, Shawmul avenue, between Rugglea and Ver- 
non streets; William II. Warren, Third, between C 
and I) streets ; Franklin Proctor, Hampden, near Eus- 
is street; Jeremiah Bucland, Meridian, between Cen- 
tral square ami London street; First Presbyterian 
Congregation, Berkeley, between Lawrence and 
Chandler streets; John Shaughnessy, Seventh, be- 
tween F ami I) streets; G. W. Meserve, 9 Hai'rison 

avenue; 10. (i. Cailldwell, '-!7 Centre Street; L. M. 

Burgess, :!7 (Essex street; Hugh Cain. Marion, be- 
tween Paris and Havre streets; Franklin & Clarke, 
Broadway, south Boston; Fran/. Duard, Tremont, 
between Northfleld ami Camden streets. 

KIXH.V ES PASSED. 

Resolve taking certain parcels of land for the pur- 
pose of 'Widening High street, at an estimated COSl of 
$70,000. 

Resolve taking certain parcels of laud for the pur- 
pose of widening Kno\ street, at an estimated ex- 
pense of $200. 

APPOINTMENTS. 

The following appointments, summitted by the 
Mayor, were confirmed by the Board. 

Constable: — Abraham M. Leavitt, Joshua B. Stack- 
pole, .John I!. O'Brien. 



Weigher of Coal— George V. Emery. 
Sergeant of Police— Sarnuel W. How< 



OKDEB OF NOTICE RECEIVED. 

An order ot notice was received from the Supreme 
Judicial (Hurl concerning the Custody of the Charles 
Kher and Warren Bridges, to appearand show cause 
why three commissioners should not be appointed in 
accordance with, the provisions of an apt <>t the Gen- 
eral Court for the purpose of determining and award 
ing what counties, cities- or towns receive particular 
and special benefit from the maintenance of the said 
bridges. Referred to the Commissioner on Bridges 
and City Solicitor, with instructions to represent the 
Board in the premises. 

OBDEKS OF NOTICE. 

The following orders of notice, returnable this day. 
were severally recommitted: 

Order of notice upon the widening of Berlin street 
(without objection). 

Order of notice upon the widening of Knox street 

(w ilhout objection). 

Order of notice upon the widening of Cedar street 
and Highland street. Mr. Charles Bunker objected 
to the proposed widening, and desired that the con- 
sideration of the subject be postponed. Recommitted, 

on motion of Alderman Cobb, to the Committee on 
Sewers, with instructions to hear the parties. 

REPORTS HI' COMMITTEES. 

Alderman Talbot, from the Committee on Laying 
Out and Widening Streets, in response to orders of 
May 9, and June 2, reported the expense (by appro. 
priate estimate) of widening Hanover street to sixty 

feet from Court to Commercial street, as follows. 
From Court to Elm street. $220,571, Elm to Friend, 
$152,497, Friend to Blaokstone, $130,551, Black-tone to 
Richmond, $227,659, Richmond to Clark. $184,028, 
Clark to Commercial, $106,150, making a total of 
$1,021,456. 

Alderman Pratt moved that the report be recom- 
mitted with instructions to report an order of notice 
to the abutters that tin- Board intends to lay out and 
widen Hanover si reel between Court and Richmond 
streets, to a width of about sixty feet. The motion 
was laid upon the table upon motion of Alderman 
BtEessinger. 

Alderman Talbot, from the Committee on Laying 
Out and Widening Streets, in accordance with an or- 
der of June 29, reported the expense of extending 
Broadway to Albany street, sixty feet in width, as 
follows, \ \/.. : Low grade, including pile bridge across 
Fori Point ( hannel. $350,000; at high grade, including 
all necessary structures and iron bridges, $550,000. 

Alderman James moved to recommit the report, 
with instructions to report order ot notice for high 
grade. The motion was laid upon the table, on motion 
of Alderman Pratt. 



Alderman Paul, from the Committee on Sewers, 
submitted a report asking an additional appropriation 
b\ the ( ity Council of twenty Ave thousand dollars 

$25,000) io delra> the post of w ork either now in prog- 
ress or for which orders have been parsed bj the 
Board of Aldermen. The committee saj thai the ra- 
pidity witii which Cochituate water ha- been intro- 
duced into the Highland District, and the consequent 
demand for sewerage in thai section, ha- caused the 
expenditure of the larger part of the appropriation; 
but as three-fourths of this expense w ill be repaid by 
assessments, the actual income of the department \\ ill 
largely exceed the estimate. 

The details which have governed the committee in 
fixing the amount desired are as follow S, \ i/.. : 

Already expended $48,863 71 

For sewers now in progress 7.01 en 

ordered by Board of Aldermen.. 18,000 00 
Ordinary expenses ofDept. to i-t May, t,;i.. 5,000 no 



Appropriation ofMaj ,'68. 



:;.-e.; 7 I 
50,00000 



I tendency $23,863 7 1 

Report referred to the Committee on Finance. 

Alderman James, from the Committee on Paving, 
submit ted a report asking an additional appropriation 
for the expenses of the Paving Department of one 
hundred thousand dollars. The Committee state that 
the amount appropriated for the Department at the 
commencement of the year was $300,000, and that of 
this sum $242,267 .'!■.' ha.-' been expended. Report re- 
ferred to the < onunii tee on Finance. 

Alderman James, from the Committee on Paving, 
reported leave to withdraw on the petition of Hiram 
DeLuce to be compensated for damages incurred by 
changing the grade oi Second street. Report accepted.. 

Also leave to withdraw on the petition OfD. Cham- 
berlain for leave to build a bulkhead and cellar door 
way in the sidewalk at 71 Canal street. Report ac- 
cepted. 

Alderman White, from the Committee on Licenses, 
reported in favor of granting the petition of John Shi a 
for leave to give a sparring exhibition at Wait's Hall. 
Report accepted. 

Also in favor of the petition of I;. Sullivan for leave 
to give a sparring exhibition at Wait's Hall. Report 
accepted. 

Also in favor of revoking the license of James Lynch, 
bootblack. Report accepted. 

Also in favor of granting sundry wagon licenses. 
Report accepted. 

Alderman Talbot, from the Committee on Street -. 
recommended the reference to the Committee on 
Paving of the petition of J. J. Mu*\roe and other-, and 
the petition of James Sturgis and others, that Walnut 
avenue be widened on the Haskins Estate. Reporl 
accepted and petition referred. 

Also no action necessary upon the notices of inten- 
tion to build ], resented at the last meeting. Report 
accepted. 

Alderman Messiuger, from the ( onimitteeon Health. 
reported an order to abate sundry nuisances. Order 

adopted. 

Alderman Cobb, from the Committee on Claims, 
reported leave to withdraw on the petition of Anna 
Harrod for compensation for personal injuries. Re 
port accepted. 

Also leave to withdraw on petition of Neal Kenney 
for compensation for personal injuries. Report ac- 
cepted. 

Alderman Paul, from the Committee on sewers, re- 
ported leave to withdraw on the petition of Sherer & 
Beatty for the discontinuance of the brook near the 
old Roxburv line on Tremont street, as the city have 
no power to grant the same. Report accepted. 

Alderman White, from the Committee on Public In- 
struction, reported inexpedient to grant the request of 
the School Committee for certain alterations in the 
Bowdoin street sehooihouse. Report accepted. 

SUFFOLK STREET GB IDES. 
Alderman Messinger, from the joint special com- 
mittee appointed to consider w hat action i< necessary 
under the act lor the improvement of the territory 
adjacent to Dover street, submitted a lengthy report, 

and recommended the passage of the following order. 

Ordered that the city surveyor, under the direction 
of the joint special committee on the Suffolk street 
district, so called, be authorized to make surveys, es- 
timates and descriptions of the territory described in 
chapter 277 of the acts of the year 1868; and that the 
said committee be authorized to employ competent 
persons to examine the titles ofsuth portions of the 



PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



31 



property within the said district as they shall deem 
accessary, at an expense not exceeding $4,000, — said 
sum to be transferred for that purpose from the 
reserved fund. 

The report gives the following statements concern- 
tag this area. 

The territory described in chap. 277, acts 1868, cov- 
ers an area of about thirty-one acres. The assessors' 
valuation of the real estate for the present year (ex- 
cluding Dover street where the houses have been 
raised) amounts to $3,414,000. 

Number of dwelling houses 680 

•• buildings of all kinds 749 

(Brick, 509; wood, 236; stone, 4,) 

Number of families 1288 

•■ persons 5730 

" buildings occupied by owners 156 

Number of buildings occupied by owners and 

tenants '. 1 93 

Number of buildings occupied bj tenants 474 

Amount paid bj City to owners of estates (including 
Dover street ) for damages from defective drainage 
)jill."),147 15. 

ORDERS PASSED. 

Order chat the Committee on Public Buildings be 
authorized to lii up and furnish the basement of 
the Unitarian Cnurch on the corner of Fourth and 
Emerson streets, south Bostou, for accommodation 
pi a Primary school, the expense therefor to be 
charged to the appropriation for Primary Schools. 

Order apportioning into three equal parts, each 
io he added to the annual taxes, the assessments 
made September 14, 1868, upon the estates of Edwin 
Bowker, Charles Torrey and Franklin Torrey, cor- 
ner of Chardon street. 

Order that the Committee on Public Buildings be 
requested to furnish such accommodations for evening 
schools as the school Committee may require, the 
expense thereof to be charged to Primary Scliools, 
Public Buildings. 

Order that the license to keep an intelligence 
office at 150 Hanover street, heretofore granted to 
Prank Williams, be revoked for cause. 

Order to pay hens of Jonathan Patten (J. M. 
Keith, trustee,) sIT.—l for land taken and dam- 
ages occasioned by the widening of Tremont 

street. 

Order of notice to the proprietors of the Second 
Church. George Gardner, Eben D. Jordan, and 
Chas. Marsh, Elizabeth A. Cushing, to remove 
buildings or obstructions on Avon Place, to allow 
of widening the same. 

Order directing the Chief of Police to notify owners 
and abutters on Biimmer street to furnish edge- 
stones to support the sidewalk, and to lay their 
sidewalks with brick. 

Order that the Superintendent of Public Buildings 
be authorized to furnish suitable bookcases for the 
Law Library of the Municipal Court, Southern Dis- 
trict, at an exp suse not exceeding $ !00, to be charged 
to the appropriation for the County of Suffolk. 

Order, that the Armory occupied by Co. I). 1st Reg. 
.Mass. Vol. Militia, over the car house in Eliot Square, 
beapprovedas a suitable (dace for the deposit of 
arms, at an annual rent not to exceed $300. 

Order of Notice (Oct. 12) upon the widening ot' 
Green street on its northeasterly side, between Pitts 
street and Cresent place. 

Order that the Superintendent ol streets be directed 
to take down the brick wail on the westerly side of 
West Chester Park. 

Order to pay certain biils of members of the City 
Council for services rendered or materials furnished. 

Orders, se\ erallj . to pay Daniel Clark $4."d, Stephen 
O.Douuel $263, John Johnson $512, Edward 1*'. Litch- 
field $790, in full compensation for damages by the 
raising of the grade of Shawmut avenue. 

Order that the Armory occupied by Co. A, 1-t Reg. 
M. V. M., im Chester Hall, on Washington street, lie 
approved as a suitable place for the deposit of arms, 
at an annual rent not to exceed s:!U0. 

Order directing the Chief-Of-Police to notify the 
owners and abutters on New land street between Pem- 
broke and Newton streets, to furnish new edge-stones 
to support the sidewalk, and to lay their sidewalks 
with brick. 

Order directing Chief-of-PoliCe to notify the owners 
and abutters on Buggies street, between Washington 
and Auburn streets, to furnish edgestones to support 
the sidewalk, and to lay their sidewalks with brick. 

Order authorizing the Superintendent of Sewers to 
repair the sewer in Havre street, between .Meridian 
and Porter streets. 



Order to pay the heir-, of Khenc zer Francis, owners 

Royal Bosworth and E. S. Hamlin, lessees, $1500 for 

damages to "buildings 256 Federal street, occasioned 

b; i no w idening of said street. 

Order tied toe Armory to he occupied, by Co. B, 9th 

Infantry, at 25 Eliot street, be approved as a suitable 
place for the deposit of arms, &c, at an annual rent 
of $300, said sum to be charged to the appropriation 
lor armories. 

VOTING LISTS. 

Order that due notice be given thai the voting lists 

of the several ward- are now completed and that cop 
ies of the same may he inspected at the < ity Hall, and 
at or near the Ward Room in each ward, and that 
all legal voters of this city he requested to see if 
their names are correctly inserted thereon, and the 
following described persons tire particularly called 
upon to see if thay are duly registered, viz : — Natura- 
lized citizens who have not been registered in the City 
Clerk's Office; persons who have received no tax 
bills for 1868; persons taxed without their given 
names ; and persons who have reached their majority 
since .May 1. 1868. The Board of Aldermen will attend 
attheir room in City Hall each day until the 2d dt 
November next and inclusive, for the purpose of cor- 
recting -aid lists. Persons who wish to have their 
names ineertedor corrected must exhibita paid tax 
bill for 1SC7 or 1868, and no person will have a right to 
vote who has not paid a tax assessed upon him within 
two years according to law. 

Ordered, that the City Clerk he authorized to make 
proper arrangements for the additional accommodation 
of the voters in Wards One, Seven, Twelve, Thirteen, 
Fourteen, Fifteen, so that evening sessions for the 
registration of voters of said wards may be had re- 
spectively at East Boston, South Boston, and the 
Highlands, such sessions to he attended by some 
member of this Board and by the city Clerk or his 
assistant; and that public notice thereof be issued 
accordingly. 

MARGINAL FREIGHT RAILWAT. 

Order giving permission to the Marginal Freight 
Railway Company to lay down tracks in the following 
named streets of the city of Boston, viz.: Lincoln. 
Tufts, Last. Cove. Beach, Federal, Broad, India, and 
the street east of the Custom House. Commercial 
Causeway, Andover, Minot and Lowell, as authorized 
by chapter 170 of the Acts of the Legislature of Mas- 
sachusetts, 1867. The whole work of constructing 
said tracks and the position of I hi' -a me in the streets 
shall be under the direction of the Committee on 
Paving and the Superintendent of Streets, and -hall 
lie approved bj them. 

METROPOLITAN RAILRO ID. 

Order that, in addition to the right heretofore grant- 
ed to the Metropolitan Railroad Corporation by the 
city of Boston, to lay down tracks in several streets 
of sairt city, said company shall have the right to a 
single track in the centre of Shawmut avenue, between 
Dale and Townsend streets, with a suitable turnout 
on -aid avenue near Townsend street. 

Also connecting with the above a single track on 
the westerly side of . shawmut avenue, between Town- 
send street and the dividing line between the city of 
Boston and the town of We-t Roxbury. 

The right, to the above tracks is upon the condition 
that the manner of constructing the tracks, the pre- 
cise location of the same, and the form of rail used, 
shall be satisfactory to the Committee on Pa\ tag and 

the Superintendent of streets, and shall be approved 
by them. 

'Also upon the condition that whenever the Board 
of Aldermen shall so direct, the space between the 

rails of said tracks and three feet outside thereof, 
shall be paved with such kind ami quality of pa\ ing 
as the Superintendent of street- -had direct. 

Also upon the condition that the Metropolitan Kail- 
roan Corporation accept this location within twenty 
days of the dale of its pas-age, and agree in writing 
to comply with its several conditions, otherwise it 
shall be null and void. 

Adjourned. 



32 



PROCEEDING-S OF CITY COUNCIL. 



Proceedings of the Common Council, 

OCT. 1. 1868. 



The Common Conned] met at 7| o'clock, P. M., the 
President in the chair, forty-six members being 
present 

PETITION'S. 

Petition of George C. Sbepard that certain taxes er- 
roneously paid lis- refunded; referred to the Commit- 
tee on Assessors' Department. 

Petition of the trustees of the Massachusetts infant 
Asylum for the temporary use of the former almshouse 
at Boston Highlands; referred to Committee on Pub- 
lic Buildings. 

PAPEBS FROM THE BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 

The petitions from the Board of Aldermen were sev- 
erally referred in concurrence. 

The report) leave to withdraw, on petition of Neal 
Kenny to be paid for injuries to his horse caused by an 
engine, was accepted in concurrence. Also, the re- 
port, leave to withdraw, on the petition of Annie M. 
Ilarrod. to be paid tor personal injuries. 

The order to pay sundry bills connected directly or 
indirectly with the members of the City Council, (Oc- 
tober draft) was passed in concurrence. 

The amendment to the order providing maps of the 
City of Boston for members of the City Council, was 
idopted in concurrence. 

The report and order in favor of providing for even- 
ng schools was laid over. 

Report ami order providing for fitting up and fur- 
nishing the basement of the church on the corner of 
Fourth and Emerson streets for a Primary school. 
Report accepted and ordered passed, in conncurivnce. 

Resolve and order for the widening of High street. 
Referred to the Committee on Streets on the part Of 
the Common Council. 

Report of Committee on Sewers, asking for an ad- 
ditional appropriation of $25,000 for the Sewer Depart- 
ment. Referred to the Committee on Finance in con- 
currence. 

Report of Committee on Paving, asking for an ad- 
ditional appropriation of $100,000 for the Paving De- 
partment. Referred to the Committee on Streets on 
the part of the Common Council. 

UNFINISHED BUSINESS. 

Resolve and order for the extension of Brimmer 
street. Referred to the Committee on Streets on the 
pari of the Common Council. 

Resolve and order for the extension of Columbus 
avenue. Referred to the Committee on Streets on the 
part of the Common Council. 

ORDINANCES PASSED. 

The following ordinances, reported from the Com- 
mittee on Ordinances were severally adopted: 
An Ordinance to amend an Ordinance relating to the 
Public Health. 

Section 1. The forty-sixth section of the ordinance 
relating to the public health, passed .May twenty-first 
in the year eighteen hundred and sixty-three, is here- 
by amended by inserting alter the word "no" iu the 
first line, the word cesspool." 

An Ordinance to amend an Ordinance relating to the 
Public Health. 

Section 1. The fifty-ninth section of tie ordinance 
relating to the public health, passed May twenty-first 
in the year eighteen hundred and sixty-three, is here- 
by amended by inserting after the word "no" in the 
first line, the word "fowls." 

REPORTS OF COMMITTEES. 

Mr. Train of Ward Three, from the Committee on 
Ordinances to whom was referred an order request- 
ing the Mayor to petition the next legislature for 
an act to prevent the erection in this city of any pub- 
lie or private stable without the consent of the Board 
of Health, reported the same in a new draft. Report 
accepted and order passed. 

Mr. Bean, from the Committee on Public Buildings, 
presented a report recommending the transfer of the 
inmates of tin' Discharged Soldiers' Borne to the old 
almshouse in Boston Highlands, which on motion of 
Mr. Wadsworth was recommitted. 

Mr. Bean of Ward Eleven, from the joint standing 
Committee on Public Buildings, to whom was referred 



the order relating to hiring Franklin Hall for a ward 

room for Ward Seven, reported in favor .if hiring Un- 
said ball, to be used only for voting purposes and pri- 
mary meetings for ward nominations. The report was 

accepted. 

Mr. Driscoll of Ward Five opposed the adoption of 
the order, on the ground that no better accommoda- 
tions were furnished in Franklin Hall than in the pres- 
ent wardroom, and intimated that I he proposal for a 
change was based on political grounds. 

Mr. Bean explained the recommendation ofthe com- 
mittee. 

Mr. Wright of Ward Twelve read from the journal 
ofthe former proceedings ofthe Council, to show 
that this sbuject of proper ward-rooms bad been be- 
fore considered at his suggestion, and that the Com. 
mittee on Public Buildings had reported the present 
ward-rooms in good condition, and suitable for the 
purposes for whicn they were employed. He did not 
desire to oppose the request of Ward' seven for a new 
ward-room, if such were realy required, hut there was 
no reason why this ward should he belter treated than 
the other wards. The whole population of South 
Boston was once accommodated by the ward-room 
now used by Ward Seven. 

The order was rejected. 

Subsequently Mr. Jacobs of Ward Five moved that 
the vote rejecting the order he reconsidered. 

Mr. Bishop of Ward Seven favored the adoption of 
the order, as not only furnishing more desirable ac- 
commodations, hut being a matter of economy. 

Mr. Tram was opposed to the adoption of the order, 
unless a similar change should be made general in all 
the wards. 

The motion to reconsider was lost by a vote of 17 to 
26. 

ORDER PRESENTED. 

Mr. Rockwell of Ward Ten offered an order author- 
izing the Committee on Fire Alarms to visit West Troy 
for the purpose of purchasing fire alarm bells for the 
Roxbury district; the expense of the same not to ex- 
ceed $500. 

Mr. Wadsworth of Ward Four raised a point of or- 
der that such an order had been presented during the 
present year, and postponed indefinitely. 

The point of order was sustained, and the order ne- 
gatived by the ruling ofthe chair. 

ORDERS ADOPTED. 

Order that the Committee on Public Buildings he re- 
quested to consider the expediency of erecting' a bouse 
tor the accommodation ofthe Harbor Police Boat, at. 
an expense not exceeding $1500. 

Order that the expenses of procuring and erecting 
drinking hydrants by the Cocbituate Water Board, as 
ordered by the vote ofthe City Council Sept. 17th. ISiis. 
be charged to incidental expenses and miscellaneous 
claims, the sum not to exceed $4000. 

Order that the Committee on Public Buildings be au- 
thorized to make such alterations as are needed iu the 
building occupied by the Steam Engine Co. No. 1. at 
an expense not exceeding five thousand dollars, said 
sum to be transferred for that purpose from the re- 
served fund. 

Order that the Committee on Public Buildings be re- 
quested to purchase a lot of land on North square, or 
in the immediate vicinity, and erect thereon a suitable 
building for Steam Engine Co. No. s", the expense 
thereof not to exceed $20,000. Also an order author- 
izing the treasurer to borrow the said sum. 

Order that the Committee on Fire Department, on 
the part ofthe Common Council, consider and report 
whether the ordinances regulating the inspection and 
Storing Of petroleum are properly enforced, and wheth- 
er any additional legislation is necessary concerning 
the same. 

Order that the Committee of Public Buildings be 
authorized to purchase a strip of land on River street, 
containing 308 square feet, for a sum not exceeding 
$800. 

Order tnat the Committee on Public Buildings con- 
sider and report upon the expediency of providing a 
new hosehouse for Hose Co. Xo. 7, and report the 
probable cost ofthe same. 

AVON" PLACE EXTENSION". 

The order concerning a loan of $115,000, to be ap- 
propriated for laying out and extending Avon place 
from Washington street to Chauncy street and for the 
purchase of certain estates upon the line ofthe same, 
was taken up on motion of Mr. Train of Ward Three, 
being the special assigment for S 1 .. o'clock, and passed 
by a vote of 42 to i. 



PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



33 



DRAW-BRIDGE OVER ROXBURY CAN.U.. 

On motion of Mr. Keith of Ward Fifteen the order 
was taken from the table and passed providing for 
the erection of a draw-bridge over Roxbury Canal at 
Albany street, and a transfer of not exceeding $8000 
from the reserved fund therefor. 

Adjourned. 



Proceedings of Board of Aldermen, 



OCT. 3, 1868. 



The Board of Aldermen held a special meeting at 
IB o'clock, Mayor Shurtleff in the c£air, for the pur- 
pose of considering an order relating to the taking of 
property in Avon place. 

PETITION'S PRESENTED AND REFERRED 

Petition of Louis Prang (br the removal of the Met- 
ropolitan Railroad track on Washington street near 
Gardner street ; referred to Committee on paving. 

Petition of Horace McMnrtrie and others that Gard- 
ner street be accepted and put in order; referred to 
< !o nmitlee on Street i. 

Petition of Robert .Moore for leave t > erect a stable 
for more than four horses at 64 Endicott street; re- 
ferred t i fie (' immitt se on |[ jalth. 

Petition of James W. Dudley ami others for a gas 
lamp i.i Stoddard street; referred to the Committee 
on Lamps. 

INTENTIONS TO BUILD, 

The following notices of intentions to build were 
presented and referred to the Committee on Streets. 
Henry Baloy, Maverick street, uearCottage street: 
Mrs. B. Maioney, Junction of Saratoga and Chelsea 
streets ; David Towns :nd, 206 Tremont street, Lemuel 
Clark, 53 TeleTraph street ; Ira !!. Qllimby, "it Cooper 
street; John He wit, IS Hampshire street: Alexander 
Johnson, Clifford street (Roxbury); David Davies & 
Son, Mt. Vernon street west of Charlesstreet; Wni.R. 
Summers & Company, Albany, between .Maiden and 
Wareham streets; A. Folsom & Sons. Longwood av- 
enue; Albert Brown, westerly side of Staniford street; 
D. W. Beckler, sixth ami Seventh strei ts, '-et.veen K 
and L streets; 10. C. Gorden, Bennington, between 
Putnam and Prescott streets; James Manahan, 1321 
Tremont street; A. E. Giles, Alpine street, opposite 
Akron street; C. K. Kirby, corner of Tremont ami 
Eliot streets; George Mulloy, Sullivan street; 1''. L, 
Sargent, Bennington, between Loudon and Prescott 
sir. 'els; Robert Wright, London, between Decatur 
and Meridian street -. 

REPORT <)1 - COMMITTEE. 
Aldermen White, from the committee on Licenses, 
reported in favor of granting sundry victuallers' li- 
censes. 

OlinEH PASSED. 

Order that the settlement of damages occasioned by 
the ext insion of Avon place to Chauney street, by a 
resolve passed Sept.25, 1868, there be pail to Eben D. 
Jordan and Charles Marsh the sum of $35,030for their 
estite containing 4797 square feet of land by survey 
of the City Surveyor, with interest at six per cent. 
from .Inly r, to Get iber 3, istts, amounting to $1232 56. 

Alderman Talbot, in presenting the order, stated 
that in fie laying out of the street, before any pre- 
liminary work had been done, the committee required 
of the abutters on Avon place that they should get a 
bo, id of tie owners of the Congregational building es- 
tate to sell the same to tin; City at a price which would 
be satisfactory t;> the petitioners, who ultimately 
would have to pay for the est ite in betterments. That 
bond expires Oct. '4. The petitioners tried unavailingly 
to have it renewed, unless at an advance. Under the 
circumstances the Board was now called upon to pass 
l i • order present id, if it should see lit, in ord ir to se- 
cure this property. There was a little over 2000 feet 
remaining after the widening as proposed, which 
would be for the city to sell. Under the circumstances 
be asked that the order take its second reading at 
the present time. 

'fhe order was read a second time and passed. 

Adjourned. 



Proceedings of Board of Aldermen 



OCT. o, 1868. 



The Board of Aldermen held their regular meeting 
at 4 o'clock, 1'. M., Mayor Shurtleffin the chair. 

Papers from the Common Council ware severally 
disposed of in concurrence, with the exception of the 
report in favor of transferring discharged soldiers to 
the Roxbury Almshouse, in (be recommittal of which 
the Board non-concurred, and an order was passed as 
a substitute for the original. [See orders.] 

PETITIONS PRESENTED. 

Petition of Charles W. Slack and others for use of 
Faneuil Hall Nov. 3, in the evening; of Win. Cumston 
and others far use of Faneuil Hall Oct. 15, lor a polit- 
ical meeting; of Albert J. Wright and others for use 
of faneuil Hail Oct. 7; of Charles W. slack and 
others, for the use- of Faneuil Hall Oct. 13 for a polit- 
ical on eting ; sei erally referred to Committee on Fan- 
euil Hall, with lull powers. 

Petition of Calvin G. Page and others for abate- 
ment of a nuisance at 43 Spring street; of Jacobs A 
Deane for leave to erect a stable tor more than four 
horses on Worcester street, near Columbus avenue; 
severally referred to ( 'ommittee. on Health. 

Petition of Charles W. Baxter and others for cross- 
walks on Beach Street at Oxford street: Of J. E. Hart -- 
horn and others that Day street may be put in order; 
of iHaberstroh & Needham for the grade of Rochesl r 
street; of Geo. II. Pike, that Dennis street be graded, 
&c; of John Dupee, that the passageway between 
Dedham and Plympton streets may Degraded; sev- 
erally referred to Committee on Paving, with lull 
powers. 

I! 'monstrance of (diaries Bunker and other- against 
the construction of the Cedar street sewer; petition of 
Martin Beatty and another for a sewer in Weston 
street, west of Tremont street; referred to the Com- 
mittee on Sewers. 

Petition of Foster Waterman and others for the 
widening of Bedford street; referred to the Commit- 
tee on Streets. 

Petition of Barney Hull for revocation of a license 
for the hack stand in front of the Hancock House; re- 
ferred to the Committee on Licenses. 

Petition of .1. F. Dearborn and others for the im- 
provement of Middlesex street; referred to the Com- 
mittee on the Suffolk Strei t grades. 

Remonstrance of Joseph R sed and others against 
the proposed widening of Berlin street on the moth 
side; Monday Oct. 12, 4 \£ P. M. assigned for a hearing. 

Petition of the East Boston Ferry Company for an 
increase of fare to such an extent as will enable the 
Company t > earn ai.d divide a yearly dividend of 
eight per cent, on their invested capital; laid on the 
taole and ordered to be printed. 

INTENTIONS TO BUILD. 

The following notices of intentions to build were 
presented and severally referred to the (.'ommittee on 
Streets: Of Jacobs & Ueane, Worcester, between Co- 
lumbus avenue and Tremont street; Naylor & Co., 
Federal, near Seventh street, (two Locations.) 

ORDERS OF NOTICE RETURNABLE THIS DAT. 

The following orders of notice returnable this day 
were severally recommitted to the Committee on 
Streets without objection : 

Order of notice upon the widening of Summer street 
on its northerly side at the corner of High street. 

Order of notice upon the construction of a sewer 
upon Wareham strei I. 

Order of notice upon the construction of a sewer on 
Tremont street, from Benton to Kendall street. 

The order of notice concerning the extension of Ot- 
tawa street, from Sherman to Warren street, was re- 
committed. Mr. Lyman Mason appeared, objecting 
to the same as interfering with the work already com- 
menced by Garlic, who proposed to erect a class of 
houses very desirable for mechanics and others, and 
to whom any change of location would be a great ex- 
pense; and there would result a needless waste of 
land. The damage would be Of SO much consequence 
to Mr. Garlic that it deserveda more careful consider- 
ation than can be given to the subject by the Board 
at its session. 

Upon the order of notice upon the assessment of 
betterments by the widening of High street, Messrs 
Michael H. Gleason, Jaffrey Richardson, Josiah M" 



:: 1 



PROCEEDINCis OF CITY < '< > UNCLL.. 



Jones, Thomas E. Proctor, Samuel 6. Arnold, and 

rsaac Rich, appeared and rei istrated against the 

same; and a written statement ol objection was pre 
Bented from Mr. Joseph B. Moore. The order of no- 
tice was recommitted. 

ORDERS ol NOTICE. 

The following orders of notice were road and 
passed : 

Order of notice upon the discontinuance of a por- 
tion of Matthews street adjoining the estate ofthe 
heir- of John P. Thorndike 

Order of notice upon the discontinuance of a por- 
tion of Northampton street adjoining the land of the 
Boston Water Row er Co. 

Order (if notice upon the widening of Harrison av- 
enue, on it- easterly Bide, at the corner of Dover 
street. 

Order of notice to H. Filhiol, guardian of Roger 
Herring, t<> vacate land projecting over the proposed 
line of Marion street. 

Order or notice concerning expediency of construct- 
ing a sewer in Broadway between B Btreet and the 
Boston, Hartford and Erie Railroad. 

Order of notice concerning expediency of construct- 
ing a sewer in London street, between Meridian and 
l ecatur street s. 

UNFINISHED BUSINESS. 

The order to pay Charles AW Oalloupe s*.">.>.ooo for 
land taken in the widening of Tremont Btreet, was 
passed, being for estates numbered as follow.- : 
Estate No. 213, 215 Tremont street, !ifi">.0 square feet. 
•• JIT, 219, 221 •• •• 1387.0 " " 

'• 271, 27:!, 27.~> " '• 999.61 " 

" " 22:5 " '• 47.S.O '• " 

Ql VRTERLY REPOETS. 

Report of Superintendent of Health, stating the ex- 
pense for the quarter to have been, for sweeping and 
cleaning the streets, removal of ashes, offal, &c, 
cleaning cesspools and abating nuisances, $68,695 si: 
the demands against sundry persons for abating nui- 
sances, sewer work, material sold, Ac, the hills for 
which have been deposited with the City Treasurer 
for collection. (3556 38 : the amount paid into the Citj 
Treasury and credited to this department, (474132. 
Report read and sent down for concurrence. 

Report ofthe Inspector of Lighters, stating that the 
fees received for the quarter amount to (1028 95; the 
expense of office, $59 40; leaving an income of $969 35. 
Report read and sent down for concurrence. 

Report of Chief of Police presenting a statement of 
the doings .of the Department, a summary of which 
is as follow - : 

Arrested 5284 Lodgers 4387 

( lommitted 4.S!)(i Males 3088 

.Male- 4S:57 Foreigners 274(» 

Foreigners 40|7 Non-residents :>244 

Non-residents 1004 Minors <i(J4 

Minors 11(H) 

Report read and sent down for concurrence. 

Report ofthe Paymaster of the executive Committee 
on Soldiers' Relief, which states that there lias been 
received from the treasurer of the City $26,500; bal- 
ance on hand July 1st. $120; disbursed to disabled 
soldiers and their families, $26,076; leaving a balance 
on hand of $514. Report read and sent down for 
concurrence. 

Report Of the Superintendent of Public Lands, Stat- 
ing the amount received from sales of land-, &c, to 
be $43,975 ">:!. and the expense- to be S771 42. Report 
laid on the table and ordered to be printed. 

Report of James D. Cadogan, Sealer Of Weights and 
Measures (Southern District), stating the amount re- 
ceived for sealing, adjusting, repairing, and transpor- 
tation Of scale-, weights, and measure'- to amount 
to $37871. \l-o. report of William F. Reed Northern 
District), stating the amount received for the same to 
be s:!7"> 70. 

REPORTS OF COMMITTEES. 

Alderman Talbot, from the Committee on Street-. 

reported in favor ofthe petition of John P. Townsend, 
for the laying out and grading of Rockland street. 
Accepted. 

Alderman Richard.-, from the Committee on Public 
Buildings, submitted a report which was laid upon 
the table and ordered to be printed, in which they re- 
port inexpedient to erect a building for the criminal 
courts in the Jail yard. Accepted. 

Alderman Messinger, from the Committee on Health 
reported recommending the reference to the Commit- 
tee on Sewers of the petition of Catherine Ray and 
other- for abatement of a nuisance proceeding from 
the Purchase Btreet -ewer. Accepted. 



Also iD favor Of the petition of Robert .Moore for 
leave to erect a -table Ibr more than four horses at 04 
Endicotl street. Report accepted. 

Also no action required on petition ofE. W. James 
and others for dredging out the dock at the foot ox 

Poplar Btreet. Report accepted. 

Alderman Paul from fie Committee on Ordinances, 
who wen- instructed to report by what authority ex- 
clusive right has been given to the proprietors of cer- 
tain hacks to occupy stand- in the -treet- against 
some ol the railroad depot- in this city, report that it 
do,-- not appear upon Investigation that any discrim- 
ination is made in granting stand- for hacks in the 
vicinity of railroad station-. Report accepted. 

Alderman White, from the Committee on Licenses, 
reported in favor of granting sundry licenses. Re- 
port accepted. 

Alderman Messinger, from the Committee on 
Health, reported an order abating main nuisances, 
which was passed. 

Alderman Talbot, from the Committee on Streets, 
reported no action necessary on sundry notice- of 
intention to build presented at the last meeting. Re- 
port accepted. 

ORDERS TO PAT. 

The following orders to pay certain individuals the 
sum- named were passed: 

Order to pay to the several companies of volunteer 
militia certified by the Adjutant General. Oct. .!. 1- -. 
the sums respectively allowed them, amounting to 
$32,004 50, said sum to be charged to the appropria- 
tion for military bounty. 

Oi-der to pay Susan Wesson $565 for damage to her 
estate in Ruggles -treet. 

Order to pay Thomas Lord and other- $19,000 tor 
land taken and damages occasioned by the widening 
of Tremont -treet. 

Order to pay John Origgs $364 for damage to hi- es- 
tate, 558 Shawmut avenue by the grading of said 
avenue. 

( >rder to pay Arthur Libbey $600 for damages to his 
e-tate, 506 Shaw unit avenue. 

ORDERS PA8SED. 

Order requesting the Mayor to petition the Legisla- 
ture for leave to lay out and construct a public .-treet 
or way across the South Bay from some point at or 
near Pine Island to f ome point in or near Washing- 
ton Village. 

Order tliat the Auditor of Accounts be authorized 
to transfer $25,000 from the Reserved Lund to the Ap- 
propriation for Sewers. 

Order revoking the license of David B. Arthur for 
cause. 

Order instructing the City Engineer to inspect, un- 
der the direction of the Committee on License-, the 
building recently erected on Tremont street, to be 
used as a place of amusement, and known as a Skating 
Rink. 

Order instructing the Committee on Public Build- 
ing- to consider the expediency of purchasing a .-trip 
ot land adjoining the Engine House and Ward Room, 
on the corner of Dorchester and Fourth street-. 

Order instructing the Committee on Bridges to ex- 
pend a -um not exceeding SUDO on repairing Meridian 
street bridge. 

Order authorizing the Committee on Laying Out 
and Widening Streets to purchase the estate in tue 
rear of Tremont street on Kuhn place and to sell the 
same to Thomas Lord for the sum of $20,000. 

Order authorizing the Committee on Public Build- 
ings to tender the free use of the building formerly 
used for the Roxbury Almshouse to the Directors of 
the Discharged Soldiers' Home, until otherwise or- 
dered by the City Council. 

Order authorizing the City surveyor, under the di- 
rection of the joint special committee on the Suffolk 
street District, so called, to make surveys, estimates 
and descriptions ofthe territory described in chapter 
277 of the acts ofthe year 1868; and that the -aid com- 
mittee he authorized to employ competent persons to 
examine the titles of such portions ot' the property 
within the said district as they -hall deem necessary, 
atan expense not exceeding $4000, said sum to be trans- 
ferred lor that purpose from tin- "reserved fund." 

WIDENING OP HANOVER STREET. 

On motion of Alderman Messinger, the Board took 
from the table the motion of Alderman Pratt that the 
Committee on -licit- report an order of notice to wi- 
den Hanover Btreet, from Court to Richmond streets, 
and said motion having been amended by substituting 
Blackstone tor Richmond -treet. was passed. 



PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



:{-"> 



EXTENSION OF BROADWAY. 

On motion of Alderman Pratt, the Board took from 
the table and adopted Alderman James's motion that 
the Committee on streets report an order of notice for 
the extension of Broadway at high grade. 

ENGINEER'S AND SURVEYOR'S DEPARTMENTS. 

In pursuance of an order approved Sept. 25th, the 
Committee on Ordinances reported two ordinances 
relating to the Department of the City Engineer and 
the City Surveyor, the purpose of which is to repeal 
the ordinance of 1866, which established the depart- 
ment and prescribed its duties and to establish the 
same as two departments, separate and distinct from 
each other, under the same general rides and regula- 
tions heretofore. 

The report was accepted and the ordinances were 
passed. 

Adjourned. 



Proceedings of the Common Council, 



OCT. 8, 186S. 



The Common Council held their regular meeting at 
7y 2 o'clock 1'. M., the President in the chair, forty-nine 
members being present. 

FROM IRE BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 

Petitions were severally referred in concurrence. 

The quarterly reports of the Hayweigher, the In- 
spector of Lighters, the Superintendent of Health, the 
Paymaster of State Aid, were severally ordered to be 
placed on file. 

Upon the question of concurrence in the amendment 
adopted by the Board of Aldermen concerning drink- 
ing hydrants, charging the expense of the same to the 
appropriation for "water works" instead of to '•inci- 
dental expenses and miscellaneous claims," the Com- 
mon Council adhered to its former action. 

The order was passed instructing the Committee on 
Public Buildings to consider the expediency of pur- 
chasing a strip of land adjoining the Engine House 
and Ward Room on Dorchester and Fourth streets. 

The order was passed authorizing tiie purchase of 
the estate of C. A. Freeman and E. Porter, in the rear 
of Tremont street, and the sale of the same to T. Lord. 

The order requesting the Mayor to petition the Leg- 
islature for leave to construct a new street across the 
South Bay was referred to the Committee on streets 
on the part of the Common Council. 

The order from the Board of Aldermen, authorizing 
the Committee on Public Buildings to tender to the 
Directors of the Discharged Soldiers' Home the free 
use of the building formerly occupied as an Alms- 
house in Boston Highlands, 'until otherwise ordered, 
and also authorizing the Mayor to convey to the Trus- 
tees lor the Home for Aged Men the "Home" estate 
on Springfield street, was, on motion of Mr. Osborn, 
laid on the table, but was subsequently taken up ami 
passed in concurrence. 

The report was accepted in concurrence upon an 
order concerning hack stands, stating that it did not 
appear to the committee that there was any discrimin- 
ation made in granting such stands at the railroad 
stations. 

The ordinances providing for separate departments 
for City Engineer and City Surveyor were passed in 
concurrence, after being so amended as to provide 
that the Engineer and Surveyor, chosen according to 
the provisions of section 2, shall be citizens of the city 
of Boston. 

Mr. Wilson of Ward Twelve considered it proper 
that the Committee upon the Surveyor's Department, 
should have some direct oversight of the making of 
plans, surveys, estimates, etc, and moved to so amend 
section 2 as to provide that said surveys be made un- 
der the direction of the Committee on Surveyor's De- 
partment. The committee, he said, was at the pres- 
ent time more a committee of ornament than of use. 
Any committee, or any alderman, could procure the 
making of. surveys and the making of plans to an ex- 



pense of a thousand dollars, and, as in one case, fif- 
teen hundred dollars ; and there had been many sur- 
veys made which had involved a very considerable 
expense which were of no value whatever. 

Mr. Train of Ward Three would be very happy to 
agree with the gentleman in his motion if he did not, 
think that the amendment would throw the Depart- 
ment and the City Government into very great con- 
fusion. There should In no such antagonism as would 
very likely arise between the different departments 
and the committee on the Surveyor's Department; and 
it was not designed ever that that committee should 
have the control of the scientific duties of the sur- 
veyor. 

Mr. Wilson claimed that in practice it would be 
found that the amendment offered would not throw 
the affairs of the city into confusion, but on the con- 
trary it would be found that it would throw some 
check upon the disbursements of that office. The 
committee had now no power other than to approve 
the bills and lix the payment of those employed. This 
department was the only one where any and every 
committee could go and have work done at their own 
discretion. A similar liberty towards the Committee 
on Streets or the Committee on Sewers would evident- 
ly work unfavorably. The whole object of the amend- 
ment was to put a check upon one of the greatest 
abuses in connection with any of the departments. 

Mr. Wadswortb. of Ward Four found both reasons 
for and objections to the amendment, but, deemed it 
inexpedient to be adopted. 

Mr. Denny of Ward Ten thought no remedy was ob- 
tained by the amendment, inasmuch asone Committee 
could be trusted in a matter of this kind as well as any 
other Committee. 

The amendment was rejected. 

The order authorizing a transfer of $2."), 000 from the 
Reserved Fund to the appropriation for sewers, was 
passed by a unanimous vote. 

'flie report of the Committee upon the subject of the 
Suffolk street Grades and Drainage was accepted; 
and the order authorizing the making of surveys, esti- 
mates and description of the territory was passed by a 
vote of 48 to 1. 

UNFINISHED BUSINESS. 

The order authorizing alterations in the building oc- 
cupied by Steam Engine Company No. 4, at an expense 
not exceeding $5000, was referred *to the Committee 
on Public Buildings. 

Also the order authorizing the purchase of land on 
North square, or its vicinity, and the erection thereon 
of a building for steam Engine Company No. 8, and au- 
thorizing a loan of $20,000 for the same. 

QUARTERLY REPORT. 

The quarterly report of the Auditor of Accounts 
was presented, made in compliance with the ordi- 
nance on Finance, giving a statement of the general 
and special appropriations for the present financial 
year, 1868-69, as shown in the books of his office, Oct. 
1,1868, including October draft, being six months pay- 
ment of the financial year, exhibiting the original ap- 
proprations, the amount expended, and the balances 
unexpended Oct. 1. 

The recapitulation of general and special appro- 
priations and expenses is as follows: 

ApproprationS] 

Revenues, &c. Expended. Unexpended. 
General.. §7,009,61)1 77 $2,884,091 30 $4,215,600 47 

Special.. 3,306,728 42 1,149,708 50 2,246,929 92 

$10,496,420 19 $4,083,889 80 6,462,530 39 

The general appropriations and expenses are stat- 
ed as follows; 

Object of Amt. of each Bal. 

Appropriations. Appropria'n. Expend'd. Unexpen'd 

Advertising $6,00000 $1,93536 $4,06464 

Annuities 1,20000 455 00 745 00 

Armories 16,00000 6,91311 9,086 89 

Bells ami Clocks. 2,225 00 759 85 1,465 15 

Boston Harbor.. 9,300 00 2,03197 6,668 03 

Bridges 15,000 00 9,869 15 5,130 85 

Cemeteries 11,490 00 6,313 98 5,17602 

CityDept 417,000 00 161,172 00 255,82800 

City Hospital 85,00000 51,05185 33,94815 

Common, etc 55,442 00 35,619 83 19,82217 

County of Suffolk. 240,000 00 92,406 08 147,593 02 
Engineer's and 
Surveyor's De- 
partment 25,000 00 11,404 26 13,535 74 

Fire Alarm 4o.ooo 00 17,109 23 22,890 77 

Fire Department. 231,870 00 109,500 91 122,309 0!) 



36 



PROOF FOINQ-S OF CITY COUNCIL. 



68,00 i 

2, hi 

277,500 nil 



26,00000 

1,500 00 

58,000 00 

800,000 00 

544,984 00 

25,000 10 

60,000 00 



i Irammar School- 
house, Ward II. 

/ [arbor Dredging. 

Health Departm'l 

i ateresl and Pre- 
iniiini 615,00000 

fncidental Expen's 75,00000 

Lamps 326,40000 

Markets 9,00000 

Militia Bounty... 50, 100 

Mt. Hope (vino.] 
tery, add Rev- ( 
enue Received f 
$7615 77 J 

Old Claims 

Oversei rs of the 
Poor 

Paving, etc 

Police 

Publi.s Baths 

Public Buildings.. 

Public institutions 
viz : House <>i' 
Industry 

House of Correc- 
tion 

Lunatic Hospital 

Quarantine estab- 
lishment 

Steamboat "II. 
Morrison" 

Pauper Expen- 
ses 15,00000 

General Expen- 
ses at City Of 
fice 

New Building for 
Pauper Gins. . 

New Workshop 
House of Cor- 
rection 

Public Lauds — 

Public Library. . 

Printing and Sta- 
tionery 

Reserved Fund.. 

Salaries ll:l,000 00 

Miii Mils and School 
Houses, viz. : 

High and Gram- 
mar School In- 
structors 

Gram'r Schools, 
Public Build- 
ings. 

Gram'r 

School 
tee .. 

Salaries Officers 
School Commit- 
tee 

Primary school 
Instructors — 

Primary Schools, 
Public Build'gs 

Primary Schools, 
School Com- 
mittee 11.S20 00 

Scalers Weights 
and Measures. . 

Sewers and Drains 

State Tax 

War Expenses. . . 

Water Works 



Schools, 
Commit- 



80,000 00 

00,000 00 

8,000 00 
14,000 00 



7,000 00 
30,000 00 



33,000 00 
20,000 00 
50,000 00 

30.000 00 
*185,725 00 



506,350 00 

90,000 00 

46,820 00 

17,500 00 
260,750 00 

sd.odiiou 



6,200 00 

50,000 00 

724,000 00 

5,000 00 

161,000 00 



41,71294 

709 75 

140,496 hi 

297,319 (6 

60,552 15 

119,090 59 

3,699 26 

5,525 00 

25,833 "ill 

90 Oil 

20,000 00 

242,267 32 

252,530 53 

16,3*3 86 

44,124 118 



129,00000 61,686 67 



35,573 43 
29,318 71 

2,46155 

4,934 50 

3,032 17 

3,380 06 



254,63651 

55,364 93 

18,612 29 

0,314 34 
131,929 69 
40,580 43 



2,692 27 
43,863 71 

896 00 
93,570 85 



26,287 08 

1,290 25 

137,008 81 

817,680 54 
14,447 55 

207,309 II 
5,300 71 
14,475 00 

7,782 21 

1,410 00 

38 000 00 

57,732 68 

292,453 47 

8,61614 

15,875 02 

(17.313 33 

44,42 1 57 
30,681 29 

5,538 45 

9,065 50 

11,967 83 

3,619 94 
30*000 00 



15,000 00 18,000 00 

10,82716 9,17284 

27,80117 22,1ns S3 

14,433 57 15,566 43 

30.000 00 140.725 00 

00,444 22 40,555 7s 



25l,713 4!i 

34,035 07 

28,207 71 

8,185 00 
123,820 31 

311,410 57 



1,554 06 10,265 94 



3.507 73 

0,130 20 

724,000 00 

1.104 00 

07.120 15 



*The following amounts have been transferred from 
the Reserved Fund to the following general appropri- 
ations, viz : 

Mi mnt Hope Cemetery $14,000 00 

Public Lands 8,000 00 

New Work Shop. House oft orrection. 8,000 00 

Fire Department 23,000 00 

Common, etc 11,275 00 



Water Works, Int. 

and Premium. . . 

Widening Streel s. 



SO 1,275 00 



501,000 00 

•JIM. nun (in 



99,804 50 

31 1.770 14 



401, 195 50 
160,220 86 



Total appropria- 
tions $7,092,076 00 $2,884,091 80 $4,215,600 47 

Add Revenue 7,615 77 



$7,099,691 



REPORTS <il ' OMMIT1 I 

Mr. Stevens of War! Six, from ihc Committee on 
Streets ou the part of th I immon Council, v 

mended the pa.-- i . c "I ' I'.i ! Order extending Brimmer 

st ret, at an expense of $26,000. K sport accepted and 
order passed. 

Also in favor of the order extending < lolumbus ave- 
nue 80 feel in width from Ferdinand str el i" Church 
street. Report accepted, and order passed by a vote 
of30 to 10. 

Also in favor of the order extending High streel at 
an expense of $70,000. 

Mr. Bishop of Ward Seven considered the exp 
immense and uncalled for. 

Mr. Jenks Of Ward Three thought it SO much money 
thrown to the winds. 

Mr. Parker of Ward Fourteen stated thai the evi- 
dence before the committee was thai nearly one-half 
of the territory was to be built on during the coming 
year, and had been purchased with the idea thai the 
street was to be widened, and the owner.-, were w ill- 
in.tr in pay for it. 

The report was accepted and the order laid on the 

table. 

The Committee also recommended the passage of 
the order to widen Matthew s stieet by taking land of 
David Snow. and others. Report accepted and order 
laid upon the table. 

The same Committee also submitted a lengthy re- 
port upon the report of the C tnittee on Pa 

asking for an additional appropriation of $100,000. 
The report was. on motion of Mr. Bishop, laid upon 
the table and ordered to be printed, including the re- 
ports connected with it from the different departments. 

The same Committee recommended the passage of 
the order authorizing the Committee on Bridges to 
expend a sum not exceeding $2000 in repairing the 
roadway over the Chelsea Street Bridge. Report ac- 
cepted, and order passed by a vote of 43 to 3. 

PETITION PRESEN I Kl>. 

Petition of A. L. Pe Ribas for compensation for per- 
sonal injuries. Referred to the Committee on Claims. 
Adjourned. 



Proceedings of Board of Aldermen, 



OCT. 12, ISO 8. 



The Board of Aldermen held their regular meeting 
at the usual hour, Mayor Shurtleffin the chair. 

PETITIONS PRESENTED AND REFERRED. 

Petition of Wm. W. Nichols and others that a re- 
ward be offered for the detection of persons throwing 
missiles at political processions. Referred to the 
Committee on the Police. 

Petition of Edward .J. Jones. Constable of this Com- 
monwealth, that the duties under the 14th section of 
the I, icec.se Law lie conferred on him and his deputies. 
Referred to the Committee on Licenses. 

Petition of S. S. Gray and other- that .-tone steps be 
placed at the northeast and northwest corners at "In- 
dependence square." Referred to the Committee on 
( lommon and Squares. 

Petition of K. A. Cushman for a lamp in Lin wood 
square. Referred to the Committee on Lamps. 

Petition of William Holtzer, lessee, to be paid for 
damages sustained by widening of Tremoni street. 
To the Committee on Stre< ts. 

Petition of George T. Bigelow that the west side of 
Court square be paved with the Nicolson pavement. 
To the Committee on Paving. 

Petition of R. IS. Leuchars and others that Appleton, 
Dartmouth and (anion streets may ho graded and 
have cutters paved, &C. To the Committee oil Paving. 

Petition of Wilder [Seal and others for a sewer in 
( labot sPeet. from Sunnier place tn Washington street. 
To the ( oininittee on streets. 

Petition of E. S. Johnson for extension of Lenox 
streel sewer. To the Committee on Sewers. 

Petition of iSenj. Drew for the grading of Broadway 
and C> street. To the Committee on Paving. 



PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COTJTSTCTL. 



37 



Petition oil'. H. McGlynn and other i, that the grade 
of Last Dedham street be raised. To the same com- 
mit!, e. 

Petition of Daniel W. Beckler and o hers that he be 
paid for grade damages to his estate on Fifth street. 
To the same committee. 

Petition of M. Doherty and others for use of Faneuil 
Hall Oct. Hi. Petition of C. G. A two id and others, 
for use of Faneuil Hall Oct. 28. Both i eferred to Com- 
mittee on Faneuil Hall, with full powers. 

The petition of Sidney Squires and (thers that ar- 
rangements be made for revision of the voting lists in 
all the wards was read and placed on tile. 

COMMUNICATIONS RECEIVED. 

A communication was received and placed on file 
from the Metropolitan Railroad, statin" that that cor- 
poration had accepted the seventeenth location, being' 
on Shawmut avenue, between Dale and Townsend 
streets, w itli turnout. 

A communication assessing the cost of sewers on 
Ruggles, Vernon, Washington and c her street-, a- 
niotinting to $14, .">_»:> :ii, was referred to the Committee 
on Sewers. 

A communication from the City Physician relating 
to improperly drained tenements. No-. Kit to 114 War- 
renton street', was referred to the Comn ittee on Health. 

INTENTIONS TO BUILD, 

Charles A. Fox, Brimmer street; F >x & Studley, 
northeast corner of Boylston and Berkeley streets; 
John U Cary, Morelanrt, between W'a Ten and ('lev - 
land streets; John Driscoll, E, betwe in Seventh an I 
Eight street-; Cummings & Sears, Brimmer street, 
between Mount Vernon and Pinckney Streets; H. (>. 
Downing, 24 Causeway street; Horace Jenkins, M, 
between Filth and Sixth streets. South Boston; S. W. 
Merrill 40 Knceland street ; < '. F. Coflit , corner Broad- 
way and L street, South Boston; J. L. Lower-, Midi tie, 
between Federal and Dorchester streets, South 
Boston: H. F Hathway, Broadway, between 1! and C 
.streets, South Boston; Joseph Milman, .junction of 
Tremont and Cabot street- : Burrlll&Whitney, II, be- 
tween Broadway and Fourth street; J imes Breiinan, 
London, between Porter and Benn ngton streets, 
East Boston; L. A. Reiter, Suffolk, between Chipman 
and Castle streets; C. J. Spenceley, iCendall street; 
Charles L. Wilbur, New , between Sumner and Mav- 
erick streets, East Boston; F. A. Richardson, West 
Cedar, between Revere and Phillips treets; Joseph 
Soberer, Belmont, between Ruggles and Vonron 
streets. 

QUARTERLY REPORTS. 

The quarterly reports of the several Truant Officers, 
gave the following result of their labors 

Cases investigated, 2094, old truant- previously re- 
porl id, 49, new cases, Jii4; found to he truants," 153; 
aggregate absence by truancy, 544 ; complaints, before 
Municipal Court — habitual truant-, 12; on probation, 
3; sent to House of Reformation, 19; absentees. 19; 
before the Judge of Probate — number complained of 
for offences other than truancy, f>; sentenced to the 
State Ruform School, 1 ; sentenced to tie School ship, 
3; sentenced to Industrial School for G rls, 1. 

The quarterly report of the City Physicion for the 
last quarter shows that there had been vaccinnated 
1!).") persons; certificates for public schools, 103; physi- 
cians supplied with vaccine lymph, 15. Read and 
sent down. 

The Superintendent of Streets reported that there 
had been expended and charged to the appropriation 
for paving during the quarter ending the 30th ult. for 
paving, grading and repairs of streets n the > 't.v pro- 
per, East and South Boston and the Bos on Highlands, 
$153,86090. There Mere bills lodged with the City 
Treasurer, during the same period, for edgestones, 
&i'., amounting to slot.") (IS. The amount paid into the 
City Treasury during the same quarter, and credited to 
the Paving Department, was $ 1(14-2 (iT. 

COMMON COUNCIL PAPERS. 

Petitions were referred in concurren 'e, also orders 
as fellows; 

Order to provide a new site for Engine House No. 8, 
near North square. ($20,000.) 

Order to make alterations in Engine Louse 4. (S'wno.) 

The ordinance relating to City Engineer's Depart- 
ment was amended in COncurr nice so as to provide 
that said offi :er sh til be a "citizen of I OSt >n." 

The order for Drinking Fountains, amended so as 
to charge fie expense to "Incidental Expenses," being 
on concurrence — 

Alderman Messenger said he had con 'erred with the 
Auditor on the subject, and it was t.iought that as 



some committee should have charge of these fountains, 
it would be better to amend so as to charge the ex- 
pense to the Health Department. He moved so to 
amend, which was carried. 

The Auditor's Monthly Exhibit for October was 
laid on file. 

UNFINISHED BUSINESS. 

Ordered, That the Committee on Public Buildings 
be authorized to erect a Police Station and Ward 
Room on the lot Of land belonging to the city situated 
at the corner of Palnnr and short streets," in Ward 
Thirteen, at a cost not exceeding $40,000. [II ported 
bj the Committee on Public Buildings in a new u.-ait.J 

Ordered, That the Treasurer be authorized to bor- 
row, under the direction ofthe Committee on Finance, 
the sum of $10,000, to be appropriated to the erection 
of a Police Station House' and Hard Room in Ward 
Thirteen, 

These orders was passed — yeas 11, nays none. 

Ordered, That the Committee on Public Buildings 
he authorized to purchase a lot of land on Washing- 
ton street, near the junction of Cabot street, cot t lin- 
ing about 10,000 leet a tan expense not exceeding $8000, 
for the purpose of erecting upon the same a house 
(containing a Ward Room) for Hook and Ladder 
Co. No. 4. ' 

Ordered, That the City Treasurer be and he is hereby 
directed to borrow $8000, under the direction of the 
Committee on Finance, lor the purchase of a puce of 
land on Washington street, Ward Fourteen, for the 
purpose of erecting a Hook and Ladder house for 
Company No. 4, and a Ward Room for Ward Fourteen, 

These orders were adopted. 

ORDERS OF NOTRE RECOMMITTED. 

Order of notice on widening of Green street (without 
objection). 

Order of notice on construction of sewer on Broad- 
way, between B street and the Boston, Hartford & 
Erie Railroad (no one objecting). 

Order of notice on construction of sewer in London 
street, between Meridian and Decatur streets, (no one 
objecting). 

Order of notice on proposed widening of Dove r stre< t 
(no objection). 

Order of notice on location of Broadway Railroad 
througu Cove sired. Mr. Bates for petitioners, stated 
that as a location had been grai.t d to the Marginal 
Freight Railroad for two tracks through that stre< t it 
would be more desirable to authorize this road to run 
over those tracks instead of laying additional ones. 

WIDENING OF BERLIN STREET. 

The remonstrance of Joseph Read aud others against 
the widening of Berlin street on the north side was 
heard, Joseph Nickcrson appearing for remonstrants. 

Mr. Nickerson advocated the first order, which was 
before the board and read once, for the widening of 
the street on the southerly bide, as being the lea.-t 
expensive measure. There were fewer estates to 
settle, there being twelve owners and fifteen buihii igs 
on the north side while there were but seven est. tes 
ami six buildings on the southerly side. Differei.t 
estimates were submitted, showing valuation and cost 
of widening on the northerly side from $26,00(1 to 
$31,200, and on the southerly side, from $15,300 to 
§24,00,1. The vacant land between Berlin aud 8 law mut 
streets would give ample room for the widening of 
both of those streets, with a good space for the rear. 
The cutting off on the northerly side would not make a 
straight line with Tennyson street, and even il it should 
do so, the travel would not be dkely to be through 
those streets to Columbus avenue 

Nathaniel F. Safford, called for remonstrant', ex- 
pressed the opiidon that the widening could belt r 1 e 
made on the southerly side ofthe street, and with less 
expense, while the betterments assessed would be 
more advantageous with t le widening o i th it side. 

Mr. Taylor, owner of property on lier.i.i street, 
agreed with Mr. Sill'ord and with Mr. Niikerso l, and 
assented to the estimates which were submitted. He 
thought the difference in expense would be $11,080 to 
$)2,<ioOii favor Ofthe southerly side, and had heard 
cf i o opposition to the widening on that side. 

Alderman Talbot moved that the remonstrance he 
laid on the table. 

Alderman Woodman hoped the whole Board would 
visit the premises before t iking final action. 

Alderman Talbot opposed any postponement of final 
action, from the necessity of taking measures at once 
for the widening of the street before the (dose of the 
season. 

Alderman Richards said he ben 'ved the remonstrants 
labored under u misapprehension in relation u> the 



PJIOCEEDINO-R OF CITY COUNCIL. 



proposed w idening of the street on the northei Ij side. 
li appeared i> have been the impression that the 
buildings on the northerlj side would be torn 'own, 
imi he could assure fie parti is that the Commit! se on 
the Church St. District had □ > disposition to do injus- 
tice to any one. A1 first ii might look as though the 
widening should be on the southerly side, but it \ ould 
be seen thai the proposed widening would imUce a 
straight line wiih the northerly line of Tennyson 
street. l>\ taking the land on the northerly side, 
there would be left, after the removal of the bull lings 
back on Shawmul street, a strip of land wide ei oujjh 
for a class of buildings suitable for that locality, which, 
if the widening should be <>n that side, would be lost 
for profitable use. Instead of costing $26,000 li ■ did 
not think the*proposed w idening would cost moir than 
half that sum. No house m to be raised will be de- 
molished. 

The motion to lay the r smonstranceon the tab] ■ was 
carried, and Alderman Woodman withdrew his n otion 
for dela.\ . 

The second reading or the order was passed over, 
and subsequently Alderman Talbot stated tl i i ii 

would not lie necessary to art upon it at this session 
Of the hoard. 

REPORTS OF COMMITTEES. 

Alderman Whits, from the Committee on Lic< rises, 
reported in favor of the license of several perso is as 
common victuallers, three boys as bootblacks, and 
four as newsboys. Accepted. 

Alderman Pratt, from the Committee on ( sme- 
teries, reported leave to withdraw on the petition of 
L. I). Davenport for leave to purchase a portion of 
the old burial ground on the corner Of Washington 
and Eustis streets. Accepted 

Alderman Woodman, from the Committee on Mar- 
kets, reported in favor of a transfer of lease of Stall 
No. li» New Faneuil Hall Market, from Moses Paul to 
Cyrus <;. Dole. Accept d. 

Alderman Paul, from the Committee on sewer.-, re- 
ported an order, which was adopted, requiring M> ssrs. 
Brewer &Fowle, No. 15!) Purchase street, to ah d ' a 
nuisance caused by blowing steam into the Common 
sewer in purchase street; otherwise, for cutting oil" 
t he drain. 

Alderman James, from the Committee on Paving, 
reported on the petition of Lewis Prang, an order of 
notice requiring the Metropolitan Railroad Co. to 
appear before the Board on the 26th October, and 
slow cause why their tracks on Washington street, 
near Gardner street, should not be removed. Accep- 
ted. 

Alderman Talbot, from the Committee on streets, re- 
ported no action necsssary on sundry notices of in- 
tentions to build. Accepted. 

ORDERS OP NOTICE. 

Orders of notice for hearings on various matters, 
reported from the C unmittee on streets and sewers, 
Alderman Talbot and Paul chairman, were I dop- 
ted, as follows : 

On petition of Artmas R. Holden ami others for an 
extension af Allen street, forty feet in width, from 
Brighton street to North Charles street, Oct. 26. 

On widening of Bedford street by taking laud of 
trustee of estates of J. H. Foster and others, Oct. 2'>. 

On laying out Berkel >y street from Chandler to 
Providence street, Oct. 26. 

On widening South Cedar street, southerly side. 
between Pleasant street and Ferdinand street, Oct. 
26. 

On construction of a sewer in Kendall street, north 
from Sh iwnmt avenue, Oct. 19. 

On petition of Jacobs & Deaue for a stable for more 
than four horses on Worcester street, Oct, 19. 

For the laying out of Montgomery street, between 
Clarendon and West Canton str sets, Oct. 26. 

On report for the' extension of Broadway sixty feet 
in width from Federal street to Albany street, Oct. 
26. 

On report for the widening of Hanover street sixty 
feet in width from Court street to Blackstone st vet: 
also on thenortherlv side, at the corner of Portland 
street, Oct. '.'it. 

WARRANT FOR ELECTION". 
Ordered. That warrants be issued for the meeting 
of the legal voters of this City in their respective 
wards on Tuesday, the 3d day of November next, 
at eight o'clock A.M., then and there to give in their 
ball >ts for twelve electors of President and Vice Resi- 
dent oft ie United state-, each ballot for such elect >rs 
to contain the name of at least one inhabitant of iach 



Congressional district of this Commonwealth. Also 
for a Governor, Lieutenant Governor, two members 

of Congress from District Three and Pour, two Coun- 
cillors for Districts Three and hour, a secretary, 
Treasurer, and Receiver General, an Auditor, and an 
Vttorney Ceneral, six Senators from Suffolk county, 
one Senator from Norfolk county, thirty-three Repre- 
sentatives from Suffolk county, ami four Repre- 
sentatives from Norfolk county. Also the follow- 
ing County officers; one License Commissioner, a 
Sheriff, a 'District Attornev, a Register of Probate 
and insolvency, and three Commissioners of Insolven- 
cy. All the foregoing to be voted for on one ballot. 
The polls to be kept open until 4 P.M. 

ORDERS PASSED. 

Order authorizing the Committee on the .Markets 
to visit New York ami other cities, for purposes re- 
lating to markets, &c., the expense not to exceed $1000, 
and to be charged to the appropriation for markets. 

Order authorizing the Committee on Health, with 
the Superintendent or Assistant Superintendent Of 
Health, to visit New York and other cities for sanitary 
information, the expense not to exceed $500, and ti> 
be charged to the appropriation for Health Depart- 
ment. 

Order authorizing the Chief Engineer of the Fire 
Departmentto purchase live Lowry hydrant heads, 
at an expense not exceeding $700 to be charged to 
appropriation for Fire Department. 

Order authorizing the Committee on Health to ex- 
pend $525, in addition to the, amount heretofore al- 
lowed, to complete the dredging of the Hats near 
Charles ami Beacon streets. 

Order authorizing Samuel S.Perkins to construct 
a tenement building in Eliot street, according to Plan 
submited to Committee on Health. 

Order authorizing the Chairman of this Board to 
sell the rights to the new stock of the Continental 
Rank, which belongs to this Board as trustees of the 
Smith fund. 

Orders severally to pay F. J. Abele $318, Anthony 
Down ie $265, and James P. Vogal $409, in full com- 
pensation for damages to their estates by the raising 
of the grade Of shawmut avenue. 

Order to pay John Templeton, trustee, isfiOTG tor 
land taken and damages to estate in widening Tre- 
mont street. 

Order to pay John S. Blair and John Proctor, and 
John Templeton, trust, -e, .•ss,",;), for removing and 
refitting buildings on estate of John Templeton, trus- 
tee, on Tremont street. 

Order notice to quit to parties on the line of exten- 
sion of Brimmer street, as laid out by this Bo trd. 

Order requiring owners and abutters on Highland 
street, between Eliot square and Hawthorne street, to 
lay sidewalks. 

Order directing the owner of the bakery on the 
southeast corner of Washington and East Concord 
streets to pave his driveway with flagging stones. 

Order directing the owner of the Osliorn estate on 
Broadway, near E street, to pave his driveway with 
flagging stones. 

Order requiring the furnishing of edgestones for 
walks on River street north of Mount Vernon street. 

LICENSES REVOKED. 

Mortimer T. Downing, as haekman. 

Timothy O'Leary, newsboy. 

Garrit Barry, collector of grease and bones. 

Alderman Cobb submitted a draft of an ordinance 
regulating the occupation of streets for building pur- 
poses. Referred to the Committee on Ordinances. 

On motion of Alderman Seaver, the petition of the 
East Boston Ferry Company for increase of tolls was 
taken from the table and referred to the Committee on 
Ferries. 

Adjourned. 



PROCEEDINGS OF CITY OOtJTvTCTE. 



m 



Proceedings of the Common Council, 



OCT. 15, 1868. 



The regular weekly meeting of the Common Council 
was heldat the City Hall, at Hi o'clock P.M., the 
President in the chair. 

PETITIONS. 

Petition ofWra. P. Leland, President, in behalf of 
the Boxbury Charitable society, requesting that a 
suitable room in the late City Hall, of Boxbury be 
assigned for occupancy by thV agent <>t' the society. 
Referred to the Committee <m Public Buildings 

Petition of Charles F. Coffin, to be permitted to 
build, to the height of 36 feet, five houses, corner of 
Broadway and L street, instead of32 fe< t, as prescribed 
by city ordinance, Beferred to the .Joint sp. cial Com- 
mittee <»n the Fire Department. 

FROM THE BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 

Quarterly Eeports of the City Physician and Super- 
intendent of Streets. Placed on file. 

Ordinance regulating the occupation of streets for 
building purposes. Beferred in concurrence. 

Report [n favor of orders to purchase land in Ward 
Fourteen, on Washington Street near Cabot street, 
for the purpose of erecting thereon a Ward Boom and 
house for Hook and Ladder Company No. 4, at an 
expense not exceeding $8000, and authorizing a loan 
of that sum. The report was accepted. 

Mr. Hobbs of Ward Fourteen moved so to amend 
She orders as to change the location to the corner of 
Warren and Dudley streets, opposite Engine House 
No. 1_>. Pending the consideration oft lis motion, Mr. 
Bishop of Ward seven moved that the orders be 
referred to the next Citv Government. Adopted. 

Report and orders in favor of the erection of a 
Police station House and Ward Room on land in 
Ward Thirteen, at a cost of $40,000, and authorizing a 
loan of that sum. 

The report was accepted. Mr. Train of Ward Three 
moved that the orders he referred to the next City 
Government, inasmuch as the parties desiring the 
alterations, were not satisfied, and the alterations 
could not be made before another year. 

Mr. Ryan of Ward Thirteen thought that the mem- 
ber from Ward Three had a wrong idea in regard to 
the building. The representatives from that Ward 
were unanimous in the opinion that the location was 
a suitable one. Whatever difference of opinion there 
had been, arose as to the station house in that district. 

The motion to refer to the next City Government 
prevailed by a vote of 16 to 14. 

COMMUNICATION. 

A communication was received from the Auditor of 
Accounts, stating that an execution recovered in the 
Supreme Judicial Court, by John C. Nichols, for dam- 
ages on account of the piles at the landing of the 
People's Ferry Company having been allowed to sway 
over and obstruct the entrance to the dick of the said 
John C. Nichols, has been paid by the Treasurer, 
amounting to $3431 4-2: and that the appropriation for 
repairing and alterating the People's Ferry drops has 
been exhausted. The passage of an order to cover 
the saiil payment is therefore recommended. 

The order was read once, ami laid over. 

REPORTS OF COMMITTEES. 

Mr. Tucker of Ward six, from the Committee on 
the Fire Department, who were requested to con- 
sider whether the ordinances regulating the in- 
spection and storage of petroleum are properly en- 
forced, ami whether additional legislation be nec- 
essary, submitted a detailed report upon the sub- 
ject, stating that it is notorious that inflammable 
oils are manufactured, stored and sold in greater 
quantities than the law allows (500 gallons) with-' 
out any license, or care to prevent the most disas- 
trous result in ease of fire; that as it not made 
the particular duty of any department to institute 
proceedings when the law is vioiatsd, the consequence 
is that it is violated with impunity, and no notice is 
taken of the manner in which a person carries on the. 
business of manufacturing or selling unless he applies 
lor a license; that a thorough revision of the present 
law is necessary, making it more stringent so far as 
concerns the City of Boston. Theconnnilt se therefore 
recommend that the Board of Aldermen instruct the 
Chief-of-Police to report infractions of the law, and 



the City Solicitor to institute proceedings in the same; 
and they also i\ commend the passage oi an order con- 
cerning the passage of a more stringent law on the 
subject. 

The order was read a second time and passed. 
[See orders.] 

Mr. Bean of Ward Eleven, from the Joint Standing 
Committee on Public Buildings, reported that the 
Committee have complied with the (lirec ion of the 
Common Council to procure plans and estimates for a 
hose house for Hose Company No. 3, to be located on 
North Grove street; and they recommend the pass- 
age of three orders, severally setting apart a p it i n 
of land on said street, and authorizing the ( reel io i of 
a building on the same at an expense not c xceeding 
$18,000, and authorizing the Treasur r to In rrow the 
same. The orders were raad once and laidov r. 

Mr. Bean of Ward Eleven, from the Joint Standing 
Committee on Public Buildings, t> whom w s re- 
ferred the order authorizing them 1 make oerfnin al- 
terations in the building now ocenpi d by Kir i e 
Company No. 4, reported tint it will be imp ism >le to 
make any alterations providing suitable ace< mrooda- 
tions for the company in the building at pres i t occu- 
pied by them, for reasons stated in lb ir printed re- 
port previously made ; and the committee th retore 
r commend the passage of the order already passed 

by the Board of Aldermen. 

Mr. Morse of War I Thirteen Imp d the order would 
not pass, as it wis the same one which had pr< \ ii us.y 
been reported against. 

On motion of Mr. Wadsworth of Ward Fourteen, 
the order was laid on the table. 

PHILLIPS SCHOOL-YARD. 

Mr. Osborn of Ward six, from the Committee on 
Public Instruction, to whom was referred the petiti n 
of the trustees of the Twelfth Baptist Church, report- 
ed in favor of granting leave to the same to make an 
extension in the rear of the pulpit of said church edi- 
fice, projecting over the Phi lips schooly rd at I e 

height of tw< nty feet from the ground : provided that 
the said trustees shall execute an ol ligation to the 
city, binding themselves to r move the same at any 

time, upon the order of the Common Council. 

Mr. Jenks of Ward Three hoped the order would 
not pass, believin"- that the children of the school were 
not privileged with any too much li ht and air at pres- 
ent. 

Mr. Osbom stated there was no deprivation in that 
respei t. as the yard was a large one, aud well lighted. 

Mr. Wadsworth of Ward Four considered that the 
proposed projection must cut oil' the light, and should 
vote against the order unless it was shown that t Ik re 
was more light than the children Ollgl t to have. 

Mr. Osborn explained further that from the arrange- 
ment of the buildings it was impossible that an\ ligl t. 
could be cut off by the extension, and i asmuch as it, 
was to be left in the control of the < louncil, lie saw no 
objection to it. 

Mr. Jenks of Ward Three was satisfied that if the 
extension was once erected, it would always r< main, 
so far as any action of the Council was Concerned. 

Mr. Wadsworth claimed that as the projection pro- 
posed mu-t recive the rays of the sun, and become 
heated, and a current of air would be raised, and to 
some extent the projection would be an obstruction 
and a barrier to the circulation of air in the yard, and 
he should oppose any action of the kind. On tin' mo 
tiou of Mr. Wadsworth the ordl r was laid on tne table" 

ORDERS PASSED. 

Order requesting the Mayer I i petition the next 
Legislature in behalf of the City Council of Boston, 
fir the passage of a more striugcnl law in r 'latum to 
the manufacture and storage Of petroleum wit. in the 
limits of the city of Boston. 

APPB (PRIATION FOR VISITORS. 

Mr. Hobbs of Ward Fourteen, from the Committee 
on Public Instruction, presented an order authorizing 
the Committee in tendering hospitalities to a delega- 
tion o' the School Committee of the city of Philadelphia 
about visiting the publicinstitutious of the city, to ex- 
pend a sum not exceeding $1500, the sum to be charged 
to the appropriation for incidental exp aises. 

Mr. Bishop of Ward Seven was opposed t i the 
passage of Such an order, and desired some reason 
from the committee, or some exp] inatiot) of what 
benefit the city ever derives from entertainments of 
this kind. 

Mr. Hob'.s stated that it had been costomarv to ex- 
tend courtesies of this kind to delegations visiting our 
Public Institutions. A delegation from the city of 



4-0 



PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



Boston had been received with special courtesy In 
visiting Philadelphia! and the same courtesy in return 
would appear reasonable enough. 

Mr. Weils of Ward Three considered that the appro- 
priation asked would uot be at all unwarranted, and 
especially in view of the courtesies which bad been 
extended by the eitv of Philadelphia. 

Mr. Bishop opposed the order as a needless appro- 
priation, ami because it was an exclusive affair as 
regarded the committee, it was but a short time since 
the Council bad refused to appropriate for hospitalities 
to a gathering of members from the Army of the James, 
and there was no more occasion for appropriation, in 
the present instance. 

Mr. Jenks of Ward Three considered the present 
instance altogether different from that of the Army 
of the James, and certainly was not a political scheme. 
lie hoped the order would pass. 

Mr. Wright of Ward Twelve stated that it had been 
made known to the Committee on Public instruction, 
thi'ough the School Committee, that these gentlemen 
connected with the educational institutions of Phila- 
delphia — not a very large number, only three or four — 
were coming to the city to make some examination of 
the institutions here; and it was stated that a com- 
mittee from this city hail received very greatattentions 
upon their visit to Philadelphia ; and it had been 
thought by the school committee that it was nothing 
more than courtesy that we should in turn make a pro- 
per acknowledgment. For his own part, he had never 
made much by attempting to oppose anything of this 
kind. Upon first becoming amember of the Council, 
lie had thought it his dutytoopp >se appropriations of 
almost every kind, but had soon pit discouraged. 

He supposed it to be understood that these courtesies 
were proper and should be extended ; and they were 
not made with any view of running the city into debt. 

Mr. Bishop said that the matter appeared still worse 
after the explanation which had been made, inasmuch 
as if there were but, three or four persons there was 
an appropriation of about $350 to a man. The Com- 
mitt te from this city had a sum appropriated for their 
expenses, and if there had been $350 per man appro- 
priated for their entert tiament, in addition, it must 
have been altogether useless. He moved to amend by 
substituting $1003, instead of $1500. 

The proposed amendment was rejected, and the 
order p issed. 

Adjourned. 



Proceedings of Board of Aldermen, 



OCT. 19, 1868. 



The Board of Aldermen held their regular weekly 
meeting at i o'clock P. M.,His Honor Mayor Shurtleff 
in the chair. 

PETITIONS, ETC. 

Petition of Josiah Fiske and R. Emily Fiske, for 
compensation for damages to s lid R. Emily Fiske, by 
defect in a street; referred to Committee on Claims. 

Request of School Committee for a primary school- 
house lot on Appleton street; referred to Committee 
on Public Instruction. 

Complaint of James Feely against police officer J. 
B. Rlanchard, asking f< r public, hearing before the 
Board; referred for hearing to a special meeting to be 
held Nov. 9. 

Petition of the Marginal Freight Railway Company, 
for leave to lay a side track in Haverhill street, north 
of Causeway street, to the warehouses and tracks of 
the Fitchburg and Boston & Maine Railroad Com- 
panies. (Order of notice reported.) 

A copy of a proposed petition of the city of Charles 
town to the next Legislature, for an act to unit-' the 
cities of Boston and Charlestown. Referred to the 
next City Council. 

A copy of a proposed petition to the next Legis- 
lature, bvE. T. North aid and others, for a horse 
railroad from Highland to Summer streets. Referred 
t o Uic ue.xt Board of Aldermen. 



APPOINTMENT. 

The Mayor submitted for approval Die appointment 
of Edward B. w. Restieauxas special police officer, 

without pay, for duty at the Custom House. Con- 
firmed. 

INTENTIONS TO BUILD. 

'flic following notices of intention* to build were 
presented, and severally referred to the Committee on 
Streets : 

Boston .x Albany Railroad Company.Lebigh street, 
between Albany and 8 uah street-; Patrick Coleman, 
Warren street, near Grove Hill avenue; George M. 
Gibson, Beacon street, near the Toll House; < . J. 
Spencely, Lenox street, between Shawmnt avenue and 
Tremont street; G. W. Meserve, ha Harrison avenue; 
Dennis Warren, corner A and Third stieets: Nath- 
aniel H. Cary, salutation street, near Commercial 
street; A. & ■). McLaren, Monmouth, between Marion 
and Brooke streets; W. H. Room, corner Havre and 
Brooks streets. 

PROM THE COMMON COUNCIL. 

Petitions were severally referred in concurrence. 

Report and order directing the Mayor to petition 
the Legislature for a more stringent law regarding 
the manufacture and storage of petroleum; referred 
to the Committ ie on Fire Department. 

Order authorising the expenditure of $1500 by the 
Committee on Public Instruction, in tendering cour- 
tesies to a delegation from the School Committee ot 
Philadelphia. Passed. 

Order authorizing the purchase of a site for a new 
ward room for Ward 1:5. etc- In the reference to the 
next City Council, the Board non-concurred. 

Order authorizing the purchase of a site for a new 
ward room for Ward 14, etc In reference to the next 
City Council, the Board non-concurred. 

ORDERS OP NOTICE RETURNABLE THIS DAY. 

Order of notice on discontinuing a portion of North- 
ampton street, adjoining the land of the Boston Wa- 
ter Power Co. Recommit! id (no objection.) 

Order of notice on discontinuing a portion of 
Mathews street, adjoining the estate of the heirs of 
John P. Thorndike. Recommitted (1.0 objection.) 

Order of notice on widening Harrison avenue on 
its easterly side, at the corner af Dover street. Re- 
committed (no objection.) 

Order of notice on allowing Messrs. Jacobs & Deane 
to erect a stable for more than four horses on Wor- 
cester street, ni ar Columbus avenue. 

The remonstrance of Moses Allen and forty Others 
against the same was presented and read. 

Mr. Savage, Deputy Chief of Police, appeared in 
support of the remonstrance, and stated that the sign- 
ers of that remonstrance were owners of property 
and heads of families in the neighborhood, ten of 
whom were large building contractors in the city, and 
were now building on Columbus avenue, in the im- 
mediate vicinity of the proposed stable. The signers 
of the remonstrance respectfully meant what they had 
there represented, feeling that any addition ofa stable 
would be a nuisance to their homes. He hoped the 
Board would take such measures as to reach a full 
and thorough knowledge of the whole matter. 

The order was recommitted. 

ORDERS OF NOTICE. 

The following orders of notice were passed, several- 
ly returnable November 3, 18(58: 

Order of notice upon the laying out and widening 
of Kendall street, on its southwesterly side. 

Order (if notice upon the widening of Eliot street on 
on its southerly side, at the southwesterly corner of 
Tremont street and Eliot street. 

Order of notice to owners and abutters on Lenox 
street, between Washington street and Shawmnt av- 
enue, to lay their sidewalks with bricks within twenty 
days. 

Order of notice on the petition of the Marginal Freight 
•Railway for location on Haverhill street," (returnable 
November 9.) 

ORDERS TO PAT. 

The following orders to pay certain claims against 
the city were passed : 

Order to pay William s. Cordingloy $404 for damage 
to his estate, .">44 Shawm ut avenue, by raising the 
grade of said avenue. 

Order to pay James p. VOgel $85, in addition to the 
sum heretofore awarded to him, for damages to his es- 
tate, 550 Shawmut avenue, by raising the grade of 
said avenue. 



PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



41 



antry, $253, 



Order to pay Co. C, 1st Regiment of [nfi 
for special duty at Hull. 

UNFINISHED BUSINESS FROM LAST MEETING. 

Order changing assessment of $321 1.5 for sewer on 
Gates streel from Sarah 10. How to Albert J. Wright 
and Henry W. Wilson, trustees. Passed. 

Order directing construction of'a sewer in Warebam 
street. Passed. 

Order directing construction of a --ewer in Tremont 
street, between Benton and Kendall streets. Passed. 

Order to lay out Dartmouth street, between War- 
ren and Columbus avenues. Passed. 

Order to widen Summer street, on estate of Michaej 
H. Gleeson, at an exp ;nso of $4800. Laid on the table. 

REPORTS OF COSIMXTJIEES. 

Alderman Paul, from the Committee on Sewers, re- 
ported mi action necessary upon the petition of E. S. 
Johnson for extension of Lenox street sewer. Accep- 
ted. 

Alderman Cobb, from the joint special committee 
to whom was referred the bonds of certain city « > Hi - 
cers, reported the same to lie found sufficient in a. 
mount, and security. Accepted. 

Alderman Richards, from the Committee on the 
Fire Department, upon instruction to obtain from the 
Board of Engineers of the Fire Department a state- 
m in ofthe number of wooden buildings erected since 
Jan. l-i, 1868, submitted a report covering the report 
of the ( Ihief Engineer- 

The report states the number of wooden buildings 
erected since January 1, l.>68, and now in process of 
erection, exceeding the limits prescribed by statute, 
to bo -ixl 'in in the city proper, twenty-live " in Smith 
Boston, and twenty three in Boston Highlands. II ap- 
pears that no attempt is made t > enforce the law at 
the present time, although the growth ofthe city dur- 
ing th" thirty -three years since the passage of the act 
lade the necessity for its enforcement vastly 
greater. They recommend that the lire engineers be 
requested to give notice that any person or persons 
erecting a wooden building contrary to the provisions 
ofthe statute, will be proc seded against according to 
law. Report laid on the table and ordered to be 
printed. 

Alderman White, from the Committee on Licenses, 
reported in favor of granting licenses to certain vic- 
tuallers and innholdors, exhibitors, auctioneers, news- 
paper sellers, etc Accepted. 

Alderman Messinger, from the CommUtce on 
Health, reported an order to abate sundry nuisances, 
which was passed. 

Alderman Talbot, from the Committee on Streets, 
reported no action necessary upon sundry notices of 
int 'ntion to build presented at the last meeting. 
Report accepted. 

Also no action n scessary on the, order of notice 
up in widening of Kneeland street. 

Alderman Paul, from the Joint Special Committee 
on the Church Str jet District, submitted a report in 
print, in which they state that the work has been 
prosecuted with such energy as now to require an ap- 
propriation in addition to the $200,003 already appro- 
priated, and which was deemed sufficient to cover 
the operations ofthe present year. Instead of require - 
ing two years to complete the work, the raising of 
buildings now under contract (covering three-fourths 
of the whole district) , can be finished by the first of 
February next, with an average amount of good 
weather, and the entire work in the district lie com- 
pleted by the first of August next. The committee re- 
commend the passage of an order appropriating a 
second $200,000 ofthe estimated $650,000, ami also of 
an order increasing the salaries of tin' commissioners 
to $2500 p. r annum from October 1. Orders read once 
and laid over. 

Alderman White, from the Committee to whom was 
referred the petitions of Phineas Pierce and others, 
Robert B. Williams and others, for an improved plan 
of drainage for the houses on Tremont street, Upton 
street, and the vicinity, submitted a detailed report, 
in which they state that the evils suffered by many of 
the occupants of the territory (lying northwest of 
Washington street and between Dover and Spring- 
field streets, including about 130 acres) from the flood- 
ing of their cellars are very serious, greatly depreciat- 
ing the value of the propertv and injuriously affecting 
health. No sufficient remedy can be provided, in the 
opinion 01 the Committee, for many ofthe cellars, at 
tin ir present grade, by any change in or addition to 
the present system of drainage, but the cellars must 
be boxed or abandoned, or the houses raised to a high- 
er gra< le. 



The Committee are of opinion that the present evils 
may be obviated to some extent by raising the dis- 
trict between Dover street and the Worcester Kail- 
road to a sufficiently high grade to drain independ- 
ently to the South Bay, thereby cutting off this dis- 
trict" from the Dover street sewer, and by construct- 
ing above Dedham street another large outlet sewer 
similar to the one in that street. They recommend 
that the whole subject be referred to the Committee 
on sewers, and it was so referred. 

ORDERS PASSED 

Order discontinuing a portion of Northampton 
street, adjoining estate of the Boston Water Power 
Company. 

Order directing the collection of certain assess- 
ments for the abatement of nuisances. 

Order authorizing the Middlesex Railroad Company 
to construct a temporary track to connect their tracks 
with those ofthe Metropolitan Railroad at the corner 
of Haverhill and Causeway streets, to be used while 
Beverly street is obstructed by cleansing the sewer. 

Order widening Green street, between Crescent 
place ami Pitts street, at an expense of §1250. 

Order widening Harrison avenue on its easterly 
side at the corner of Dover street, at an expense of 
$3642. 

( >rder widening Dover street near Harrison avenue, 
at an expense of $13,210. 

Order authorizing the Superintendent of Lamps, 
under the direction ofthe Committee on that Depart- 
ment to expend a sum not exceeding $600 for the pur- 
pose of completing the alterations of lanterns and 
placing street signs therein. 

Order authorizing the Committee on Armories to 
expend a sum not exceeding $900 in fitting up the 
armory building, East Boston.. 

Order requesting the Committee on Licenses to ob- 
tain the opinion of the Boston Society of Architects 
in relation to the construction ofthe building on Tre- 
mont street known as the Skating Kink. 

i >rder authorizing the Auditor of Accounts to Trans. 
fer $1500 from the reserved fund to the appropria- 
tion for the Wells School House(yeas 12, naysO.) 

Order transferring to the appropriation for salaries 
at the Public Library, the appropriation of $1000 for 
pamphlets, contained in the estimate of expenditures 
forthe Public Library during the present financial 
year. 

Order authorizing the Joint Special Committee on 
the Church Streees District, with the approval of His 
Honor the Mayor, to settle and adjust damages forthe 
taking of lands in the Church street District, with the 
former owners thereof, severally, upon such terms 
and conditions as they shall deem expedient, and tore- 
convey the several parcels of land so taken, in making 
such settlements. 

LINCOLN SCHOOLHOUSE YATCD. 

The report inexpedient to enlarge the Lincoln 
Schoolhouse yard was taken from the table on motion 
of Alderman White, and referred to the Committee 
on Public Instruction. 

COUNTY COURT-HOUSE. 

On motion of Alderman Messiuger, the report and 
orders concerning the alteration ofthe Suffolk Court 
House, at an expense of $191,000, were taken from the 
table. 

Alderman Messinger believed that (he members ot 
the Board had all considered the subject fully, and 
that a majority would be opposed to expending nearly 
§200,000, for aii object which was not going to do any 
good, which did not answer the purpose, and was not 
required. 

Alderman Richards preferred that the report, lying 
upon the table, "inexpedient to transfer the criminal 
court- to jail precincts" should be disposed of first, 
before acting upon the question of alterations. The 
alterations were needed, and nearly all whose opinion 
he had heard were in favor of the project. 

Alderman Talbot should have no objection to the 
proposed alterations and enlargements of the Court 
House were it in a place where it was still. The Court 
House should be built in some quiet place, and the 
city should not expend so much so much money upon 
the present building. 

Alderman Paul stated that he inquired of gentlemen 
connected with the Court House, whose duties kept 
them there all the time, in regard to the Improvements 
proposed, and the statement, had been made in reply 
that accommodations had been only lacking for the 
law library, and that, since the change in the Bankrupt 
law there was no use on the part of the state for the 



<£2 



PROCEEDINrrS OF CITY COTJISrCIL. 



Insolvency Court-Room; ;iu<l ii was unnecessary to 
make a large expenditure for this purpose. 

\ Iderman Richards stated that he iia<l had consider- 
able conversation with officers of the Court House, and 
thej acquiesced heartily in proposed changes. The 
principal objection ot the present locality was the pave- 
ment, .'in objection which was now being remedied. 

On n mi inn of A Iderman Ddessinge**, the order was in- 
definitely postponed. Yeas, 9; nays, 3. 

Yens- \Mi rman Braman, Cobb, Fairbanks Messiu- 
ger.Paul, Pratt, Talbot, Whil •. Woodman— 9. 

\a\ - — A M rinaii .lames, Richards, Seaver — 3. 

Alderman Richards tlicn moved to take from the 
table the report inexpedient to tranfer the criminal 
courts to the jail precinct*, and the same was read. 

Alderman Messinger could not coucur in the report. 

The very faci thai the business was much less at 
present than formerly, as stated hj the committee, 
vi a- tii \ erj argument why he should favor removal. 

The effect of the spectacle presented each day, of 
the persons taken to and fr mi the criminal courts or 
the lock-up, was one which had a bad influence, and 
its impropri ty was often menti med by main of onr 
best citizens. On one occasion 1-20 persons were 
brought up from the prison for trial, ami the thing 
was occurin ; every day, and was a stfene to be depre- 
cated and avoided. Th ■ ' ' lief-Tustice of the Criminal 
Court was of opinion that the alteration would involve 
ome inconveni mce, but that it would be desirable 
that some chah ore be made. He moved that the re. 

port hi' i sp 'chilly assigned until three weeks hence. 

Alderman Richards claimed thai if. according t<> 
a stat sment in the l- iport, that it had be m i iconven- 
ient f ir 1 lw vers and witness js at one time whe i hu i- 
nes was b id, it would certainly become much more so 
at present. 

The further consideration of the report was assign- 
ed to Nov. !). 

Adjourned. 



Proceedings of the Common GaiinGil, 



OCT. 9.2, 1868. 



The Common Council met pursuant to adjournment 
o.i"i}i o'clock P. M., the President in the chair. 

FROM THE BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 

P< titiois w-iv severally referred in concurrence. 

Report, leave to withdraw, on petition of Bernard 
O'Kane, to be paid for injuries sustained on account 
oi the wi lening of Tremont street. Accepted in con- 
curreni e. 

Report on bonds of city officers, that the same are 
sufficient in amount and' surety. Accepted in concur- 
renc s. 

Recommitment of report, inexpedient to purchase 
1 md on the westerly side of the Lincoln Sclioolhouse. 
Recommitted in concurrence. 

Resolve and order tor the widening oi' Dover street 
at the corner of Harrison. avenue. Referred, on mo- 
tion of Mr. Train of Ward Three, to the Committee 
on Streets <,n the part of the Common Council. 

order authorizing the Committee on the Chur.-h 
street District to s ttle damages for land taken in 
said district. Laid on the table on motion of Mr. Os- 
born of Ward Six. 

Order to transfer $1000 from the appropriation for 
pamphlets to t ie appropri itii n for salaries at the Pub- 
lic Library. Referred, on motion of Mr. Wadsworth 
of Ward Four, t > the ( oinniitlee on the Public Library. 

Order to transfer $1500 from the Reserved Fuel to 
the appropriation for the Wells Seboolhouse. On mo- 
tion of Mr. iiean of Ward Eleven the order was amend- 
ed by changing the sura to $2200, Mr. Bean < xplaining 
that the extra bills, for extra foundation, slating, brick 
work, iron work, change of trusses, etc., amounted 
very nearly to that sum. The order was afterwards 
passed under a suspension of the rules, (44 to o). 

Report and orders in favor of the erection of a po- 
lice station house and ward room on land in Ward 
Thirteen, ata cost Of$40,000. The Hoard of Aldermen 
having, non-coneurrei.1 in the vote of the Common 



Council to refer the same to the next City Council, it 
was voted, on motion of Mr. Keith of Ward Fifteen, 
that the Council r, a tie from it- former vote, and the 
re | io r i and orders were 1 laid on the table. 

On motion Of Mr Keith the same action was taken 
in regard to tic rep irl in favor oi orders to purchase 
land in Ward Fourteen, at an expense not exceeding 
$3000, for the purpose Of erecting thereon a Ward room 
and house for Hook and Ladder Company No. I. 

UNFINISHED BUSINESS. 

Order s, setting apart land of the city for a hose 
house for Hose Co. No. .'!. on North Grove street : also 
authorizing erection of said Im-e house, at an expense 
in t exceeding $18,000; also authorizing appropriation 
of said amount, to be borrowed by the Treasurer. Or- 
der- passed, (t."> to o). 

Order authorizing the Auditor to transfer $3432 from 
the Reserved Fund to the appropriation for "People's 
Kerry Drops." Order referred, on motion of .Mi-. Train 
of Ward Three, to the Committee on Finance. 

I IIMMfMI At ION. 

A communication was received from His Honor the 
Mayor, transmitting a communication of Tim-, l;. 
Curtis, recommending, in view of the enlargement of 

the city limit-, the choice of.; new source Of Supply 
for water, io meet more especially the wants of Last 
Boston. Referred to the Cochituate Water Board. 

TAKEN FROM THE TABLE. 

Mr. Wadsworth of Ward Four moved to take from 
the table the order for the widening of Matthews street. 

Mr. Bishop of Ward se\ en d 'sired information upon 
the subject of the order. Having visited the locality, 
he was of opinion that the widening was proposed in 
the widest part of the street, and would be of no ben- 
efit to the city. 

Mr. Wadsworth of Ward Four stated that the widen- 
ing extended from Federal street as far as Mr. Snow 
had built his block. He stated that notice had been 
given t i Mr. Snow of the proposed widening, who had 
commenced building, and had built upon that line, 
and the good faith of the city now required that his 
land should bo taken. 

The order was passed. 

On motion of Mr. Train of Ward Three, the report 
in favor of an additional appropriation of $100,000 for 
paving and erading streets was taken from the table 
and referred to the Committee on Finance. 

On motion of .Mr. Lean of Ward Eleven the order 
authorizing the procuring of plans and estimates for 
a building to be erected on Row ker street to accom- 
modate a Horse Hose Company, Hook anil Ladder 
Company No. 1, a Fuel Depot for the Fire Department, 
and an armory for the Lancers, was taken from the 
table. On mi'ti in of Mr. Tucker ol Ward Six the or- 
der was referred to the next City Council. 

ORDER INTRODUCED. 

Mr. Bishop of Ward Seven ottered an order direct- 
ing the Committee on Ordinances to report upon the 
expediency of reporting an ordinance constituting 
eight hours a day's tabor for mechanics and laborers 
in the employ of the city, except in such cases as may 
be detrimental to the interest of the city. 

Mr. Bishop stated that I i is reason for offering the 
order was merely to ascertain if the provision of the 
order could he adopted without injury to the interests 
of the city, understanding that the United states Gov- 
ernment had made a similar provision in regard to its 
employes. 

Mr. .Nelson of Ward Nine, while not opposing the or- 
der, desired to correct the gentleman concerning the 
regulation of the hours of labor by the United stetes 
Govt rument, which was that in the War Department 
all workmen for ( i Jit hours should receive payment 
lor ijjht hours labor, instead of ten. That was the de- 
cision of Secretary Sch >ii -Id. 

Mr. Bishop believed that the opinion of the Secretary 
to that efl'i't had been overruled. 

Tne order was refused a second reading— 13 to 21. 

Adjourned. 



PROCEEmTSTG-S CTF^OITY OOinSTOTE. 



-43 



Proceedings of Board of Aldermen, 

OCT. 26, 1868. 



The Board of Aldermen held their regular weekly 
meclingat 4 o'clock P. M., I lis Honor Mayor Shurtleff 
in the Chair. 

APPOINTMENT. 

John C. Robinson as Constable. 

PETITIONS. 

Petition of George Curtis and others that Franklin 
Winchester he appointed Superintendent ofthe Bridge 
across the Roxbury Canal; referred to the Committee 
on Bridges. 

Petition of Stephen Chamberlin for leave to erect 
two wooden buildings in Ward Twelve; referred to 
Alderman • lames and Braman, to he joined bj the 
Common Council, and a similar petition received last 
week, was referred to the same committee, the former 
vote referring it to the Committee, on Fire Depart- 
ment being reconsidered. 

Petition ofC. C. Potterfor leaveto erects stable 
formnre than four horses on Beverly street; referred 
tn ( lommittee on Health. 

Petition of Boston & Albany Railroad Co. that Chan- 
dler street be graded, &c. ; referred to the Committee 
on Paving. 

Petition of Francis A. Osborn for use of Faneuil 
Hall, Oct. SI, for a political meeting; referred to 
Committee on Faneuil Hall, with full power. 

Petition of Aaron 11. Bean and others for a new 
primary schoolhouse in the Brimmer district ; referred 
to Committee on Public Instruction. 

Petition of Henry Morgan and others, for the use of 
Faneuil Hall, Nov. 26, lor an exhibition ofnewsbovs; 
referred to Committee on Faneuil Hall, with full 
power. 

Petition of Edward Dean and others, tor an exten- 
sion of F street to the Highland District; referred to 
the Committee on Streets. 

Petition of Weston Lewis and others, that Canal 
street from Market street to Causeway street aula 
portion of Travers street be closed to piihlie travel on 
the evening of the 28th, for the purpose of providing 
a collation for Portland delegati m of torchlight Pro- 
cession. (An order was passed directing tire Chief of 
Police to close such street 3 on the 28th and 29th as he 
may deem expedient.) 

Petition to the Legislature of Boston & Lowell 
Railroad Company for discontinuance of streets near 
passenger station in Causeway street, was referred to 
the next City Council. 

INTENTIONS TO BUILD. 

The following notices of intention to build were 
presented and referred to the Committee on streets: 

Of Hawley & Markham, Marginal street, East 
Boston; Downer Kerosene Oil Co. Second street, 
between A and B streets; E. A. Knowlton, 47 Irving 
street; Alfred Hale.v- Co., Third, bet. G and Atlantic 
streets; Boston Skating Rink Association, Tremont 
street, corner of Westfleld street; Daniel I!. Spear.; 
rear of 5 Ashland place; Dean & I'yne, Hunnemau 
street; Union Ship Timber Manufacturing Co., Maver- 
ick, between Lamson and Jeffries stre< I ; P. A. 
Sullivan, Saratoga street, East Boston; C. C. Pettee, 
Berkley street, between Causeway and Travers 
streets; C. K. Kirby, Tremont street, corner of 
Seaver place. 

WIDENING OF HANOVER STREET. 

A hearing took plfice on the order of n< tice for 
the widen in*: of Hanover street. 

Henry A. Whitney appeared in remonstrance, rep- 
resenting the estate upon the corner of Elm and Han- 
over street-, one of the most valuable estates on 
Hanover street, upon which is a large block of build- 
ings. Mr. W. claimed that there was no demand for 
greater width in that portion of Hanover street. 
Judging from the city's plan ofthe street, it would 
seem thatif there were any complaint as to crowding, 
it would be at the upper and narrower end ofthe street 
and if the buildings on that side of the street were to 
be cut off, the desire of those who favor it would be 
accomplished by making the street uniform in that 
portion. The expense of a widening of the street 
here would seem much greater than is usually the 
ease. It was very much to be doubted whether the 
estates would be improved in such a way bv this 



cutting that the b< tterments can be put in as in other 
parts of the city. There seemed to be no necessity 
for the widening. 

.John .1 K lyner, representing in part the estate en 
the lower corner of Elm street, said the damage to 
which by the proposed cutting oil' would be consider- 
able, and it was believed that fie public good required 
no such outlay. This estate was covered with build- 
ings, and the cutting off would take about two-sevenths 
of the whole oi-t ite ; and it would be necessary to take 
the buildings all down anil build entirely new By 
r a son < if the widening of Sudbury and Union streets, 
Hanover street is not now obstructed any more if as 
much, as it WHS war ago. 

Messrs. X. J. Rnss, R. Reed, C.J. Bordeu,— Prager, 
J. B. Judkin, J. S. sweat, Isaac Seabrey, — Bangs, B. 
F. Edmunds and J. M. Beeket appeared and stated 
that in their opinion I' e street was very seldom blocked 
up in this part, and there was no public necessity for 
the widening proposed. 

Messrs. Bancroft, Shaw and Sowden also appeared 
in support ofthe r monstrance. 

'I'he order w as recommitted. 

A heari ig also took place upon the order of notice 
for the widening of Hanover street at the corner of 
Portland street, 

Mr. Becket, a lessee, objected to the widening, iu 
behalf of the owner at d him- 'if, as calculated t > injure 
the estate 03 taking most of it. The buildings being 
old it was believed tb t in a few years through rebuild- 
ing lie expense of w i lening would be less. 

Alderman Talbot -t ited that there would be no ne- 
cessity for this widening at present, if the other widen- 
in? did not take place, and on his motion the order 
was rec nninitl ed. 

HEARING ON OTHER ORDERS OF NOTICE. 

The order for laying out Berkeley street as a public 
highway, no one appearing, it was recommitted, w ith 
instruction to the committee to report an order for the 
laj tng out ofthe street from Providence street to Bea- 
oon street. 

Order of notice relative to a stationary engine on 
Albany street, near Wareliam street, was laid on the 
table.' 

Order of notice for the extension of Allen street to 
Charles street. 

E. D. Sohier appeared in opposition to the exten- 
sion, in behalf of t'i ■ owners of tie find through 

Which it wis propose i tn extend the strei I. They did 
not wish for the extension, de siring to hold the ' land 
for prospective purposes, and believed that the ex- 
pen ses for sidewalks and betterments would be great- 
er than any advanta ?es to b • derived from the exten- 
sion ofth i street. Recommitted. 

Order of notice on the widening of South Cedar 
street. R •eommitt'd (no one appearing). 

Order of notice on laying out Montgomery street. 
Recommit! d (no one appealing). 

Order of notice for the widening of Bedford street, 
by t iking land oflieir- of J.H.Foster. Recommitted (no 
oiie appearing). 

Order of notice for the extension of Broadway from 
Federal street to Albany street. 

Charl -s A. Choate app Mr id for the Old Colony Rail- 
road Comp my, st iting that opposition would be made 
only to a proposition for a crossuig of their road at 
grade. Recommitted. 

Order of notice to the Metropolitan Railroad Com- 
pany, to t ike up a track near Gardner street. 

Counsel for Louis Prang, petitioner, stated that the 
track was not used, and the sidewalk in front of the 
new building put up by him could not lie lai I without 
a removal ofthe track, while the track in ils present 
condition was an injury to his business. 

Win. Cumston, President of the Corporation, slated 
that the track had not been used simply because of 
the building operations. He thought there would he 
no difficulty in maki ig a satisfactory arrangement. 
Recommitted. 

UNFINISHED BUSINESS. 

The orders directing the Superintendent of sewers 
to construct sewer in Broadway, from A to B str at-; 
to construct sewer in London street, from Meridian 
to Decatur streets; to construct sewer in Cedar and 
Highland Streets, and in Highland street, between 
D na- street and Fort avenue, were severally passed. 

The rep >rt ami orders for additional appropriation 
of $200,00(1 for Church Street District were considered. 

The proposed appropriation is not for oxpendi- 
tur ss beyond the estlmat is, but in anticipation of the 
completion of the work, which has been carried on 
rnoiM expeditiously then was expected. 



44r 



PHOCEEDINQS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



kins: the additional appropriation was 
1 1, and the order providing for compensation to 
the ( unmissioners \\ a • I lid on the i tule. 

rON I "I NCIL PAPERS. 

itlonsvt re severallj referred in concuirenoe. 
Or lei Cor additional appropriation for Wells School- 
, was pa s ''1 as amended, in concurr it) 

rcncc t> next City Council of subject of 
house No. I, and an arm rj in Bowker street, 
wii - n » -concurred in. 
Orders were passed, In concurrence, for a hose 
en. No. .'!, and for an appropriation of 
i ther3for, a i<l reference t) Cnnmittea on Li- 
brary of the order making a transfer i i salaries in that 
, at. 
order was reported and passed on the com- 
munication of the Auditor, transferring $3432 from 
the Rest rved Fund to the appropri iti »n for ferries. 

REPORTS OF COMMITTEES. 

Alderman Messinger.from the Committee on Fi- 
i ■ i ■■ de a report on the subject of an additional 

appropriation for paving. The committ3e conclude 
with an order, providi ig for the trausfer of $50,000 
from the apropriationfor the Soldiers' and Sailors' 
Monument, $13,000 from the appropriation for the 
Comm in, and $12,000 from the appropriation for Al- 
banj street grading. 

Alderman Paul moved to amend by adding $25,000 
from i'«i' appropriation for Hark Hay and surface 
drainage, since that work could not be prosecuted 
mn h farther this season, and in defence of the call 
for a further appropriation, said he did not doubt, 
had a further sum of $100,000 been asked for at the 
begi ining of the season, it would have been granted. 
An i uT sase had been required by the annexation of 
Roxbnry, and when the work was done which was 
required there, but little more would be needed for 
It was wanted, also, on new streets on the 
Back Bay wh re millions of dollars had been expend- 
ed in improvements, and without which expendi- 
tures citiizene would not feel much encouraged to 
make such improvements. Some of these streets were 
now in a eondition which was a disgrace tothecity, 
and he doubted not, that although not accepted, the. 
eitymitthl be held for damages in some cases on ac- 
count of their condition The city ought to be expect- 
ed t ) keep up with privat i enti rprise. 

Alderman Messinger expressed his willingness to 
concur in fie proposed additional appropriation, af- 
t. r the explanati >n of Alderman Paid. 
■ The amendment was adopted, and the order as 
aim nded, was passed. 

Vldcrman Talbot, from the Committee on streets, 
rep irted no action necessary on certain notices of in- 
tent! ill t > build. 

Alderman White, from the Committee on Licenses, 
a report favorable on certain licenses named, 
and for the transfer of others. 

sk \tini; RINK. 

Alderman Whits also made a report on the sub- 
ject of the order for an examination of the building 
know n as the Skating Rink. 

The r 'port was accompanied by a report of an ex- 
amination by N. Henry Crafts, City Engineer,and by 
a committee of the Society of Architects. Mr. Craft's 
stal s that he found the condition of the bidding in 
several respects to be such as to render it necessary 
either to strengthen it in its ..present eondition or to 
' it down and rebuild it. The foundations were 
built \ cry loosely of Itoxbury st me, nearly dry in the 
centre, the timber sills which support the intermediate 
wall ■ i re faulty in construction, the buttresses in many 
cases ar i pressed out at the top, the arches which sup- 
port the roof are in several instances distorted and 
i d out of shape, and in that portion of the wall 

which has fallen the adhesion of the mortar to the 
bri ks is very imperfect, n was notpossible todcter- 
mi H whether the requisite number of piles were 
driv a', or were driven to a firm bedding. In vi sw of 
bii i , he is of the opinion, confirmed by that of a 

ittee of the Society of Architects, that it is im- 
practible to so repair and strengthen the building as 
to make it absolutelj 3afe; and the proprietors have 
plai ■ l iii ■ whole matter in the hands of a competent 
ar ihitect and engineer, who have prep ired plans for 
rebuilding the v lole structure iu a very substantial 
manner. The following is a memorandum of what is 
prop ' ed : 

I . i he rear portion of the building to be rebuilt in 
accordance with the plans prepared for the purpose 
by Win. (j. Preston, architect, to rest on 1(>|J addition- 
al piles. 



■>. The roofto be reconstructed in accordance with 
the plans presented by Clemens Herschell, civil engi- 
neer. 

3. All the Etoxbury stone foundations under the 
whole building to be 'aken out and replaced by a wall 
ol Quincy black granite, laid in cement. 

4. The entire brick Walls to lie taken down and re- 
built of a proper thickness in clear cement. 

r>. Buttresses of increased size to be constructed at 
each truss pier, laid in cement. 

6. The Tremont street front to be built of face brick, 
with entrances of increased size. 

7. The present piling to be tested, and if unsatis- 
factory, additional piles to be driven to a solid clay 
bottom. 

The Engineer says in conclusion, "Having -ecu the 
plans proposed by the arcbitei t and engineer, I have 
no hesitation in saying that if the building is rebuilt 
in a faithful manner, according to these plans, it will 
be perfectly safe and secure, and one in which the 
public may have entire confidence." 

The report was laid on the table and ordered to be 
l rinted. 

SOUTH BOSTON STREETS. 

City Document No. 118 was taken up, it being the 
boundary line of the several streets in South Boston, 
as determined by the Commissioners of 1867, an I 
made under the direction of the City Engineer. Oi 
this an order of notice was issued to all parties in- 
terest id, Cor a hearing on the 9th of November, for any 
objections which may be made to laying out the -aid 
streets according to the described boundary lines. 

ORDERS PASSED. 

Order to widen South Cedar street, by taking land 
of the city and of Mary Eliza Bird, on that street, ami 
on South Cedar place and Edgerly place, at an ex- 
panse of $35,000. 

Order to lay out Berkeley street as a public high- 
way from Clareudon street to the land of the Boston 
& Providence Railroad Co. 

Order to lay out Apple ton street, between Claren- 
don street and Columbus avenue. 

Order to pay Albert Brown $1250 lor land taken and 
damages in widening Green street. 

Order to pay bills of certain members of the City 
Government. 

Order of notice to quit to Wm. Pray and others, on 
the line of widening Of Dorchester street, under an or- 
der of 15th of July, 1867. 

A report was made of estimates for extension of 
Brimmer street, and an order was passed for assess- 
m ait of betterments on estates in the vicinity. 

Adjourned to Tuesday, November 3. 



Proceedings of the Common Council, 



OCT. 29, 1868. 



The regular weekly meeting of the Common Coun- 
cil was held this evening, Charles II. Allen, the Presi- 
dent, in the chair. Some delay was occasioned in ob- 
taining members sufficient for a quorum. 
PETITION. 

Petition of K. Maria Simonds, for compensation in 
performing the services of Usher in a grammar school ; 
referred to the Committee on Claims. 

PAPERS FROM THE BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 

The petition of Charles F. Coffin for leave to erect 
wooden buildings at South Boston came up on concur- 
rence with the Board of Aldermen, to refer it to a 
sp jcial i ommittee. 

.Mr. Wadsworth of Ward Four moved that theCoun- 
Cil non-concur. 

Mr. Wilson of Ward Twelve said he understood the 
reason of reference to a special committee was that 
Alderman James, who was familiar witli the matt r, 
an 1 residing in that section, w ould see that no injus- 
tice was done either to the city or to the petitioner. 
It was objectionable to make a change which would 
cause a delay, on account oi the lateness of the season. 



PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



4~> 



Mr. Wadsworth did not think it desirable to encour- 
age violations of the city ordinances. The gentleman 
bought the land of the city, knowing the ordinance; 
and if so he should put up his buildings in accordance 
willi the statute. It was not desirable to encourage 
such erections, for the reason also that it would injure 
other hinds of the city. 

Mr. Wilson replied that the buildings immediately 
around this hind were all of wood, and in violation of 
the statute. The buildings were of a good class, and 
the gentleman w [shed to put up buildings which were 
required by the wants of the times. The proposed 
erection would carry the buildings two feet higher 
than allowed b\ the'ordinaiicc. 

Mr. Train of Ward Three said he always distrusted 
the attempts to refer matters to special committees, 
by taking them from appropriate standing commit- 
tees, as indicating improper designs, and should op- 
pose such reference unless good reasons were given 
for the action. 

The motion to non-concur was carried. 

The petition of Stephen Chamberlain, for leave to 
erect two wooden buildings ai south Boston, being of 
tint same charact tr, was disposed of in the same w ay, 
by referring it to the Committee on the Fire Depart- 
ment. 

The order to pay bills of November draft was passed 
in concurrence. 

The resolve and order for laying out and widening 
South Cedar Street being under consideration, 

Mr. Wadsworth of Ward Four, thought it important 
that when such projects were brought before the < !oun- 
cil, the plans for widening should he presented, that 
the members may Know for what they are voting. 
Several plans for widening that streel having been un- 
der consideration, he did not know what amount of 
Widening was required. For that reason, he moved 
to lay the subject on the table. Lost. 

A motion was made that the subject be referred to 
the Committee on streets. 

Donbt being expressed as to the extent of the widen- 
ing, after further remarks by Mr. Wadsworth the ref- 
erence was carried. 

Tne non-concurrence in referring to the next City 
Council of the order authorizing the procuring of 
plans and estimates for a building, to he erected in 
Bowker street, to accommodate Engine Company No. 
-1 a Horse Hose Company. Hook ami Ladder No". 1, a 
Fuel Depot for the Fire Department, and an Armory 
for the Lancers, come up, the question being on ad- 
heariug to the non-concurrence. 

A motion was made that the Council recede from 
its former action. 

The motion t > recede was carried, when the ques- 
tion recurring upon the passage of the order in con- 
currence, the order was rejected. 

Mr. snow of Ward Eleven moved a reconsidera- 
tion ol this vote, which was lost 

The report and order in favor of an additional ap- 
propriation of $100,006 for the paving department, 
were considered. 

Mr. Train of Ward Three moved to strike out from 
the order the transfer of $25,000 from the appropria- 
tion for Back Kay and surface drainage, leaving the 
order as it came from the Committee on Finance. To 
take this sum would be substantially to make a new 
appropriation, for this drainage appropriation must 
be provided for another season, if not this year. He 
agreed with the report of the Committee, that depart- 
ments should he kept within the appropriations as 
provided for early in the financial year, as the only 
safe way of keeping the city out of heavy debt. The 
money asked for could not lie expended this year, and 
he did not wish to pass the order simply to gratify 
the chairman of the Committee on Paving. The ex- 
penditures of the city had already been too large, 
and it was time to look at the subject carefully, and see 
where we are going to. The debt had been largely 
increased, and no increase should be made, unless 
provision was first made to meet: such an increase. 
The motion to strike out was carried, and the order 
was read once and laid over. 

The order for an additional appropriation of $200,- 
000 for the Church street District was read once. 

The report and order in favorofa transfer of $343*2 
from the "Reserved Fund" to the appropriation for 
"People's Ferry Drops,'' was read and laid over to 
the next meeting. 

REPORTS OF COMMITTEES. 

Mr. Belknap of Ward Three, from the joint stand- 
ing committee on the Public Library, to whom was 
referred the order to transfer the appropriation of 
$1000 for pamphlets to the appropriation for salaries 



at the Public Library, reported that the order ought 
to pass. 

The report of the committee was accepted and the 
order was passed. 

The report and order in favor of allowing the trus- 
tees of the Twelfth Baptist Church to make an exten- 
siim in the rear of the pulpit of their church edifice, 
was taken from the table, on motion of Mr. Snow of 
Ward Eleven. 

The order was discussed at some length, on the ex- 
tent of the obstruction which such an "extension'' 
might make upon the yard of the Phillips Schoolhouse 
and of the possible abridgement of light and air which 
might result from it. 

Messrs. Snow of Ward Eleven and Osborn of Ward 
six did not think that there could arise any harm from 
it, while Messrs. Wadsworth of Ward Four, Train Of 
Ward Three, and Harris of Ward Eleven, doubted 
the policy of doing anything which might bo of dis- 
advantage to the school yard or to the house. 

The question was also' raised whether it might not 
he necessary for the city at some time to purchase 
I his church to enlarge the schoolhouse yard, and Mr. 
Harris disclaimed any wish to injure the Society in- 
terested in this matter, his sympathies being partic- 
ularly in its favor. 

While the subject was under consideration, it being 
ascertained that there was no quorum present, the 
< 'ounc.il 

Adjourned. 



Proceedings of Board of Aldermen, 



./V<9F. S, 1868. 



The Board of Aldermen held their regular weekly 
meeting at 4 o'clock P. M., His Honor Mayor Sluirtleil' 
in the chair. 

PETITIONS. 

Petition of J. P. Ptitman and other-, that Common- 
wealth avenue, from Berkeley to Clarendon street, 
be accepted; of Louis and Bosa Prang, that the line 
of Washington street near Gardiner street be defined; 
ol Esther A. McCutcheon, for apportionment into 
three parts of assessment of betterments on Bowker 
street [see orders]; ot William H. Hill, for license to 
purchase the estate of the city next to 120 Washington 
street ; severally referred to the Committee on streets. 

Petition of Hobbs & Prescott for leave to build a 
stable for more than four horses on West Brookline 
street; referred to the Committee on Health. 

Petition of Cornelius Donovan, Joanna Donovan, 

Timothy F. II igerty. Ellen Hayes and Braddock 
Loring for damages to their several estates on Castle, 
Middlesex and'vfilage streets, onoccountof imper- 
fect drainage: referred to the Committee on Claims. 

Petition of Oliver W. Holmes and others that rails 
of the Metropolitan Railroad belaid in Charles street ; 
of Metropolitan Railroad Co., for extension of loca- 
tion in Tremont street and in Dudley street; of 
Jairus Pratt and wife, to be compensated for damages 
caused by change of grade in Eutaw street. Severally 
referred to the Committee on Paving. 

INTENTIONS TO BUILD. 

The following notices of intentions to build were 
presented and severally referred to the Committee 
on Streets : 

Of Chauncy Page, First street, between 1) and E 
streets; Benjaman H. Flanders, Kneeland street, 
opposite Kneeland place; William II. Quigley, 19 
Peach streel ; Adams & BarstOW, Tremont street, Op- 
posite Common street ; G. W. Meserve, 609 Washing- 
ton street, opposite Olympic Theatre ; Barlow Broth- 
ers, Broadway, between I) and K streets; I. & 11. M. 
Harmon, Newbury, between Berkeley and Clarendon 
streets; I. & H. M. Harmon, Marlborough, between 
Arlington ami Berkeley streets: Frank Hanscom, 
Silver street, between D and F street-, s..iiih 
Boston ; Nathan Wheeler, Milford street : Wm. Waters, 
Jr., White, between Marion and Brooks streets; 
Horace B. Butler, White, between Marion and Brooks 



46 



PROCEF.DIXOS OF CITY COUNCII, 



streets; B. F. Prescott, 217 to 233 Tremonl street, 

Hc-bbs .V Prescott, north side Brookline street, 

between Bhawmnl avenue and Tremont street; 
Leonard Pickering, Brewer sti'ect. 

I ROM I in: MAVoii. 
A message was received from His Honor the 
Mayor calling attention to the subject of laying 
out and accepting a portion of the Milldam Road 
within the limn- of the city at an earl] da; 
thai the citizens may have as soon as possible the 
benefits of a free highway over >:i ii 1 road, and re- 
questing early consideration. Referred to the 
Committee on Streets. 

FROM TIIK COMMON COUNCIL. 

Papers from the Common Council were severally 
disposed of in concurrence, with the exception of 
the piitions of Stephen Chamberlin and of Chas. 
P. Coffin, for leave to erecl wooden buildings in 
Ward Twelve. The Council having voted to refer 
the sinn- to the Joint Commits n Fire Depart- 
ment, instead of Joint special Committee, the 
Board voted to adhere to their original reference. 

ORDER OF NOTICE RETURNABLE. 

Order of notice on the proposed widening of Suf- 
folk street by taking a parrel of land belonging to 
the German Catholic Church. Rsv. E. A. Rider. 
B. Wiechert and Lorenzo Matt appeared in remon- 
strance. Recommitted. 

Appointments. 

The Mayor nominated for duty, at 25 Eliot street, 
Benj. S. Reeder, without pay. Confirmed. 

For Constables — C. S. Blood, and John C. Hairing. 
ton, Jr. Confirmed. 

For Weighers of Coal — Samuel Hosea, Jr., and Al- 
gernon A. Curtis. Confirmed. 

ADMISSIONS TO FIRE DEPARTMENT. 
The following named per-ons were admitted as 
members of the Fire Department, on the recommen- 
dation of the Chief Engineer, viz: Joseph H. Rarrkin, 
Engine Co. Xo. 7, James Edward- ami George F. 
Griffin, each to Hook and Ladder Co. Xo. 1. 

ORDER OF NOTICE. 

Order of notice on laying out of Berkeley street, 
not less thai: sixty feet nor more than eightv feet 
from Providence to Beacon streets, (November 16 ) 
Passed. 

Order of notice on the laying out of Warren 
avenue from Berkeley to Clarendon streets, at a 
width of s'O feet. (November 10.) Passed. 

QUARTERLY REPORTS. 

The Overseer of the Poor submitted the follow- 
ing statement of receipts and expenditures for the 
quarter ending Oct. 31, 1S6S, as follows: 

Receipts : 

Cash on band Aug. 1, 1SGS s:i,050 so 

Drafts on City Treasurer 10,000 no 

Cash from cities and towns 558 50 

Cash from Statu of Massachusetts 5,802 40 

$19,411 79 

Expenditures : 

Amount paid for burials 87>2 87 

" " citi ■- and towns for relief of 

Boston poor 89 50 

Amount paid for expenses of City Temporary 

Home " -.'his 44 

Amountpaid for pensions and grants at office 3153 50 
" " " immediate relief of persons 

having no settlements 180 on 

Amount paid for coal 

" " '• groceries 266100 

" " " salary of secretary 500 00 

" " " " '• bookeeper .'S7."> 00 

" " " salaries of clerks 137 50 

" '• " " " visitors lino on 

" " " office expenses 75 70 

" " " transportation 27 78 

'• " " account of town of Woburn 

(to be refunded) id 7.". 

Amount paid for account of total expenditure 10,956 04 
." " Citj Treasurer, received from 

the state....' 5,802 40 

Cash balance Oct. 31, 1868 2,653 35 

si!.,m 70 



The Superintendent of the Faneull Hall Market 
submitted the following report for the quarter 
ending Oct. SI, 1868: 

i a-h received from rent for -tall- $10,366 50 

Cash received from rent of cellars 5,280 60 

Cash received for parmancnt outside 

-land- 498 7."> 

Fee- received for weighing at Market 

Scale no 75 

(ash received for rent of -tails in new- 
Market :;,o:50 oo 

Cash received for rent of cellars in new- 
Market 1,102 511 

$20,698 5o 
Cash paid to City Treasurer as per re- 
ceipt .' - . 

The City Registrar reported having issued 1005 
certificates of intention of marriage, and having 
received s502 50, pail into the city treasury. 

The reports were severally read and Bent down 
for concurrence. 

RESOLVES AND ORDERS LAYING OUT AND WIDEN- 
ING STREETS. 

Resolve ami order laying out \Ve-t Canton 
street between Warren avenue and Appleton 
.~ireet. (no expense.) Passed. 

Resolve and order widening Moon street, taking 
a parcel of land belonging to Mary Walsh, wife of 
Peter VValch, at an expense of $250. Recommitted. 

Resolve and order widening Bedford street, taking 
a parcel of land belonging t> the heirs of JamesH. 
Foster, at an expense of $4680. Passed. 

Resolve and order widening Eliot street, taking 
a parcel of land belonging to the heir- of Jonathan 
Patten, atan expense of $15,000. Passed. 

ORDER APPORTIONING BETTERMENTS. 

Order apportioning expense of widening Bowker 
street into three equal parts, to he added to annual 
taxes of said estates as follows ; Esther Ann McCuten- 
eon and wife of James McCutcheon, each $212 07; 
interest on second part, $12 76; interest on third part, 
$25 52. Passed. 

ORDERS TO PAY. 

Order- to pay David Snow $S012, for land taken 
and damages occasioned by the widening of Matthews 

street Passed. 

( irder to pay the heirs of Samuel Topliu" on Oliver 
street, s:;.;i4 89 for land taken and damages occasioned 
by the widening and grading of Oliver street — $278367 
Of the amount being the sum awarded by an estimate 
of the Mayor and Aldermen Oct. 0, 1865, anil the 
balance, $531 22 being the interest at o per cent on 
the -urn awarded from the lime the land was taken 
(Sep. o, 1865) to Nov. in, is;s. Passed. 

Order to pay Mary Walch. wife of Peter Waleh, 
$250 for land taken and damage occasioned by the 
widening of Moon street. Passed. 

Order to pay Joseph Hara $318, for damage done 
to hi.- estate- 523 Shaw unit avenue, by raising grade of 
-ail avenue and Ruggles street Passed. 

UNFINISHED BUSINESS. 

;; (solve ami order laying out and widening Tenny- 
son street, at an expense of $1800. Passed. 
TAKEN FROM THE TABLE. 

Resolve and order laying out and widening Berlin 
street, at an expense of $30,000. Passed, 9 t i :;. 

Petition of William Somers. Referred to the Com- 
mittee on steam Engines. 

Report Of the C rcnmittee on Licenses on the condi- 
tion of the Skating liink. Report accepted. 

REPORTS OF COMMITTEES. 

Alderman 'White, from the Committee on Licenses, 
reported in favor of sundry wagon license-, billiard 
table licenses, intelligence office licenses, leave to ex- 
hibit, leave lo deal in .second hand articles, news boys 
licenses, etc. Report accepted. 

Alderman Cobb, from the Committee on Claims, 
reported leave to withdraw on petition of A. L. I)e lii- 
bas for compensation for injuries. Report accepted. 

Also leave to withdraw on petition of Micab Dyer. 
Jr., for compensation for injuries received. Report 
accepted. 

Alderman Messinger, from the Committee on Health, 
reported in favor of granting the petition ofC. C. Pot- 
ter for leave to erect a stable for more than four horses 
on Beverly street Report accepted. 

Also leave to withdraw on petition of Jacobs & 
Deane. Report accepted. 



PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COTJTTOlXi. 



4,7 



Alderman Talbot, from the Committee on Streets, 
reported no action necessary on sundry intentions to 
bnild presented at the last meeting. Report accepted. 

Alderman Messinger, from the Committee on 
Health, reported an order to abate sundry nuisances. 
Report accepted and order passed. 
ORDERS PASSED. 

Order authorizing the .Mayor and the Committee on 
the Paving Department to receive and entertain the 
Mayor and representatives of the City Government 
of Philadelphia, during their visit lo this city on ofli- 
cial business, the expense of the same to be charged 
to the appropriation for the Paving Department 

Order authorizing the building of a block of privies 
of the Austin Primary schoolhouse, and to grade and 
fence said yard, the expense thereof to be charged to 
the appropriation for Primary schools, Public Build- 
ings. 

Order requesting the Mayor to petition the next 
legislature in behalf of the City Council of Boston for 
the passage of an act to provide against the erection 
ofunsafe buildings in the city of Boston. 

Alderman Talbot moved that when the Board ad- 
journ it be to Friday next, at 12 M., and that two 
Aldermen be appointed to examine the returns of votes 
cast this day, and Aldermen Talbot and Fairbanks 
were appointed. Adjourned. 



Proceedings of the Common Council, 



NOV. 5, 1868. 



The regular weekly meeting of the. Common Council 
was held this evening, the President, Chas. H. Allen, 
in the chair. 

PAPERS FROM THE BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 

The quarterly reports of the City Registrar anil of 
the Overseers of the Poor, were ordered to be placed 
on fife. 

Petitions from the Board of Aldermen were referred 
in concurrence. 

Report, l°.ave to withdraw, on petition of A. L. 
DeRibas to lie paid for injuries receieved from a police 
officer, and Report, leave to withdraw, on petition of 
Micah Dyer, Jr., to be paid for injuries to his horse 
from a defect in Norfolk avenue, were severally ac- 
cented in concurrence. 

The resolve and order for widening Flint street, 
and resolve and order for laying out and widening 
Berlin street, were severally referred to the Com- 
mittee on Streets on the part of the Common Coun- 
cil. 

The order requesting the Mayor to petition the 
Legislature for the passage of an act to prohibit the 
erection of unsafe buildings in Boston, was passed 
in ci incurrence. 

The order authorizing; the Committee on Public 
Buildings to grade and fence the yard of the Austin 
Schoolhouse, and to build a block of privies in said 
yard, was read once and referred to the Committee 
on Public Instruction on the part of the Common 
Council. 

The adherence by the Board of Aldermen to its 
votes, referring to a special committee the petition of 
Charles F. Collin for leave to erect wooden buildings 
in Ward Twelve, came up, the question being, Shall 
the Council recede from its amendment, referring it 
to the Committee on the Fire Department. 

Mr. Wadsworth of Ward Four hoped the Council 
would adhere to its former vote. 

The Council refused to recede. 

The same question came up on receding from the 
former vote relative to the petition of Stephen Cham- 
berlain. 

Mr. Wadsworth said, as this question was the same 
as the other, the Council should also adhere in this 
-case. 

The Council refused to recede. 



UNFINISHED BUSINESS. 

The report and order in favor of an additional 
appropriation of $75,000 for the paving department 
was passed — yeas 4.'!, nays none. 

'flu- order for an additional appropriation of $200,000 
for the Church Street District was considered. 

Mr. Bishop of Ward Seven raised an inquiry in 
relation to this appropriation, to which the president 
replied that it was simply to pay over another portion 
of the money which the Council bad decided to ap- 
propriate for raising the Church Street District. 

The order was passed by an unanimous vote, 43 
members voting in the affirmative and none in the 
negative. 

The report and order in favor of a transfer of $3432 
from the "Reserved Fund" to the appropriation for 
"People's Ferry Drops" being under consideration, 
inquiries were made as to the occasion for such an 
appropriation. 

It was stated, in answer to these inquiries, that the 
amount was required to satisfy an execution issued 
by the Supreme Court in favor.of John C. Nichols, for 
damages by injuries to his- property adjoining, and 
and there being no further appropriations applicable 
to ferries, this transfer was called for. The order 
was passed. The report and order in favor of allow- 
ing the Trustees of the Twelfth Baptist Church to 
make an extension in the rear of the pulpit of their 
church edifice was again taken up. 

Mr. Jenks of Ward Three said the church once owned 
the land, which they sold to the city for a high price; 
if they needed it, they should have kept \i, — and he 
hoped the order would never pass. 

Mr. Wadsworth of Ward Four described the situa- 
tion of the schoolhouse and church, and made a state- 
ment of the terms of the purchase, when a bond was 
obtained with a view to the removal of the church, 
and making the schoolhouse yard larger; this bond 
had been allowed to expire, when the request was 
made to be allowed to make the extension proposed. 

No individual, under the circumstances, would allow 
a bay window to be placed over his own property, 
and we ought not to be expected to do what individ- 
uals would not. In view of the purchase of this 
church at no distant period, this should not be per- 
mitted. This land was purchased for the purpose 
of extending the schoohouse yard, and the church 
must be got rid offer the benefit of the schoolhouse. 
If this projection is once allowed, no City Council 
would require its removal, anil it would consequently 
become a permanent fixture. In his judgment the 
members should vote against the order. Mr. Wads- 
worth expressed some surprise that such a measure 
should receive the approval of the Committee on In- 
struction. 

Mt. Snow of Ward Eleven, in behalf of the Commit- 
tee, stated some of the reasons for the action of the 
Committee. The extension was like a bay window, 
but without lights. It would be twenty feet from the 
sidewalk, extending upward eighteen feet. In the 
winter, when the light woidd be desirable, the sun 
does not reach far enough round to be affected by it, 
and in summer, the school will be dismissed before 
the sun is obstructed, and the sunlight will not be re- 
quired. The. church requires more room fur the pres- 
ent, and it is believed that at some time the house \\ ill 
be removed. It was not deemed objectionable by the 
Committee. 

Mr. Jenks of Ward Three expressed surprise at the 
report of the committee. If the society was increas- 
ing, the usual course is to build where 'more room can 
be had : if the socii ty is poor, he would sooner con- 
tribute to aid it, rather than to obstruct the light ami 
air of the school. 

The order was rejected— IS to 2."). 

PETITION. 

Petition of Thos. D. Paine, for payment for injuries 
sustained by alleged defect in Orleans street. Re- 
ferred to Committee on Claims. 

REPORTS OF COMMITTEES. 

Pay a/ t!n' Police. Mr. Squires of Ward Eight, from 
the Committee on Police of the Common Council, to 
whom was referred the order in relation to an increase 
ofthe pay of members of the police force, made a re- 
port, in which they give a comparison of the prices 




4« 



■prjocF.F.DTTsros of city council. 



paj $997 64 per annum, Inolading allowance for uni- 
forms. 

The present pay of the Boston patrolmen is $3 per 
day, or $1095 per annum, about $100 more than the av- 
erage in other cities. 

The rules and regulations for the government ofthe 
Boston Police force are as liberal in regard to allow- 
ances i" officers during absence from dntj on account 
of sickness or disability contracted In the Ben ice, as 
those of any police organization, and any special 
injury to an officer's uniform, received while in the 
discharge of his duly, is repaired at the city's expense. 
The general feeling that the members ofthe police 
department are well paid is shown in the fact that 
there are on file in the Mayor's office at the present 
time about 775 petitions for appointment. In view of 
the foregoing, the committee respectfully report that 
in there opinion it would be inexpedient to increase 
the pay of the members of the police force at this 
time. 

The report was accepted. 

Mi*. Bisnop of Ward Seven moved as a substitute 
for the report, an order for the payment of the police 
the sum of $1200 a year. 

Mr. Train of Ward Three raised a question oforder, 
that the motion could not lie entertained, the report 
ofthe Committee having been accepted. 

The Chair decided that the point oforder was well 
taken, and the motion was ruled out. 

At a subsequent stage of the proceedings of the 
Council, Mr. Bishop offered the same proposition for 
increase of pay of the police force. 

In advocacy ofthe order, Mr. BIsbop urged the cost 
of living as demanding an increase ol pay. The ar- 
gument that there were many applicants for appoint- 
ment he did not consider to be Of much account, as it 
was true in almost all departments of business. An 
increase should take place to secure the best class Of 
men, for no position was more important. In regard 
to clothing, it was only in extreme cases that pay was 
received for injuries accurring thereto. The police, 
as at present paid, receive less compensation than the 
best class of mechanics. 

Mr. Wadsworth moved an indefinite postponement 
of the order, for the reason that an expression of opin- 
ion had already been given by the Council. 

The yeas and nays were Ordered on the motion. 

A motion was made to amend, by laying the order 
on the table. The motion for the yeas and nays on 
tliis question was carried, and the Council refused to 
lay the order on the table. 

Mr. Dennv of Ward Ten moved the previous ques- 
tion, which was carried, by n vote of 41 to <;. 

The question recurring on the indefinite postpone- 
ment of the order, it was carried, by a vote of 29 to 12. 

-Mr. Parker of Ward 14, from the Committee on 
Streets, submitted the report of that committee On the 
order for the widening of Dover street, the report 
Stating that it was the design t^> widen the street from 
forty-one feet to sixty feet, by taking land ofthe city, 
at an expense of $18,210. They conclude that the or- 
der ought to pass. It was accordingly passed, as ree- 
ommended. 

The same committee reported that the order for the 
widening of South Cedar street ought to pass. The 
committee state that the widening is not as proposed 
by the Board of Aldermen some time since, and is 
satsfactorv to all parties. The cost will be $3.5,050. 
'file report was accepted and the order was passed. 

The same committee also reported an order request- 
ing the Mayor to petition the Legislature for authority 
to lav out and construct a street across the South Bay, 
at or near Pine Island, to Washington Village. Ac- 
cepted and order passed. 

On motion of Mr. Hobbs of Ward Fourteen, the or- 
ders to purchase land in Ward Fourteen, at an ex- 
pense not exceeding $8000, for the purpose of erect 
inn- thereon a ward-room and house for Book and 
Ladder c<>. No. 4, and authorizing a loan of said sum 
to be appropriated for the same, were taken from the 

table. 

Mr. Hobbs moved to amend, by providing that the 

location ofthe ward-room and hook and ladder house 
shall be at the junction of Warren street and Dudley 
street and gave as reasons therefor, that it was the 
most suitable place, and would be best for the public 
interests. 

Mr. Pickering of Ward Fourteen advocated the a- 
inenduienl as the most fitting location, and as having 
the approval ofthe Engineers ofthe Fire Department. 
For a ward-room, it would be agreed thai it was the 
best location to accommodate those on their way to 
their business. 

"Mr. Wells of Ward Three said the committee were 



unanimous, save one. that the upper lot was the mot 
suitable one. 

Mr. Kingsbury of Ward Fifteen opposed the amend- 
ment, and said that two of the Engineers in that vi- 
cinity were in favor of the lot on Washington street 

a- preferable. 

Mr. Hobbs said lie had the u ritlen opinion of three 
assistant engineers, indorsed bj the < hief Engineer, 
in favor of the location proposed by him. and a- to the 
room, the street w as wider there than on the place 
proposed in the Original order. 

Mr. Wilson of Ward Twelve advocated the amend- 
ment, on the ground thai the ward-room by the orig- 
inal order would be earned to the extreme point of 
the ward. 

Mr Kingsbury further opposed the amendment, 
and moved the yeas and Days on it- adoption, which 
\va- lost. 

The amendment was carried, and the order was re- 
ferred to the Committee on the Fire Department. 

The order authorizing the Committee on the ( 'huivh 
Street District to settle damages for lands taken in 
said district was taken from the table. 

Mr. Osborn of Ward six offered the following pro- 
viso : 

Provided, That on fixing the price at which such 
parcels shall be reconvcyed, there shall be added to 
the price at which they were taken from the city of 
Boston one-half of the increased value gained by the 
raising Of the grade ofthe Church street territory, 
such increase of value to be estimated by the Board 
of Aldermen. 

Mr. Osborn stated, in explanation of the amend- 
ment, that he wished to apply the betterment law to 
the Church Street District. When the question was 
up before, he opposed the reconveyance of the prop- 
erty to the former owners, but unsuccessfully, yet he 
was of opinion that many members ofthe City Coun- 
cil had changed their minds on the subject, ami hoped 
Ihis measure would pass. After reciting the principal 
events in the drainage of this territory, he claimed 
that the property owners failing to obtain their remedy 
where they should have done, should be held to pay 
apart of the expense of abating the nuisance. The 
committee subsequently found that they were ham- 
pered uniler the order to reconvey the" property to 
the owners, which was likely to cause considerable, 
trouble, and it was rescinded. If the City Govern- 
ment had felt itself under an obligation to reconvey 
that property to the original owners, they would not 
have rescinded the order. Under the circumstances 
it was right that the city should take and hold the 
property. Believing, however, that it is not possible 
to carry out his views, he had offered the order to 
provide that the owners ofthe property should pay a 
fair proportion of the expense as a betterment. The 
principle would hold good In this case, and the parties 
should pay for the improvement. The precedent was 
urged as important, affecting as it would a further 
large amount of property to be improved. A mistake 
had been made, and the 'Council should take the back 
track : and if equity could not be carried out, as much 
should be done as he had proposed. 

Mr. Jenks of Ward Three contended that the diffi- 
culty was almost wholly through the blunder Of the 
city, which should remedy it. The rescinding of the 
order was to meet the question of iujum tion. and the 
people were told that their rights should not be affect- 
ed by it. lie moved that the consideration of the or- 
der be postponed one week to allow inquiries to be 
made respecting it. 

Mr. Dennv of Ward Ten said he was not prepared 
to vote for the amendment at the present time, and 
moved that the order and amendment he printed and 
distributed to the members. 

Mr. Newton of Ward Nine also favored the post 
ponement. 

In answer to questions by Mr. Keith. Mr. Osborn 
stated that the order was rescinded by the advice of 
the City Solicitor, and that although the new one was 
apparently the same, the Solicitor considered there 
was a material difference. 

The question was further debated by Mr. Rice oi 
Ward Nine and Mr Osborn, when the postponement 
was carried. 

On motion of Mr. Snow of Ward Eleven it was or- 
dered that the acts known as the betterment law be 
printed and distributed to the members ofthe Council. 

Mr. Bishop of Ward Seven moved to take from the 
table the resolve and order for the widening of High 
street. Lost. 

Adjourned. 



PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



4,0 



Proceedings of Board of Aldermen, 



NOV. (I, 1868- 



A meeting of the Board of Aldermen was hold at 
12 O'clock, noon, today, Mayor Shurtleff in the chair. 

RETURNS OF TOTES. 

Alderman Talbot, from the committee to examine 
the returns of votes cast on the 3d inst. fen- national, 
State and county officers, made a report, in which 
they stated that they found the returns appear to be 
correct in form, and the results are copied in the book 
kept for that purpose. 

The committee recommend tha< the usual certificates 
be signed and transmitted to the Secretary's office, 
and that the City Clerk notify the persons declared 
to be duly elected Representatives from the respec- 
tive districts designated by the committee. 

In conclusion the Committee state thai they have re- 
ceived a request signed bv ten legal voters in Ward 
Five, stating that they believe the returns of votes for 
Senator ami Representatives from that Ward are er- 
roneous. The Committee proprose, therefore, to count 
the ballots for said officers in that ward, and they ask 
for further time in which to report on this matter. 

The report was accepted. 

The official report of some of the votes in Boston 
is as follows : 

For Electors— David Sears of Boston bad 1.">,4:>1 ; 
John H. Clifford of New Bedford. 15,433; Josiah G. 
Abbott of Boston, 12,235; John R. Briggs of Sheffield 
12,234. 

For Governor— William Claflin of Newton, u.siii; 
John Q. Adams of Quincy, 12,884; J. C>. Adams of 
Newton, 7; Adams, lit; Scattering. 12. 

For Councillor, District No. 4 — Otis Norcross of Bos- 
ton had 10,857 ; Thomas C. Amory of Boston, s'(j:50; 
Scattering, 6. 

REPRESENTATIVES IN CONGRESS. 

District3— Ginery Twichell ofBrookline bad 8568 

Edwin (J. Bailey of Boston 6648 

Scattering 1!) 

District 4— Samuel Hooper of Boston ..0498 

Peter Harvey of Boston .">744 

Scattering 2 

ORDERS PASSED. 

On motion of Alderman White, it was ordered that 
the Overseers of the Poor be authorized to expend a 
sum not exceeding $3000 in furnishing the rooms in 
the Central Charity Bureau building, and that said 
amount be charged to the special appropriation for 
the erection of said building. 

On motion of Alderman While, Ordered, That the 
Overseers of the Poor be ami are hereby authorized 
to designate the charitable societies which shall be 
permitted to occupy rooms in the building on Char- 
Son street erected for their use, and to assign rooms 
for such societies. 

Alderman Pratt Offered the following order, which 
was adopted: 

Ordered that the petitioners in favor of widening 
Hanover street be granted a hearing at this Board on 
Monday, Nov. 9, at 4 1 , o'clock P. M. 

The Board adjourned to Monday, at twelve o'clock 
M. 



Proceedings of Board of Aldermen, 



jYOV. 9, 1SGS. 



The regular weekly meeting of Ibe Board of Alder- 
men was held at 4 o'clock, P. M., Mayor Shurtleff 

presiding. 

A l'l'OI NTM ENTS CONFIRMED. 
Elijah D. FOSS and William B.Tarlton as Constables. 
JOaiah M. Thing as a Weigher of Coal. 



PETITIONS PRESENTED \N1> REFERRED. 

S. S. Rowe and others, that East Dedham street and 
East Canton street be paved, &c; referred to Com 
mittee on Paving. 

Win. E. Collin and others, /'or the extension of O 
street in a southerly direction ; referred to Commit- 
tee on Streets. 

Alsom Garcelon, against assessment for betterment, 
on Brimmer street ; referred to Committee on Streets. 

Win. R. Bryden, that a cess-pool be constructed on 
Curve street, between Tyler and Hudson streets, and 
that the edge-stones and sidewalks be relaid ; referred 
to < lommittec on Paving. 

Metropolitan Railroad Company for a location in 
Temple place, and for an additional track in Wash- 
ington street, from Boylston street to Temple place; 
referred to Committee on Taxing. 

Stephen Hammond and others, that sidewalks be 
laid on Dudley street, between Warren street and 
Mount Pleasant avenue; referred to Committee on 
Paving. 

George Parker and others, that measures be taken 
to prevent the earth from the City's land washing 
upon Heath street; referred to Committee on Public 
Lands. 

James B. Case and others, for a gas lamp in Bum- 
st -ad court; referred to Committee on Lamps. 

Jeremiah Colburn and others, that edgestones be 
reset and sidewalks laid on Cast Newton street, south 
side; referred to Committee on Paving. 

Executor of Benjamin Adams, against the proposed 
laying out of streets on flats of South Boston; refer- 
red to Committee on streets. 

School Committee, for additional Primary School 
accommodations in the Dearborn district; referred 
to Committee on Public Instruction. 

A notice of a proposed petition to the General 
Court by the Pawner's Bank, for an ammendment of 
charter," was referred to next City Council. 

NOTICES OF INTENTIONS TO BUILD. 
John R. Hall, corner of Walnut avenue and Elmore 
street; Samuel Small, Lexington, between Brooks 
and Putnam streets; Keuney & ('aider, Marion, 
between White and Monmouth streets; Morton & 
Che-ley on land between Plympton and Warehani 
streets; A. J. Tibbelts, Perrin. between Moreland 
and Clifford streets; Nathan D. Conant, Prentiss, be- 
tween Hallock and Parker streets; Adams & Bar- 
stow, Brimmer street, near Mount Vernon street ; 
James McNeal, Columbus avenue, between Clarendon 
and Dartmouth streets; Daniel Briscoe, south side of 
sixth street, between O and P streets: severally re- 
ferred to Committee on streets. 

COMMUNICATION. 

A communication was received from the Roxbury 
Charitable Society, with a vote of thanks to the city 
for providing a room for the use of said Society. 
Read and sen! down. 

QUARTERLY REPORT. 

The Quarterly Report of the City Clerk for the 
quarter ending Oct. 31, was presented, exhibiting 
receipts as follows, which had been paid into the ( ilv 
Treasurer: 

Received for recording mortgages of per- 
sonal property and mechanics liens $420 60 

Licenses of hi Hard saloons 56 00 

" Intelligence offices 12 00 

" "Auctioneers 4 00 

Record of goods found '2.") 

$492 85 

The report was read and sent down. 

AUDITOR'S MONTHLY EXHIBIT. 

The monthly exhibit of the Auditor, as shown by 
the books in his office, Nov. 1, 1868, including the 
November draft, being seven months' payment of the 
financial year, was presented in print, a summary Ol 
which i« as follows: Of the general appropriations, 
revenues, &c, amounting to $7,101,006 37, the sum of 
$3,401,381 34 has been expended, leaving unexpended 
$3,699,625 03; of special appropriations of $3,586,433 76, 
the sum of $1,697,137 74 has been expended, leaving 
$1,839,296 02 unexpended. 

HEARINGS ON ORDERS OF NOTICE. 

The bearing on order of notice for assessment of 
betterments in the extension of Brimmer street, took 
place, when the above mentioned petition of Alsom 
Garcelon was put in. 

Samuel Eliot Stated that the property which he 



50 



PPOr'PPPX^TOS OF CITY COTJNCIT^. 



repre ented was injuretl rather than bettered by the 
exteusion of Brimmer street, for the reason thai it. 
divided ii Into unequal parts, and thai II could nol be 
sold to good advant ige for building purposes. 

Tin' report was recommitted. 

In the orders of notice returnable today, the foil >w- 
ing were recommitted, no person appearing to object : 

Order of notice on location of the Margin it Freight 
Railroad ( !o. in Haverhill street. 

Order of notice in reference to laying out Kendall 
street from Shawmut avenue 1 > Tremont street. 

Order of notice on fixing the boundaries of streets 
in South Boston, as determined bj Commissioners. 

On motion of Alderman James the following order 
was referred to the Committee on Streets, with the 
abo\ e : 

Ordered, thai the Committee on Streets be directed 
to consider and report on the expediency of laying 
out as public highways Bolton, Athens, Silver, Gold, 
Bowen and Tudor streets in connection with the 
streets heretofore recommended by said committee 
to be laid out in South Boston. 

WIDENING OF HANOVEB STREET. 

The hearing of petitioners for the widening of i Ian 
over street, assigned for I 1 , o'clock, was taken up. 

Francis E. Parker, for petitioners, presented ad- 
ditional petitions in favor of said widening. Win. 
Ropes, one of the petitioners, representing owners 
of several stores on tii ■ northerly sHe of Hanover 
street, adjoining the American House, said there 
could be no doubt of the necessity for a widening in 
the vicinity of those stores. The street would be 
benefited by the prop »sed widening:, and he expect sd 
to be requir sd to pay for so much of the ii stl smaents 
as may b i assessed upon thai prop rty. The measure 
was required as a means of doing the business on the 
street, and necessary tor (lie com fort of those doing 
business, as well as for the travel; unless widened 
now. tin.' street would lose its character as an impor- 
tant avenue. The effect would be to increase the value 
of property, not immediately his own property, as he 
believed, 6ut eventually. The increased cost would 
more than pay for the widening. 

In answer to the question of Alderman Talbot, how 
much should be paid by the property owners, should 
the avenue to Blackstone street cost $500,000, he said 
he should expect to pay a fair proportion. He did 
not believe in a measure of half widening, for it 
would he but a waste of expense. Ithasappeared 
heretofore that there was cause of regret when such 
opportunities were neglected. His own stores and 
the property of Mr. Ric s's were good enough, and he 
believed there might be erected throughout the 
Street first class stores, which would be demanded 
by the business, through the proposed improvements. 

It would not be expected that much higher rent 
should be received for the stores in the upper part of 
the street. 

In answer to Mr. Parker, he said that notices had 
been given for raising ot rents, on account of the pro- 
posed improvements, but particularly- on the Oodman 

estate, represent ,'d by him, where the rents had been 
too low. 

F. F. Raymond, owner of property on the corner oi 
Hanover and Gross streets, was ot opinion that the 

street should be widened its whole length, it was 

difficult to do heavy business on account of the narrow- 
ness of the street, aud the streel was too narrow for 

the travel. The increase offoot travel had been very 
great from Chelsea and Bast Boston, as well as from 
the extreme North End. The effect of widening would 
be to enhance the value of property . lie did not sup- 
pose his estate would be assessed for betterment bj 
widening the upper pari of the street merely, but 
should expect to be assessed shouid the widening 
reach his vicinity. In the course of annexation of 
Chelsea ami Charlestown, which was probable, there 
would be a greater necessity for widening the street. 

The widening of North ami other streets had not re- 
lieved to any extent Hanover street, which was the 
main artery of the north part Of the City. 

F. I'.. VVentworth, a tenant on Hanover street, near 
Portland street, said lie should be satisfied to paj 
more rent if the widening should lake place. The 
street was frequently blocked bj travel. He had been 
on tic street nine years, during which the travel had 
increased very much. So much benefit would it be, 
that the increased value would pay the expense in 
twenty years, A tenant next to the upper corner of 
Elm and Hanover streets had received notice ol'an in- 
crease of rent of thirty three per cent, on the rates 
paid for the last seven years. 



Peter B. Brlgham, occupant of the corner of Hanover 
and Court streets for fort* years, did not doubt that 
the widening of the street would be a great public 
benefit. The increase of travel hut been immense. 
The effect "f widening would be to increase the value 
of property' one hundred per cent, in ten year-, and 

this would make the Street one of the best in the city 

for retail purposes a- well as generally. Theamounl 

of travel is doubled at least every ten year- I wider 

sidewalks are needed. Had it been' w idene 1 many 
years since, the street would have been more like 
Washington street. The b stterment to the full ext ait 
of the law would be justifiable and every man own- 
ing property would be. better off. 

Lewis Bice, proprietor ol the American House, 
said the street was very much crowded, not being 
wide enough tor the buisness done, much less for t he 
buisness which would be done were the Btreet wid- 
ened. In the evening it is impossible to gel along 
the street, particularly on Saturday evenings. At 
times f l io street is blocked by carriages. The count, 
taken a year ago, showing 16,070 passengers and 1090 
carriages on a stormy da\ . he beleived to be correct, 
and on more favorable days the amount would be 
more than fifty per. cent additional. On the widening 
of the street lie should expect to pay for the better- 
ment, and believed that higher rents' would be de- 
manded and heavier buisness done. The property 
would be enhaced fifty per cent, and lie believed that 
the owners of property would be willing to pay the a- 
moiint of betterment required. As honorable 'men he 
would be willing to trust to the Board of Aldermen 
for the amount to be assessed. 

H. H. Leavitt, owner of a leasehold estate adjoin- 
ing Concert Hall, had believed fir '.cars that Hanover 
street should be widened. The sidewalks are very 
narrow, and lie had been told by a tenant on the street 
that much of his trade was rushed by his door on ac- 
count of the narrowness of sidewalks. Even on Court 
street, with wider sidewalks, he did not doubt that 
he lost business on account of the rush from Hanover 
street. The street was not wide enough for the busi- 
ness of the street. The enhanced taxes by improve- 
ment for ten years would pay the bills. 

S. S. Holton, IIS Hanover street, a tenant and retail 
dealer in shoes, said that the short time he had been 
in Hanover street he was surprised at the immense 
travel in the street and in its benefits as a retail street. 
The sidewalks are much obstructed, so much so as to 
push people into the streets. He did not look at the 
matter as one of local interest merely, but a- a resi- 
dent of Middlesex county and observer of the great 
increase of travel from towns in that county who pass 
into or through Hanover street. Gentlemen who for- 
merly rode in their own carriages, complain that they 
cannot do so now on account of its crowded condition. 
The crowd is greater in the vicinity of his store than 
in the upper part of the street. The property general- 
ly in that section of the city would be increased in 
value. As the main artery in that section of the city, 
it is important that the street should be widened. 

Cyrus Wakefield of Wakefield owner of property 
at the corner of Hanover and North Center streets, 
was of opinion that Hanover street should be widened 
its whole length, and it should have been done long 
since. The business of East Boston, Chelsea, and 
other places, requires that this widening should take 
place. He believed that by widening ol the street it 
will be one of the best streets in the city, and it would 
have been much better had this widening been done 
ten or twenty years ago. It was difficult, oftentimes, 
to get goods through the street for the benefit of the 
owners. The widening would benefit the whole North 
End. The effect of the narrowness ot the streets in 
that section is bad on strangers who come in over the 
railroads from the north". The widening of other 
streets of the City and not those of the North End 
would be to Cause the latter to retrograde, and not 
only would its reflect action be bad on business, but 
the neglect would be to reflect to the disadvantage of 
the City Government. There must be a certain 
amount and kind of business done there, and that 
part of the cit\ is particularly suited to a heavy class 
of business. He advocated a betterment law for the 
purpose of getting improvements of this kind, because 
they could not be obtained in any other way, and was 
perfectly willing to pay any assessments of' that kind 
on his proper.y. 

(has. E. Wiggin, owner of property at the corner of 
Hanover and Marshal streets, although his own store 
would be injured by cutting it off, did not doubt that 
great benefit would result from the widening. The 
street is often blocked, the travel is immense and 



PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COTJISrCIL. 



51 



constantly increasing. The crowding of Hanover 
street is as great as that of Court street near Howard 
street, of which so much has been said. The widening 
of the street would beagreat benefit to the North End. 
The cutting off of a triangle from the head of the 
street down would be some reliel, but not that which 
is needed. 

Edward H. Dunn, owner of estate at the corner of 
Hanover and Richmond streets, was of opinion that 
by the widening the value of property would be in- 
creased and a better class of tenants would be ob- 
tained. Nopartofthe city needed improvement so 
much as this street, asagreal avenue 

Mr. Parker read the measurements of the street at 
various points, between the curbstones, much of the 
distance being below twenty feet, and the greater 
part not more than twenty-two to twenty-four feet. 

Mark Googins, a resident ol Easl Boston, but not 
an owner of property on Hanover street, stated that 
he was often delayed in the street. Hanover street is 
the natural avenue from East Boston, and it is the 
interest of East Boston, Chelsea and other places 
that the street should he widened. 

Job A. Turner, owner of the Webster House, be- 
lieved the widening of Hanover street called for, for 
the various reasons stat B d. So crowded was it, that he 
rarely attempted to drive a carriage through it. He 
thought the value ol properly would be increased, 
and he was willing to be assessed lor betterment, 
"requently he drove through North street, to avoid 
the crowded condition of Hanover street, although it 
would be bis straightest course through Hanover 
street. The widening would be beneficial in facilities 
for (loin;;- a better class ol business. 

Dwight Wheelock, dry goods dealer on Hanover 
-i i . t, agreed with other-, that the si reel was frequent- 
ly blocked, the sidewalk was to narrow, and the facil- 
ities for business were lessened by the narrowness of 
the street. 

Mr. Parker said he could offer much more evidence 
in favor of widening this street. The city had done 
much in widening old streets in other portions of the 
city and in laying out wider streets elsewhere, while 
the old portions of the city having good natural facili- 
ii is for business bad been neglected, not only driving 
business away, but forcing into its narrow streets an 
undesirable class of population. That portion of the 
city and East Boston have a risrht to demand one 
good thorough-fare through the North End. Give the 
North End a chance and Hanover street will be the 
back bone for that portion of the city. 

The special as isrnment— the report inexpedient to 
establish the criminal courts in the jail-yard— was 
postponed to Monday next. 

unfinished business. 

The following order-; were passed. 

Resolve and order for the widening of Bedford 
street, by taking 581 feet of (he estate of the late James 
II. Foster, at an expense of $4680. 

Order to pay the Free Church of St. Mary $2000 for 
damages by c'hanee of grade of Richmond street. 

Order to pay Samuel ToplifFs heirs $3314.89, for 
damages by change of grade of Oliver street. 

PAPERS FROM THE COMMON COUNCIL. 

The petitions of Stephen Chamberlin and Charles F. 
Coffin for leave to erect wooden buildings in Ward 
Twelve camo up on the question of concurring with 
the Common Council, in a change of reference. 

Alderman Richards opposed concurrence, and 
Imped that the Board would insist upon its former ac- 
tion. 

Alderman Talbot said he understood that the Com- 
mittee on the Fire Department, to which the Council 
bad made their reference, had no jurisdiction over 
the matter of the petitions. 

Alderman Richards said it was for that reason he 
moved a reference of the petition to a special com. 
niittee, and as two members of the Committee on the 
Fire Department had already expressed an opinion on 

the subject, it would not be just to the petitioners to 

refer the petitions to that committee. 

Other petitions from the Common Council were re- 
ferred in concurrence, and the passage of the follow- 
ing orders were concurred in. 

Order for additional appropriation for paving, 
amended, by striking out the transfer of $25,000 from 
south End drainage. 

Order for repairs on Austin Primary School Douse, 
referred to Committee on Public Instruction. 
REPORTS OF COMMITTEES. 

Alderman White, from the Committee on Licenses, 



reported in favor of the transfer of certain wagon li- 
censes, also for the licenses of exhibitions of animals, 
natural curiosities and paintings, the licenses of com 
mon victuallers, innholders, and newsboys specified, 
and for second baud dealers and intelligence oilier-. 
Severally accepted. 

Alderman Talbot, from the Committee on Streets, 
reported no action necessary on certain notices of in- 
tentions to build. Accepted. 

RECOUNT OF VOTES IN WARD FIVE. 

Alderman Talbot, trom the Special Committee on 
the petition for a recount of the votes in Ward Five. 
mad" a r 'port showing the following result : 

The vots forCliar.es L. Woodbury for >enalor was 
947; E. W. Morton, 782; there were four or five for 
persons not residents in the district and ineligible. 

For Represent itives the vol is were, Otis Rich, 1035; 
John P. Ordway. 712 : Dennis J. Gorman, 823; Win. 
G. Brooks, 843; John A. Daley, 557; PierceA. Doher- 
ty, 4S6; John W. Foye, 391. 

The committee found the original returns to be 
incorrect in count, but, the difference was not suf- 
ficient to affect the result. They recommended that 
the returns be amended by the Citj Cltrk, in accor- 
dance with the corrected returns. Accepted. 

Alderman Braman, from thn Committee on Lamps, 
reported favorably on petition of .lames Collins, for 
a gas lamp on P street, between Broadway and Third 
street. Accepted. 

Alderman Braman reported inexpedient on petitiou 
of N. D. Silsbee and others, for a lamp on Codman 
avenue, also on petition of Francis J. Ward, for the 
lighting of Longwood avenue. Severally accepted. 

Alderman Talbot, from the Committee on Streets, 
report d a schedule of assessments for betterments. 
Laid on i he table and ordered to be printed. 

ORDERS OF NOTICE. 

Orders of notice were reported and adopted on 
matters as follows : 

Order of notice, for a hearing on petition of the 
Metropolitan Railroad Company for an additional 
I rack on Tremonl street from Common street t i Boyl- 
Ston Street, and for a turnout in Dudley street, Mon- 
day, Nov 30,4 o'clock, P. M. 

Order of notice on petition of Hobbs & Preseott, for 
a stable for more than four horses on West Brook- 
line street, November Hi, 4 P. M. 

ORDERS PASSED. 

Order, for the Collection of assessments for side. 
walks in several streets specified. 

Order, for the abatement of specified nuisances. 

Order, revoking the building permit of Win. M. 
Rumery, at the corner of Tremont, West, and Mason 

streets', and directing the Chief of Police to remove 

all obstructions. 

Order, requesting the Mayor in behalf of the City 
Council to petition the General Court for' a change in 
the boundary line between the city and Brookline. 

Order, directing the Superintendent of streets to 
erravel a portion of Albany street, between Dover and 
Maiden streets, at a cost of s_>(HM). 

Order, directing the Superintendent of Streets to set 
back the edgestones and sidewalks on Tremont street 
between Eliot and Pleasant streets, to the m w line id' 
widening, and that the chief of lb dice notify abut tors 
to remove all obstructions. 

Order, directing the Superintendent of Streets to 
place -neb portions of Berkeley street as are now - or 
may hereafter be accepted, in a safe condition for 
public travel, also to erect fences and lay plank side- 
walks on the side Of said street where no houses have 
been built. 

The following order was passed in concurrence, as 
recommended by the Committee on the Fire Depart- 
ment : 

Order, that the Mayor be requested, in behalfofthe 
city Council, to petition tin- General Court for a 
more stringent law in relation to the manufacture 
and storage of petroleum within i he limits of the city. 

Adjourned to Monday next, I o'clock, P. M. 



52 



PROCEEDING'S OF CITY COUNCIL 



Proceedings of the Common Council, 

NOV. 12, l HCS. 



The regular weeklj meeting of the Common Coun- 
cil was held this evening, the President, (has. II. 
Allen, in the chair. 

PAPERS FROM THE BOARD OP ALDERMEN. 

Petitions were referred in concurrence. 

The quarterly report of the City Clerk was read, 
ami placed <>n file. 

The Auditor's exhibit, Nov. 7, and the letter of 
thanks from the Executive Committee of the Rox- 
bury Charitable Society, for the use of a room granted 
to I heir agent by the < ity Government, were severally 
read and placed on file. 

The following orders were passed in concurrence, 
the last amended : 

Order authorizing the expenditure of $3000 for the 
furnishing of the rooms of Central Charity Bureau 
Building. 

Order authorizing the Overseers of the poor to 
designate the charitable societies to be permitted to 
occupy rooms in said building. 

This was amended, on motion of Mr. Flynn of Ward 
Seven, so as to join the Committee on Overseers of the 
Poor and Temporary Home, with the Overseers of 
the Poor in the designation. 

Tlie order requesting the Mayor to petition the 
General Court for a change of the line between Boston 
and Brookline coming up, in answer to an inquiry as 
to the necessity of the measure. 

Mr. Osborn of Ward six stated that the present 
boundary line was a brook, and it was designed sim- 
ply to straighten the line. 

Mr. Train of Ward Three said lie desired official in- 
formation in such cases. There bail been too much 
action without understanding the ground upon which 
important changes are made, and ne moved a refer- 
ence to the Committe on streets. Carried. 

The adherence by the Hoard of Aldermen to its 
votes, referring to a special Committee the petitions 
of( lharles F. Coffin and Stephen Chamberlin severally, 
for leave to erect wooden buildings in Ward Twelve, 
came up again for concurrence, the question being on 
disposal of the first named. 

Mr. Bishop of Ward Seven, in view of the passing 
to and fro of this matter several times, moved that the 
Council recede from its former action and concur with 
the Board of Aldermen. 

Mr. Wadsworth moved to refer to the Committee on 
the Fire Department of the Council. 

The Chair stated the question was on receding. 

Mr. Tucker of Ward Six hoped the matter would 
not be referred to the Committee on Fire Department, 
since that Committee had once acted on the subject, 
when the report of the minority was accepted. 

Mr. Denny of Ward Ten inquired whether the peti- 
tion bad been referred to any committee on the part 
of the Council. 

The chair stated the various forms of action which 
bad been taken, and that the petitions had not been 
referred to a committee of this branch. 

Mr. Train of Ward Three, thought it was not com- 
petent for the Council to vote to recede, the Council 
having voted to adhere, and the proper course to pur- 
sue was for the Hoard of Aldermen to ask for a Com- 
mittee of Conference. 

The Chair was of opinion that the motion was in ef- 
fect a motion to reconsider the previous action of the 
Council. 

Mr. Snow of Ward Eleven stated the grounds of 
the Board of Aldermen for the action of that branch, 
that the Committee on the Fire Department was ap- 
pointed for the purpose of approving bills, and it was 
not belived to be competent to call the committee to- 
gether to consider this subject. 

Mr. Van Nostraud of Ward Twelve said the question 
was simply that of allowing the petitioner to put up 
another building adjoining one already erected, to 
correspond with that, which happens to exceed in 
height by one fool the requirements of the ordinance. 
The building already up was erected when no objec- 
tion was made. 

Mr. Wright of Ward Twelve wished to know wheth- 
er it was not competent for the Council to refer to the 
Committee on the Fire Department on the part of the 
Council. 

The Chair stated that the proper course would first 
be to reconsider the refusal to recede, then vote to re- 



cede, when a reference might be made to a special 
committee. 

Mr. Wright Inquired whether there was a Joint. 
Standing Committee of the Common Council on the 
fire Department. 

The Chair stated that there was not. 

Mr. Wright moved to reconsider the refusal to re- 
cede. 

Mr. Wadsworlh of Ward Four wished to know if 
the ( ouncd had not the power to enlarge the powers 
of its committees? 

The motion to reconsider was larried. when the 
Council voted to recede, and on the motion of Mr. 
Wright the reference was made to the Committee on 
on the Fire Department on the part of the Council. 

The action on the petition of Stephen Chamberlin 
was reconsidered, and the same disposition was made 
Of it as in the case ol Collin. 

COMMUNICATION. 

Mr. snow of Ward Eleven submitted a communica- 
tion from the Trustees of the City Hospital, with a 
proposition for an amendment of the rules and regu- 
lations relating to the records of cases treated in the 
Hospital, so as to allow the records to be taken away 
for the purpose of making copies, in accordance with 
such regulations an the Trustees may make for their 
preservation. 

After some debate, in which opposition was made 
by Mr. Jenks of Ward Three, Mr. Keith of Ward Fif- 
teen stated that a* the restrictions were the same as 
related to all books of records in Courts of law and 
Probate offices, there should be no change without 
due deliberation, and a reference should be made to 
a committee before action was taken. 

On motion of Mr. Snow the matter was referred to 
the Committee on the City Hospital. 

PETITIONS PRESENTED AND REFERRED. 

Wm. H. Adams, for an order authorizing the sale 
of a lot of land on Dix place belonging to the city ; re- 
ferred to the Committee on Public Lands. 

Maria M. Ellis and others, trustees, for the refund- 
ing of taxes paid by mistake; referred to the Commit- 
tee on Assessors' Department. 

J. C. J. Brown that the original relative position of 
bis two bouses to the grade on Tremont street be re- 
stored; referred to the Committee on Church street 
district. 

REPORTS OF COMMITTEES. 

Mr Stevens of Ward Six, from the Committee on 
Streets, reported that the resolve and order for the 
wideiiing of Berlin street ought to pass. The pro- 
posed widening was from 14 to 40 feet, at a cost of 
$30,000. The widening was required tor an immedi- 
ate outlet with Tennyson street from Columbus aven- 
ue, it being doubtful how soon an arrangement can 
de made with the Providence Railroad corporation 
by which that avenue can be carried out as desired. 
The report was accepted and the order was passed. 

Mr. Stevens, from the same committee, reported in 
favor of the widening of Eliot street, by taking 809 
feet of land of heirs of Jonathan Patten, .'it an expense 
of $15,000. In view of the importance of the ultimate 
widening of this street t> fifty feet, the committee 
were of opinion that this widening should take place 
before parties bad prepared to build. Report ac- 
cepted and orders passed. 

Mr. Osborn of Ward Six. from the Committee on 
Public Instruction, on the orderfor grading and other 
improvements in the yard of the Austin Primary 
Schoolhouse, reported that the order should pass. 
Report accepted and order passed. 

The same Committee reported on the petition of A. 
II. Bean and others, tor a new Primary School in the 
Brimmer district; that it was the province of the 
School Committee to determine the necessity of new 
school;, and reported that the petition be transmitted 
to the School Committee. Accepted. 

Mr. Tucker Of Ward Six, from the Committee on 
Fire Department of the Common Council, to whom 
were referred the orders authorizing the Commit- 
tee on Public Buildings to purchase a lot of lard 
at the junction of Tremont and Dudley streets, for the 
purpose of having erected thereon a building to ac- 
commodate Hook and Ladder Company No. 4, and 
also to contain a ward room for Ward Fourteen, re- 
ported that they are satisfied from a personal inspec- 
tion and from the testimony of the Chief Engineer 
and the Assistant Engineer in the Highland District, 
that the lot opposite the Engine House No. 12 furnish- 
es the most desirable location for the Dook and Lad- 
der Company and the ward room. The lot contains 



PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



53 



7026 square feet, and can be purchased for $1.20 per 
Coot. The Committee recommend the passage of the 
orders in a now draft, providing as follows: 

Ordered, That the Committee on Public. Buildings, 
be authorized to purchase a lot of land at the j unci ion 
of Warren and Dudley streets, opposite Warren En- 
gine House No. 12, containing 7026 feet more or less, 
for the purpose of having erected thereon a building 
to contain accommodations for Hook and Ladder Co. 
No. 4, and a ward room for Ward 14, the amount paid 
for said lot not to exceed the sum of $3500. 

Ordered, That the Treasurer be anthorized to bor- 
row, under the direction of the Committee on Finance, 
the sum of $9000, to be applied for the purchase of the 
said lot of land. 

Mr. Kingsbury of Ward Fifteen hoped that action 
would nol be taken on this matter at this time, for 
the reason that himself and another member of the 
committee had no part in its consideration, and moved 
its recommittal. 

Mr. Jenks of Ward Three inquired why the price 
of the land in question had risen from eighty-five 
cents to one dollar and twenty. 

Mr. Hobbs of W ir 1 Four! sen opposed recommittal, 
and in reply I > Mr. .Jenks stated that the rise in the 
price of the" land was through the opposition which 
had been made. 

The motion to recommit was carried. 

On motion of Mr. Flynn of Ward Seven, it was 
ordered that the Committee on Fire D3partment of 
the Common Council consider and report on the ex- 
pediency of furnishing accommodations for a hook 
and ladder carria ?e in South Boston 

M. Rice Of Ward Nine submitt -d an order authoriz- 
ing the taking of a parcel of land belonging to the 
Revere Copper Co., bounded by lands ot Joseph E. 
ami Nithen Brown, the Boston Wat sr Power Co., 
Columbus ave m \ as established by a resolve passed 
sept. 2t, 1868, Tennyson str set as it form srly exist 'd, 
anil land formerly owned by Thomas P. Walton and 
Jacob Frost, containing 3284 square feet. 

[n explanation it was stated that the order was to 
rectify an error iu the taking of the same laud pi evi- 
ou-ily, and under a suspension of the rules the order 
was passed. 

A communication was received in print, from the 
Committee on Public Buildings, requesting an addi- 
tional appropriation of $15,000 to defray the ordinary 
expenses ofthat department For the remainder to the 
tin metal year. The appropriation for the year was 
$50,000, nearly all of which has been expended, and, 
in addition, expenditures, hue been Incurred for pur- 
poses not anticipated when the annual appropriation 
w as asked for, amounting to upwards <>f $21,000. An 
order for the transfer of $15,000 from the Reserved 
Fund to the Appropri iti >n for Public Buildings was 
read once and referred to the Committee on Finance. 

On motion of Mr. Bishop of Ward seven the resolve 
and order for the widening of High street was taken 
from the table. 

Mr. Jenks of Ward Three moved that the order be 
indefinitely postponed. 

The (hair ruled the motion out of order, the ques- 
tion being simply one of concurrence or not. 

Mr. Jenks opposed the proposed widening as un- 
necessary, and called for the yeas and nays on the 
passage Of the order. 

Mr. Flynn of Ward Seven said that parties had 
buiit on the understanding that the widening would 
take place, otherwise they would contest the better- 
ment assessed upon them. 

Mr. Wadsworth slated that the building of fifteen 
stores was contingent upon the proposed widening. 

The order was passed by a vote of 42 to 4 — noes, 
Jenks, Rogers, Van Nostrum! and Wells. 

CHURCH STREET DISTRICT. 

On motion of Mr. Osborn of Ward Six, the order 
authorizing the Committee on Church Street District 
to settle damages for land? taken in said district, 
was taken up, the pending question being on his a- 
niendment to apply the betterment laws to the im- 
provements on the district. 

Mr. Nelson of Ward Nine, opposed the amendment, 
on the ground that the question was not now an open 
one, and good faith to the owners of estates required 
its rejection, it was understood that all which was 
demanded of them was to clear their basements and 
make the necessary repairs on the buildings. That 
was the understanding of the City Government 
at the time of the passage of the original order. 
Another obj ction to the amendment ' was, that 
after dpdu ting damages, verv little or nothing 
would accrue to the city from the betterment; cer- 



tainly not enough to warrant the violation of the un- 
derstanding between the city and|the owners ofestates 
on the Church street territory. A correct interpreta- 
tion of the second order, passed some time since, 
showed that the city desired to get rid of the custody 
of the Church Street District on almost any terms. 

Mr. Osborn said he agreed with the gentleman from 
Ward 11 that there should be no violation of good faith, 
and the passage of his amendment, would not produce 
such a violation. It was believed and argued at the 
time of the adoption of the original orders, that the 
owners of the property on the Church Street District 
would all have a good thing under the proposed im- 
provement, and so far as he had the support of mem- 
bers in favor of his proposition, and iu refutation of 
the statement that the city desired so earnestly to re- 
lease the property as a sort of "elephant'' on ils hands. 
If there was a contract from which the city could not 
recede, then should the original resolution for the re- 
conveyance of property be passed again, for it could 
not be just to pass any amended order; and further, 
it appeared that where there are any vacant lots, a 
different policy was adopted, showing thai there is no 
obligation to pursue a particular course, and no pledge 
of the faith of the city in the matter. 

Mr. Wells of Ward Three opposed the amendment, 
assuming that the city was responsible for the defec- 
tive drainage and should be held to make the drain- 
age good. 

Mr. Osborn denied that the city was under any obli- 
gation in relation to defective drainage. 

Mr. Keith of Ward Fifteen believed it was too late, 
after contracts had been made and orders had been 
passed relative to filling this territory, to go back at 
this time t > adopt a different policy. ' The city is now 
under obligation to carry out its agreements, as held 
out to the parties interested, and he was in favor of 
the amendment of the gentleman from Ward Nine, to 
give authority to the Mayor to reconvey the propi rty. 
The fact that the ord t was r •considered does not af- 
fect the principle, and the Council should carry out 
in good faith the understanding which governed the 
Council in the passage of the original orders. 

Mr. Harris of Ward Eleven could not agree with 
the gentleman from Ward Six as to the responsibility 
of the nuisance; if it was by any fault of the citv, the 
city should abate it, at whatever expense. He Reliev- 
ed it to be (dear that the city is responsible and should 
bear the expense, and he should therefore vote against 
the amendment assessing betterment. 

Mr. Wilson of Ward Twelve denied that the citv was 
underany obligation to furnish drainage to the < iiure.h 
Street District, and the first sewer through Church 
street was a boon to the people ofthat section. As 
to the matter of a nuisance, there was not the nuisance 
which required abatement. Members of the citv Gov- 
ernment had bought property in this district simply 
upon speculation, and the city was under no more ob- 
ligation to improve that property at its expense than 
it was to make wide streets of narrow alleys, to bene- 
fit property owners. The rule ami the law is clear 
that those who make nuisances shall abate them. 

Mr. Denny of Ward Ten did not agree with either 

of the last two gentlemen who had spoken, the ques- 
tion being different from that slated by either ol them. 
The principle of the betterment act. lie believed was 
applicable to this case, and without any injustice to 
the pr rperty owners in the Church street district. Iu 
the widening of Pleasant street, betterment will be 
assessed, and he could see no reason why a differenl 
principle should be applied to property improved at 
a litlle distance from Pleasant street. lie contended 
that there was no contract in the premises, and that 
the city had a perfect ri rht to adopt any course it de- 
sired and said lie should vote for the amendment of 
the gentleman from Ward Six. 

Mr. Newton of Ward Nine said it appeared to be lost 
sight of that the owners of property were required to 
make repairs on their houses, and this amounted to a 
great, (leal. The city having passed the original or- 
der, he doubted whether it had the right to rescind it, 
and he should oppose the amendment of Mr. Osborn. 

Mr. Osborn, on the ground of consistency, could' 
not see how gentlemen could pass the Committee's 
order if they were opposed to his, for that was no less 
a violation of the original agreement. 

On motion of Mr. Flynn of Ward Seven, the pre- 
vious question was ordered after an adjournment was 
refused, when an amendment proposed by Mr. Nel- 
son, giving thepower to assess damages to commis- 
sioners, under the direction of the Church Streel Com- 
mittee, and with the approval of the Mayor, and the 
authority to the Mayor to reconvey the parcels of land 
taken, was carried and the amendment of Mr. Osborn 



54= 



IMJOOKKIUXCfS OF CITY COUXOIL. 



u as rejected by the following vote : 
Yeas— Messrs. Batchelder, Butter, Carney, Denny, 
Keaney, Osbom, Parker, L. Hire, 8 now, Wadsworth, 
Weston, Wilson, Young — 13. 

Nays — Messrs. Bean, Bryden, Dlnsmore, Dolan. 
Emerson, Flanders, Flynn, Gray, Harris, Hdpkins, 
Jacobs, Jenks, Keith, Kingsburyj Knight, Leighton, 
Malone, Minon, Morse, Nelson, Newton, Pickering, S. 
Rice, Rogers, Ryan, Squires, Thayer, Van Nostrand, 
Wells, li. H. White, J. White, Wright— 32. 

Tin' order, as amended, was then passed in concur- 
rence with little opposition. It is as follows : 

Ordered, That the Commissioners <>n the Chirrch 
street District, under the direction of the Joint special 
Committee on the Church street District, and with 
the approval of His Honor the .Mayor, be authorized 
to setue and adjust damages for the taking of lands 
In the Church Street District, so called, with the for- 
mer owners thereof, severally, upon sueli terms and 
conditions as they shall deem expedient; and in mak- 
ing such settlements the Mayor is authorized tore- 
convey the several parcels of land so taken, or anv 
pnrts thereof. 

Adjourned. 



Proceedings of Board of Aldermen, 



.AT? V. 16, 1868. 



The regular weekly meeting of the Board of Alder- 
men was held this afternoon, Mayor Shaitleff presid- 
ing. 

APPOINTMENTS CONFIRMED. 

Jacob Hickman for duty at Howard Athenaeum; 
Hugh Parker at Christ Church ; special police officers 
w irhout pay. 

Josiah M. Thing. John Flynn, James G. Harrington, 
as constables. 

Wm. 15. Tarlton, Edwin G.Brown, as weighers of 
coal. 

James Farwell, as undertaker. 

PETITIONS PRESENTED AND REFERRED. 

Manson & Peterson, for leave to erect certain wood- 
en buildi igson Per ler street, East Boston. Referred 
to Committee <>n Fire Depart : e t. 

Charles K. Darling and other-, owners of estates on 
Ti-'inont street, that th ir houses be raised fully up to 
the new grade. Hi f rred to the Committee on Church 
Street District. 

Edward I.. Jenkins, to be paid a claim for damages 
as lessee of one-half of house No. 33:5 Tr -m out street. 
Referred to Committee on Church street District. 

John Haskins and others, against the erection of 
certain wooden huildines on Ottawa street. Referred 
to Committee Oil Fire Department. 

Wm ( ;. Lincoln and 50 others, owners of estates on 
Fort Hill, in favor of the petition of the Board of 
Trade f.ir a street out hundred feet wide from Rowe's 
wharf to Fast Boston Ferry, as a place of rleposit for 
material from said bill. Referred to Committee on 
Streets. 

George H.Plummer and 54 others of Ward One, for 
the widening of Hanover street. Referred to the 
Committee on Streets. 

Lyman J. Clark and others, for crossing stones on 
Longwood avenue, from Plymouth to Auburn streets. 
Referred to Committee on Paving, with full powers. 

Noble H. Hill and others, tint crosswa'ks he laid in 
Shawmut av iuic. at Union Park. Referred to 
Committee on Paving, with full powers. 

John Kludge, lor use of mice n feet of Treroont street, 
for building purposes. Referred to Committee on 
Paving, with full powers- 
Alexander Johnson, for the grade of Bainbridge 
street. Referred to Committee on Paving. 

N. B. Gihhs and others, for a plank walk on the 
Public Garden. Referred to Committee on Common. 

s. a. st itson ami others, that the wooden buildings 
standing in Ferdinand street may he removed. 
Keferr d to Committee on Paving. 

Loyal Lovejoy and others, against the extension of 



Allen street to Charles street. Referred to Committee 
on streets. 

School Coinmitle, for a change in the Pavement of 
East street, near the schoolhonse. Referred to 
Committee on Paving. 

David Reed and others, that sidewalks he laid in 
Bainbridge street. Referred to Committee on Paving. 

Dexter A. Tompkin- and other-. McKav, Aldus and 
Others, for the widening of Hanover street. Referred 
to Committee on street-. 

XOTK l> OF INTENTION- TO Bl II. I). 
A. <;. Read, Perrin street; Abbot Loring, corner of 
Third and K streets; A. D. Hoitt, 1":; Friend street; 
F. A. Libliey, Dorchester, a nth of federal street; 
Geo rge Hargrove, corner of Saratoga and Putnam 
streets, K. Boston ; Daniel Sullivan, Sullivan street, 
between Dorchester and K Streets: J. & W. R. <a\- 
anagh, Eighth, between D and E -rivet-; Manson 
Peterson, Bonier street, above Central square; also 
on Border, between Decatur and Maverick street-: 
Joseph Leahy, rear of 133 n street: Henry 
B. Stratton, corner of Eight and F street-: J. W. 
Milligan, 2>> Federal street; D. F. McGilvrav, 171 
Treiuont street; Caleb Kimball, Sixth, between Land 
M street- : Edwin Adams Charlestown street ; between 
Causeway andTravers streets; Francis Bissett, Havre 
street; E. Downing, White, between Marion anil 
Brooks streets; Alexander Johnson, Bainbridge 
street. Severally referred to the Committee on 
Streets. 

UNFINISHED BUSINESS. 
The order to expend siSOO for furniture and carpets 
for the offices at the jail was taken up and passed. 

HEARINGS ON" ORDERS OF NOTICE. 
The bearing on the order of notice for the laving 
out of Warren avenue as a public street came up, 
when, 110 one opposing, the order was recommitted. 
The hearing on petition of Hobbe & Prescott for a 
stable for more than four horses was called up. anil 
no one appearing, the petition was recommitted. 
EATING OFT OF BERKELEY STREET. 
The order of notice for a hearing on laying out 
Berkeley street from Pro\ Science street to Beacon street 
took place by assignment. 

An order, introduced by Alderman Braman, was 
passed, inviting the City Solicitor to appear in behalf 
of the interests of the city. 

Alderman Messinger stated that as things now stand 
the Board could not lay out Berkeley street more than 
sixty feet in width, and, under the circumstances, be 
moved an indefinit ! postponement of the subject. 

Alderman Richards did not feel like taking action 
on the subject until he was better informed, and he 
understood that the Committee on Street- proposed 
reporting further in relation t 1 the acceptance of the 
street at the present ses-i;>n of tic Board. 

Alderman Talbot said that this order contemplated 
laying out the strc t from Providence str et to Beacon 
street, over the land of the Commonwealth, while 
the others to be reported upon had relation to the 
other end ot the street. 

Alderman Richards hoped that such documents 
would be forwarded to the Board as would enable 
them to understand fully the relation to the city and 
of individuals to the laying out of the street, and as 
such documents could be bad, a postponement of ac- 
tion should take plase. 

Alderman Messenger said the Stat- could not grant 
more than sixty feet, and as no more light could be 
given on the subject than was now accessible, the 
question might as well be settled now a- at any future 
time. 

Alderman Richards wished to be informed whether 
there was power to lay out the street to more than 
sixty feet; if there was, lie wished to have it made 
known. 

Alderman Messenger said then' was no power for 
the city to take the Commonwealth lands, but for the 
purpose of allowing Mr. Matthews to make a state- 
ment, he would withdraw his motion. 

O.i motion of Alderman Braman, the City Solicitor 
was invited to state the circumstances of the change 
in the wi It'i of the street, and the power of the city iu 
til ! pr anise-. 

Mr. H'dev, City Solicitor, in a statement which he 
proceeded to srive, slid he thourht the question was 
very fairly st tted by the Commit! se of the Le rislature 
last year. The stat >, Wit a- Power Co. and City each 
hid their rights in the matter offlowaga: but when 
it bee nne e\p 'di ait t< have the land tilled the city 
surrendered its rights except to streete and drainage. 



PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUTSTOIE. 



55 



These were settled under the tripartite agreement be- 
tween the State, Citv, and Water Power Co. The 
thins- went along- until 1804, when the contract was 
modified, except in regard to Berkeley street, while 
the main features of the contract were reaffirmed. 
It had hpeii contended that under the act of 1S04 the 
power was given to alter streets; but this did not 
effect Berkeley Street, the original contract, laying 
it out to eighty feet, being reaffirmed. 

After all this had been done, and all but four lots 
in hat street had been sold, abutters inclosed ten feet 
on each side as yards, and they went to the Commis- 
sioners to get authority to do so, but were told that 
they could not do so exi opt by sufferance, by permis- 
sion of the Stat? or by the city. The four remaining 
lots were also sold, with the same understanding. 
After this had occurred, a deed was made by the State, 
giving the street lo the city eighty feet wide. To this 
the abutters demurred, the deed "was withdrawn, and 
the matter went before the Legislature, and two re- 
ports were made, that of the minority being adopted. 
A mistake was made in the minority report, on the 
assumed ground thatavenne A meant Berkeley street, 
and the resolutions were passed under this mistake. 
The question now is, wh sther the plirhted faith of the 
State shall be set at defiance in the living out of this 
territory, and whether the city shall have the power 
to lay out the street as designed, and for the interests 
of the public, as a thoroughfare whi'-h must be sub- 
ject to a large amount of travel. If the Board of Al- 
dermen assent to this narrowing of Berkeley street, 
then the whole epi \-tim is set afloat, and all of the 
streets may lie altered alter being laid out. In his 
view, if the State was amenable at law as the Water 
Power Company or individuals might be, the city 
mi :ht assert and maintain its claim. 

The other part of the street, obtained from the Water 
Power Company, was eighty feet, and as this street 
was to be a main avenue of travel, it was important 
that the city should assert its right, for which it had 
paid, as fir as it was possible to do so. 

In answer to a question of Alderman Richards, 
whether there would bo a claim for damages should 
the Board of Aldermen lay out the street eighty feet, 
and order the removal of all obstructions, he doubted 
whether the e"itv could do so. The abutters themselves 
were aggrieved, but not by the city, and their rights 
would eventually be obtained from the State. It was 
not for the city to assert rights for individual d, who 
must be supposed to have known their rights when 
they bought property. 

In answer to Alderman Messingor he said he doubt- 
ed whether th 3 city hid a legal right to take more than 
sixty feet for the street. 

In" reply to Alderman Richards, he said he could 
not see how the matter could be put into a shape for 
a suit unless the St it ' itself should make a suit. The 
abutters might p 'tition the Legislature for a redress 
of grievances, and very likely would obtain it. 

In answer to Alderman Talbot, whether the city 
would lay out streets across the State lands, he could 
not see how it could be done. Berkeley street was 
laid out under a special law, and in relation to closing 
the street, he said it could not be closed, since it was 
an avenue from other streets, to which parties had a 
right of access. AH that the citv could do would be to 
put up its notices to the public that the street was un- 
safe and that would relieve it from all claims for dam- 
ages. 

Nathan Matthews, President of the Water Power 
Co., made a statement, in which he said that the City 
Solicitor had set forth the matter so clearly that little 
needed to be added. In the tripartite agreement the 
Water Power Co. had fulfilled all its obligations. In 
the original laying out of the streets across the Back 
Bay there was no connection with the streets running 
from Tremont street, but a change was proposed and 
affected through a Commission arranged by Alderman 
Peirec ami himself. 

In 1864 an agreement was made and signed by all 
the parties, that Berkeley street should be eighty feet 
wide, but subsequently Mr. Hooper obtained the priv- 
ilege of inclosing some of the street. This was follow- 
ed mi by others, and when the matter came before 
the Legislature to sanction the narrowing of the street 
to sixty feet, the committee made an able report a- 
gainst'it. By the pressure of the lobby, the minority 
report was passed, and the matter was placed in the 
hands of the Governor and Council to determine. 

Mr. Matthews contended, that the narrowing was 
an unjust transaction, unjust to the Water Power 
Company and to the abutters on the other end of the 
street and on other streets ; unjust because they had 



paid for their land on the understanding that this was 
to be an eighty feet street. He said he felt safe in 
the hands of the new Governor and Council, that they 
would see that justice was done, more particularly on 
account of Mr. Norcross being in the Council, who, 
as Mayor ol the city, became more familiar with this 
subject than any oiie else could do save the City So- 
licitor. 

The greatest argument used for the passage of the 
last act was, that the matter was safe in the hands of 
the State, but would not be in the hands of the Mayor 
and Aldermen of the city, for who could tell who 
might be elected to the office? Mr. Matthews at 
some length remarked upon the conduct of persons 
connected with the inclosure of portions of the street 
anil the action of the legislature. 

Mr. Healey made a few remarks additional, stating 
that while he agreed with Mr. Matthews in relation to 
the principle involved, ho would disavow any person- 
alities which he had used. And so far as Franklin 
Haven, one of the Commissioners, was concerned, he 
would be content to leave the whole matter to him in 
its settlement. 

On motion of Alderman Braman, it was 

Resolved, That it is inexpedient for this Board to 
take any action in regard to the acceptance of Berkeley 
street. ' 

PAPERS FROM THE COMMON COUNCIL. 

Petitions from the Common Council were referred, 
in concurrence, 

The request of Trustees of the City Hospital for a 
change in their rules and regulations coming up. 

Alderman Talbot said that such an arrangement 
had been made as would make any action of the Board 
unnecessary, and on his motion the matter was 
indefinitely postponed. 

The order for Overseers of Poor to select the so- 
cieties to occupy the Central Charity Bureau, amended 
by adding "and Committee on Overseers of Poor, 
etc.," was considered, on concurrence in said amend- 
ment. 

Alderman Talbot wished to know whether the use 
of the rooms referred to in the order was to lie given 
away. When the city agreed to put up the building, it 
was With the understanding that a certain amount 
was to be raised bv subscription, and only a very 
small sum had been raised. He deemed it proper for 
the city to retain control of the building. 

Alderman Braman said the building had been 
constructed for certain purposes, and the rooms were 
to be divided among certain societies, for their use. 
The power was first given into the hands of the 
Overseers of the Poor, and now it was proposed to 
join the Committee on Overseers with them. 

Alderman Richards said be had been asked many 
questions in relation to this building. It was import- 
ant to know who was to tike care of it and keep it in 
order; and it was important at first to put it in the 
position in which it was to remain. 

Alderman Messinger suggested as an amendment 
that this assignment be made subject to the approval 
of the City Council. 

Alderman Richards, in view of obtaining further 
information on the subject, moved that the order bo 
laid on the table. Carried. 

The other matters from the Common Council were 
passed in concurrence, as follows: 

Report, "reference to School Commttee,"of subject 
of a new Primary schoolhouse in the Brimmer 
District. 

Order to make repairs on Austin Primary School- 
house. 

R -quest of Committee on Public Buildings for an 
additional appropriation of $15,000, with an order 
to transfer that sum from the Reserve Fund. (City 
Hoc. 124.) Referred to Committee on Finance. 

Order to take laud of Revere Copper Company; 
3284 square feet. 

REPORTS OF COMMITTEES. 

Alderman White, from the Committee on Licenses, 
reported that the licenses of Frank Oliver, Xo. 141, as 
newsboy, and the license of Dennis Day of Somer- 
villo, collector of bones, be revoked. Severally 
accepted. 

The same committee also reported in favor of the 
transfer of certain licenses, and in favor of license-, 
as i nh older s, newsboys, dealers in secondhand 
articles, Ac., all of which were accepted. 

The Committee on Licenses, to whom was referred 
the communication of Major Edward J. Jones, in re- 
gard to giving him authority to make inspections un- 
der the license Law, reported that in their opinion the 






PROCEEDIXOS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



police force should, excute all the duties required by 
the city authorities for the enforcement of the law 9 of 
the Commonwealth and the ordinances of the city, 
and in order to carry into effect the provieione of 1 1 1 * - 
license act, they recommended the passage <>!' the 
following order: 

Ordered, That the Chief of Police be instructed i<> 
asc rt lin all the places where intoxicating liquors 
are kept for sale, and to report to this Board the names 
of the own :rs or keepers of such places, and whether 
or not they are li tensed according t<> law. 

The order was read twice and passed. 

Alderman Seaver, from the (' immittee on Ferries, 
on ilie petition of the East Bostou Ferry Company for 
an increase of toils, reported an order of notice, which 
w a- adopt 'd, for a bearing on the subject on Monday 
next. 23d November, at 4 o'clock I'. M. 

Alderman Talbot, from the Committee on Streets, 
reported no action necessary on certain notices of 

intention to build. Accepted. 

The same committee reported inexpedient on 
petition of Louis Prang and Rosa Prang, to define 
tlir line of Washington street, near Gardner street. 
Accepted. 

WIDENING OF HANOVER STREET. 

Aldermen Talbot, from the Committee on Streets, 
ma 'a report in print, tor the widening of Hanover 
street between Court and Blackstone streets, accom- 
panied by an order of said widening, according to 
plans numbered 1 and 2, made by the Cite Surveyor 
and deposited in ins ofilice, the expense thereof 
amounting tn $500,000. The order ami another for 
borrowing the money for said widening-, were read 
once. 

EXTENSION Of BROADWAY. 

The same Committee reported in print a resolve 
to extend Broadway from Federal street to Albmy 
street, crossing Foundry street at such an elevation 
that the clear height above il shall not be less then 
twelve feet, the Od Colony Railroad at a height 
not less than fourteen feet, anil Lehigh street not 
less than twelve feet, at an expense of $250,000, lor 
the taking of land and damages, and directing the 
treasurer to borroM $550,000 for said extension, in- 
cluding all necessary bridges and structures. The 
orders tor the widening and borrowing the money 
for that pnrpns ■ were read once. 

The same c immittee reported the resolve and order 
layi ig out and defi 11 ig the boundary lines of streets 
in South Boston, city document, No. 1-23. Read twice 
and passed. . 

The same committee reported orders for the laying 
out of Warren avenue, between Berkeley and Clar- 
endon streets, Montgomery street, between Claren- 
don and West Canton streets, and Berkeley street, 
between the southerly line of Stanhope street and the 
centre line of Providence street. 

The order- were severally passed, under suspen- 
sion of the rules. 

Alderman Talbot, in connect! >n witb the fist men- 
tioned order, offered the following, which was passed, 
aft T some explanations in relation to the necessity of 
the acti >n : 

Ordered, That that portion of Berkeley street laid 
out this dav as a public street, lying between the 
northerly has ■ of the northerly -tone abutment of fie 
bridge over the Boston & Providence Railroad and 
the southerly base of the southerly stf-ne abutment of 
>:uil bridge, be laid out, constructed and main- 
tained a- a brid re over the sild railroad, substantially 
as this sael in i Ige now exists, as her t ifor 1 construc- 
ted by said railroad coTporati >n, and 1 saving to said 
corporation the use and enjoyment of the premises 
under -aid bridge, a- now had and enj >vod by them. 

The -ame Committee reported a schedule of assess- 
ments for betterments on estat is abutting on Temple 
place, benefited by widening said place, amounting 
in all to $14,396 '<<>■ Read and passed. 

Alderman James, from the Committee on Paving, 
made several reports, with orders, which were read 
once. 

Alderman Messinger, from the Committee on 
Health, reported an order for the abatement of cer- 
tain nuisances, widen was passed. 

ORDERS PASSED. 

Order of notice, on petition of the the Metropolitan 

Railroad Company for a location in Temple place 
and an additional track in Washington sleet Inan 
Boyl-.fton street to Temple place, that a public hear- 
ing be given on Monday, December 7th, at -1 P. M. 

Order that Sullivan -treet, from D street to Old 



Harborstroet.be hereafter known a- Ninth street. 

Order that the Superintendent of Ilea 1 1 li be instruct- 
ed to supply a sufficient quantity of ashes for the grad- 
ing of a vacant lot on the corner of Commercial ami 
Battery streets, and that the same be charged to the 
appropriation tor public health, at the usual rate per 
load. 

order taken from the table) to widen Bummer 
street, by biking 323 feet of land of .Michael 11. oiee- 

-011, at an e-liinat id COSl of $4800. 

The report inexpedient to establish Criminal Court- 
in the jail-yard was further assigned, and the follow- 
ing order, offered by Alderman Messinger, was read 
ami laid on the table. 

Ordered, Thai the Committee on Public Buildings 
on the partof this Board, cause t > be prepared plans 
and estimates, not to exceed $75,000, for a building 
for the accommodation of the Municipal Court and 
the criminal session of the superior Court, to be lo- 
cated on the land connected with the BOfton jail, or 
land adjacent thereto, to be charged to the expense 
of the County of Suffolk. 

Aldermen Braman and Talbot, to be joined, were 
appointed a committee to confer with any committee 
representing the town of Brook! ine, on the subject of 
changing the boundary line between Boston and 
Brookline. 

Adjourned. 



Proceedings of the Common Council, 



NOV. 19, ISO 8. 



The regular weekly meeting of the Common Council 
was held this evening, the President, ('has. II. Allen, 
in the chair. 

PAPERS FROM THE BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 

The petitions of Charles K. Darling and others and 
ofE. L. Jenkins, were referred, in concurrence, and 
the following orders were passed in concurrence: 

Order instructing Superintendenl of Health to sup- 
ply a sufficient quantity of ashes for the grading Of a 
vacant lot on the corner of Commercial and Battery 
streets. 

Order for committee to be joined, to confer with 
any committee of Brookline, on the subject of chang- 
ing the line between that town and Boston. 

M --rs. Stevens of Ward six, Carney of Ward Two 
and Parker of Ward Fourteen were'joined to said 
committee. 

REPORTS OF COMMITTEES. 

Mr. Harrow of Ward Eight, from (he Committee on 
the Fire Department on (he partof the Common Coun- 
cil to whom was referred the subject of the expediency 
of furnishing accommodations for a Hook ami Ladder 
carriage in south Boston, made a report that they are 
unanimously in favor of such a measure, ami express 
the belief that with alterations on tie first tl tor of the 
building recently erected on the corner of Dorches- 
ter and Fourth streets, and occupied a- a ward room, 
accommodations can he furnished for a Hook and 
L idder Company and their apparatus at a small ex- 
pense. Th.'v report an or ler that the Committee on 
Public Buildings be requested to m ike the altera ti ins 
necessary in the building referred to, the expense to 
be charred to the appropri Ition for Public Buildings. 

Mr. Harrow moved a susp insion of the rules for the 
passage of the order at the present time. 

Mr. Wright of Ward Twelve objected to the passage 
of the order, the room in question being used as a 
Weed room. 

Mr. Harrow -aid the building was put up for an en 
sine hous •, and he could see no need of reserving it 
for a Ward room, to be used only two or three times 
a year, when they could have a splendid Ward room 
up stairs. By fitting up tin- room for a Hook and 
Ladder bouse, there would be a saving to the city of 
$30,000. 

Mr. Wright replied that the gentleman was in error 
a- t i the object ofthe buildin r, a- it was built express- 
ly for a Ward reoin. And then as U its being oeeu- 



PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



57 



pied but two or three days in a year, it is used as a 
school room. 

Mr. Wilson of Ward 12 said the Ward room was con- 
stantly in use for schools, that section of the city being 
inu -li pressed for school room. When the present 
structures now in erection are completed, they will 
not lie sufficient to accommodate ;ill of the schools 
now out of the school buildings. There are also cer- 
tain features in the structure of the building which 
will require such a change as may not meet the appro- 
bation of the Council, and he thought it inexpedient 
(o press the question on the passage of the order. 

Mr. Darrow said he knew what he was about; he 
had visited the building in company with the Chief 
Engineer of the Fire Department, who approved of 
its use lor (look ami Ladder carriage. The Fire De- 
partment had been euchered out of the use of the 
building, yet he was willing to let the matter rest a 
week for the accommodation of the gentlemen. 
, The further consideration of the order was passed 
over. 

Mr. Train of Ward Three, from the Committee on 
Finance, to whom was referred the request of the 
Committee on Public Buildings for a further appro 
priation for thai department, and an order for the 
transfer of $15,000 from the Reserved Fund to the ap- 
propriation for Public Buildings, made a report that 
the order oii-iil to piss. The report was accepted, 
and the order was passed under suspension of the 
rules. Yeas 42, nays none. 

Mr. Train, from the ( ommlttse on Ordinances, i > 
whom was referred an ordinance regulating the oc- 
cupation of Streets for building purposes, reported 
that the ordinance ought to piss. Theraport was ac- 
cepted and the ordinance was passed. 

Mr. Bryden of Ward Ei?ht, iron the Committee <>n 
Streets on the part of the Common Council, to whom 
was referred Hie subject of the boundary line between 
this city and Brookline, nude a report in which the\ 
state that the line is very irrsgular. It is proposed to 
straightsn the line by drawing it directly across to 
Charles river, from some point near where il makes a 
sudden bend to the eastward, in following the chan- 
nel of Muddy river. They therefor? report in favor 
of the order for a petition of the Legislature for 
straightening the line, and Ihe passage of an order 
for a committee of conference on the subject with the 
authorities of the town of Brookline. 

The report and orders in favor of the erection of a 
Police station house and Ward room on land in Ward 
Thirteen, at the corner of Palmer and short streets, 
at a cost of $10,000, and authorizing a loan to that 
amount to be appropriated therefor, was taken from 
the table. 

The question was taken on a report of the commit- 
tee for Iheir passage ill a new draft, and the orders 

failed of passage by a vote of 25 yeas to l ( .) nays, as 
follows, not two-thirds voting therefor: 

Feas— Carney, Flanders, Plynn, Harris, Jacobs, 
Jenks. Keith, Kingsbury, Knight, Malone, Minon, 
Morse, L. Bice, S. Rice,' Rockwell, Rogers, Ryan, 
Squires, Van Nostrand, Wells, Weston, .1. White, 
Wilson, Woollev. Young. 

Nays— Batchelder, Bean, Belknap, Bryden, Dar- 
row, l>"nnv, Dinsmore, Heywood, Hobbs, Nelson, 
Newton, Osborn, Parker, Pickering, Snow, Train, 
Tucker, Wadswortb, Wright. 

Mr. Keitli of Ward Fifteen called attention to the 
fact that in April last measures were taken lor the 
procuring of four tire alarm bells for Wards Thir- 
teen, Fourteen and Fifteen. He understood that all 
the preparations had been made for putting up the 
bells, but for some reason they had not been procur 'd. 
He therefore moved that, so much of the order of 
April 9 as authorized the Committee on Fire Alarms to 
procure said bells be rescinded, and that a committee 
be appointed to procure such bells, at an expense not 
exceeding $8000, to be charged to the appropriation 
for tire alarms. 

Mr. Darrow of Ward Eight moved that the order 
be laid over to the next meeting of the Couneil. to al- 
low him to look into the matter, for he understood 
that be was charged with bearing the brunt of the 
matter in not purchasing the bells. The order was 
laid over. 

()n motion ofMr. Osborn of Ward six it was order- 
ed that when the Council adjourn, (the next Thurs- 
day being Thanksgiving,) it adjourn for two weeks. 

Adjourned to Thursday evening, Dee. 3. 



Proceedings of Board of Aldermen, 



NOV. 23, 1SGS, 



The regular weekly meeting of the Board of Alder- 
men was held this afternoon, Mayor Shurtleff presid- 
ing. 

Four grand and three petit jurors were drawn for 
the IT. S. District Court. 

APPOINTMENTS CONFIRMED. 

Henry A. Marsh, as Constable. 
Stephen Moriarty, special police officer, without 
pay, for duty at the Phoenix Glass Works. 

PETITIONS PRESENTED AND REFERRED. 

Gen. Isaac S. Burrell, for a brigade headquarters in 
this city. Referred to Committee on Armories. 

Moses R. Wildes, for an apportionment of Bowker 
street betterment into three parts; also of Edward II. 
Ashcroft, for the same purpose. 

Thomas Conley, to be paid for damages caused by 
the extension of sixth street. 

Mary E. shute, to be compensated for damages to 
her estate and building on Oliver street. 

-V. T. Meserve and others, that Lawrence street be 
laid out and accepted. Severally referred to theCom- 
mitte on Streets. 

Boston & Providence Railroad Company, for dam- 
age-- for land taken for Stony Brook sewer; referred 
to Committee on Sewers. 

G. F. Cobb and others, for a crossing in Tremont 
street near Station street. Referred to Committee on 
Paving, wilh full powers. 

Micheal G. Minon and others, for a crosswalk in 
front of the NqrCross Schoolhouse. Referred to Com- 
mittee on Pavi.ig, with full powers. 

Sarah E. and Israel Huckins, to be compensated 
tor grade damages on Shawmut avenue. 

Pnebe Daniels, to be compensated for grade dama- 
ges on Shawmut avenue. 

Ann P. Buttrick, to be compensated for grade dam- 
ages in Richmond street. 

Severally referred to the Committee on Paving. 

Charles Cullis, for abatement of tax. 

Win. It. Frost, for abatement of tax. 

Severally referred to the Committee on Assessors' 
Department. 

Metropolitan Railroad Company, for a location in 
Washington street and Dock square, to connect with 
the tracks of the Middlesex Railroad Company in 
Union street. Referred to the Committee on Paving. 

D. W. O'Brien and others, that the proposed work 
of raising houses on Shawmut street be deferred till 
spring. Referred to Committee on Church Street 
District. 

Peter Dailey and others, for the placing and light- 
inn- of lamps on Lawrence street. Referred to Com- 
mittee on Lamps. 

COMMUNICATION'. 

A communication was received from Dr. William 
Read, City Physician, recommending the use of the 
Robbins Carbonized Wood for certain portions of the 
public buildings, particularly adapted for pavements, 
underground drains, fire-plug boxes, and everything 
where dampness accelerates the decay id' material. It 
has also the elfect of the most effective and cheapest 
sanitary agents, and will prove a storehouse from 
which is instantly sent forth a correcting and purifying 
influence, as lasting as the wood itself. Referred to 
Committee on Public Buildings. 

PUBLIC AMUSEMENTS. 
The following communication was read: 
To the Honorable Mayor mid City Council: 

Gentlemen: The undersigned citizens of Boston, 

having faith in cheerful recreation, for Ihe people, as 
promotive of good morals and civil order, ami grate- 
fully remembering the public concerts given on the 
Common, respectfully petition the City Goverment to 
secure the Music Hail for a free weekly concert, at 
which the people may enjoy the great organ. 

Besides the pleasure which this would give a large 
portion of our people, hitherto prevented from hear- 
ing the organ, we believe it would largely meet a nat- 
ural desire for social entertainment now sought in 
objectionable places, and by elevating the standard 
of musical taste, gradually wean many people from 
pastimes that lend to disorder and crime. 

The petition was signed by James L. Little. David 



58 



PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



Bears, George T. Bigelow, 8araucl Hooper, Nathaniel 
Thayer, and many other large taxpayers and leading 
citizens. 

Referred to Alderman Braman and While on the 
part Di' this board. 

NOTICES OF INTENTIONS rn BUILD. 

Henrj B. Stratton, F street, between Seventh and 
Eighth streets; James G. Tighe on Telegraph street, 
near Dorches ter street ; Ware & Van Brunt, Brim- 
mer street, corner of Mount Vernon Btreet; George 
Hargrave, Saratoga street, between Pntnam and 
Prescotl streets ; Edward O'Conner, Fifth street, be- 
tweeu P and Dorchester streets; c. Tilden, corner of 
Culvert and Tremont streete ; P. O'Brien, 561 Second 
street; Ware & Van Brunt, Brimmer street; Patrick 
Callahan, 30 Hamburg street; Samuel H. Holbrook, 
Trenton Btreet, between Brooks and Putnam streets; 
John R. Hall, 504, 506, 508 and 510 Washington street; 
severally referred to rtn- < 'ommittee on streets. 

EAST BOSTON FERVRY COMPANY. 

The hearing on the petition ofthe East Boston Ferry 
Company for raising the rates of tolls on their ferries 
was taken up by assignment. Hon. Francis K. Par- 
ker appeared for the Ferry Com] >any. After making 
some statements relative to the past action of the Board 
of Aldermen on the subject of Terries, ho said that in 
the \\ inter of 1866. after much discontent, the leading 
citizens of East Boston petitioned for a new terry 
company, on account of the insufficient accommoda- 
tions then afforded them. They were incorporated 

as the Citizens' Ferry Company. The opponents <>f 
the old corporation are now the corporation itself. 
The city, acting through its Ferry Committee, came 
to the conclusion that there should be no competing 
company, and the result was that on their recommen- 
dation, the city taking the initiative, the company 
bought the old ferry compan; and reorganized it as it 
is today. 

This company having acted upon the recommenda- 
tion ol the city, in reorganizing the company, in mak- 
ing repairs at an expense Of $140,000, and having pur- 
chased new boats, legal difficulties intervened, audit 
was uearly two years before the eity put the slips of 
the People's Kerry ( 'ompany into the hands of the new 
corporation. This corporation was obliged to issue 
bonds to the amount of $'X>, (too, and with a floating 
debt, of $50,000 it went into operation, and lost money 
the first year. With the operation of both ferries, it 
must be evident that at present rates the loss will be 
enormous the present year. 

Mr. Parker slated that estimating the purchase of 
the capital ofthe old company, which was $180,000 at 
80 Cents on the dollar, the cost and interest, the cost 
to them would lie 1 #14.">. 000; adding to this the issue 
of bonds and the floating debt, the amount would be 
$325,000 as the actual capital, upon which the com- 
pauy would claim its eight per rent, dividends. 

After examining the exhibit of the company for the 
last year, and the various items, he contended that 
instead of $140,000, which the receipts amounted to, 
they must amount to $208,000, or $70,000 more, to give 
the company the dividend which they are allowed by 
law. [n other words, they wish for an increase of 
tolls of fifty per cent. The rates of tolls were fixed 
in IS.Y.!, at gold prices, and as everything else has risen 
in price — coal, labor, ,S:e. — it is not unreasonable that 
Such an increase should take place, especially as, 
added (hereto, that the company is now running' two 
ferries instead of one. In making a comparison with 
the New York companies, he stated that one of these 
companies carries 95,000 persons a da--, or 730,000a 
year, five times as many as the Past Boston Kerry, 

and vol is obliged, With boats of about the same size, 

to charge a higher price. The last year of the war 
the dividends were but 6 per cent, on a capital of 

$800,000, w hen the rales were raised. 

Mr. Parker read various statements showing the 
daily travel and receipts of the New York companies 
and the navel and receipts of the East Boston Ferry 
Company. At the present rates of loll flu' receipts 
from 11,000 foot passengers are $220; 2000 horse rail- 
road passengers, $30; 750 one horse teams, ^7.">; -Jell 
two horse teams, $37 50; all other travel *sos;— 

making an aggregate of $370 58 as the daily receipts. 
At the proposed rates, the receipts will be $575 in the 
aggregate for the same number of passengers and 
team 8. This will give a daily average receipt for each 
boat Of $144, while on the boats ol the New York ami 
Brooklyn Ferry Company the average is $182, and on 
those ofthe I'nion Ferry Company it is $250. The 
company was ready at anj time to give up the ferry 
to any parties at it- cost. 



Having given these aatements, he contended that 
nothing more need be said. If it was desirable to 

have good ferric-, they must be de\ idend paying 
ferries, and to have them < li \ idend pav ing, the rati 
tolls must be raised. In fact, t\>f rates must be raised 
if it is desired to have any ferries at all. The parties 
did not wish DOr would they make threat-, but they 
could not lam the terries unless they could be made to 

pay. These gentlemen were ready to give up these 

iii rie-. in any persons who were ready to take them 
and run them. En conclusion, he said the Directors 

were present and ready to answer any questions 

Which member- of the I Jo ird'dc.-ired to a-k. 

Alderman Beaver, chairman of the Committee on 

Ferries, stated that there were, many personswho 
believed that by raising the rates of toils their inter- 
ests would sutler no less than those of the company, 
as contended under the present rates. He desired 
that they should have an opportunity to be heard. 

Alderman White said as there were 26,000 persons 
interested in thi> question they should be heard, and 

he moved that the further hearing be postponed to 

Monday, Dee. 7. 

On motion of Alderman Richards, it was ordered 
that the Committee on Ferries be instructed to engage 
a sufficient number of persons not connected with the 
Ferry Company, to make an accurate record ofthe 
daily travel by the East Boston Ferry Company's 
boats, for the period of eight days, to lie charged to 
the appropriation for incidental expenses. 

Alderman Talbot inquired if it was understood that 
the hearing on the part of petitioners was closed, as 

light was needed on that point, that the per-on- now 
constituting the Citizen's Kerry ("ompany came to the 
city stating that they could make money by the ferry, 
ana now complain that are losing many thousand 
dollar- a v ear. 

Mr. Parker said the company would be happy to 
furnish any information which might be desired of 
them. 

The Mayor stated that the usual course would be 
allowed of a right to close the hearing by petitioners. 

Alderman Sea ver said the Board, as was its custom, 
would be very liberal in the matter. 

The order for postponement was carried. 

UNFINISHED KUSINESS. 

The following orders were severally passed : 
Order directing the Superintendent of Streets to put 
down the Stafford pavement on the west and south 
sides of Court square, at an estimated expense of 
$8000. 

< >rder to grade Past Dedhani street with ashes, to be 
charged to Appropriation for Pavinsr, 

< irder to pay Eliza G. Townsend $1 loo for Tremont 
street land damages. 

Order to pay the proprietors ofthe Second Church 
$20,000, for land taken to open Avon place. 

Order to reset edgestones and repave gutters and 
sidewalks in Curve street betweet Hudson and Tyler 
streets, at a cost of slim. 

Orderto reset edgestones and repave gutters in East 
Newton street, between .Tames Street and Harrison 
avenue, at a cost of $350. 

Order to lay edgstones and gutters around House of 
Refuge in New land street at a Cost of $400. 

Order to lay sidewalks in Dudley street, between 
Warren street and Mount Pleasant avenue, at ex- 
pense of the abutters, and at a cost of $2500. 

UKOADAVAY EXTENSION. 

The resolve and order to extend Broadway from 
Federal to Albany street was t iken up. 

On motion of Alderman Messinger, the subject was 
referred to Monday next, 5 o'clock. 

WIDENING OF HANOVER STREET. 

The resolve and order to widen Hanover street, 
from Court street to F.laekst me Btreet, coming up, 
Alderman Messinger made a similar motion for post- 
ponement. 

Alderman Pratt could see no reason for postpone- 
ment, the subject having been under consideration for 
so long a time, and every member of the Board hav- 
ing made up his mind in relation to it. 

Alderman Messinger said he had but to reiterate 
what he had already -aid. that nothing would be gain- 
ed by action now, since the Common Council had ad- 
journed over, and as nothing would be obtained hy 
taking a vole immediately, the members ofthis Board 
would have, by delay, further time to fully consider 
the matter. 

Alderman Pratt further objected to postponement. 
Even if there was to be no gain in time, a- stated, the 



PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



59 



disposal of the business would take it out of the way 
of other business which might come up for considera- 
tion. 

Alter some remarks by Alderman Paul, in which he 
referred to the danger orhaste in important matters, 
the postponement was carried. 

COMMON COUNCIL PAPERS. 

Petitions from the Common Council were referred 
in concurrence. 

The ordinance regulating the use of streets for 
building purposes was laid on the table, on motion 
Of Alderman Woodman. 

Other papers and orders from the Common Council 
were concurrently acted upon. 

REPORTS OF COMMITTEES. 

Alderman White, from the Committee on Licenses, 
reported in favor of revoking the license of Thomas 

Lynch, a newsboy. Accepted. 

The same committee reported favorably on peti- 
tion of George Roche, to give a sparring exhibition; 
of W. H. Rumney, to give a dramatic exhibition at 
East Boston ; of several persons, for licenses to deal 
in second-hand articles, and of others as common vic- 
tuallers and as keepers of intelligence offices. Sev- 
erally accepted. 

Alderman Messinger, from the Committee on Health 
reported that leave be granted to Hobbs & Prescott 
to build a stable for more than four horses on Brook- 
line street, between Shawmut avenue and Tremont 
street, no person having objected (hereto. Accepted. 

Alderman James, from tbe Committee on Paving, 
reported an order directing the Superintendent of 
Streets to gravel the sidewalks on Baiubridge street. 
from Dale street to Walnut avenue, at an expense of 
$.300. Head twice and passed. 

The sinie Committee reported leave to withdraw 
on petition of Louis Prang for removal of tracks of 
the Metropolitan Railroad Co. on Washington street, 
near Gardner street. Accepted. 

The same Committee, on petition of S. A. Stetson 
and others for the removal of wooden buildings on 
Ferdinand street, reported reference to Committee on 
Church Street District; also (hat the Chief of Police 
grant a permit to John Rindge for the use of a por- 
tion of Tremont street for building purposes. Ac. 
cepted. 

Reports were made by the same Committee on vari- 
ous matters, with orders, which were read once; pro- 
viding for the pavement of Chandler street with small 
granite blocks; of Last street with theNicolson pave- 
ment, including many others. 

Alderman Talbot, from the Committee on streets, 
reported no action necessary on sundry notices of 
intention to build. 

Alderman Cobb, from the Committee on Claims, re- 
ported leave to withdraw on petition of Wm. C. Po- 
land, for use of dock in the South Lay, also on peti- 
tion of Thomas D. Paine, to be paid for injuries sus- 
tained in Orleans street. Severally accepted. 

ORDERS OF NOTICE. 

Alderman Talbot, from tbe Committee on Streets, 
reported orders of notice for hearings on the intention 
of this Board to lay out that portion of the Milldam 
making a part of Beacon street and included within 
the city limits, sixty feet in width, and that portion of 
the Milldam from' Clarendon street to the line of 
Lrookline, seventy feet in width, the hearings to be 
Dec. 8, at 4 P. M. 

The same committee reported an order of notice, 
which was adopted, for a hearing Dec. 7 of all par- 
lies interested in the assessment of betterments for 
the widening of Devonshire street. 

ORDERS PASSED. 

Order for tbe issue of the usual warrant to notify 
the citizens of the Municipal election on the 14th De- 
cember, the polls to be opened at 8 o'clock A. M., 
and to close at 4 P. M. 

Order to abate an assessment of $-21 23 on Bridget 
Corlan, in Orange court, f..r the construction of a 
sewer to abate a nuisance , by reason of inability to 
pay the same. 

Order that the Superintendent of Lamps, under the 
direction of the Committee on Lamps, cause lamps 
to be placed and lighted in Berkeley street, from Chand- 
ler to Providence street, at a cost of $1250, ami to be 
charged to the appropriation for lamps. 

Order that the Chief of Police bo directed to notify 
the owners and abutters on Chandler street, between 
Tremont ami Berkeley streets, to furnish edgestones 
to support their sidewalks, and lay their sidewalks 
with brick and their driveways with flat stones. 



Order that the Chief of Police be directed to notify 
the owners and abutters on Williams street, between 
Shawmut avenue and Washington street, to lay their 
sidewalks. 

Order that the Chief of Police be directed to notify 
the owners and abutters on Brimmer street, between 
Mount Vernon and Chestnut streets, to lay their side- 
walks. 

Order that the Slate Inspector of gas and gas meters 
be requested to examine and report to this Board 
once each month during the ensuing winter the con- 
dition of the gas manufactured by the Boston Gas 
Light Company, the South Boston, East Boston and 
Roxbury Gas Light Companies. 

Order that the Committee on Public Buildings be 
authorized to put on new radiators on the Lawrence 
schoolhouse, at an expense not exceeding $-2000, to 
be charged to the appropriation for Grammar schools. 
Public Buildings. 

Order that the Superintendent of streets be direct- 
ed to serve an order of notice to quit on the heirs of 
Jonathan Patton over the line of widening of Eliot 
street. 

Order to lay out as public street Kendall street, 
between shawmut avenue and Tremont street, thirty- 
two feet in width. 

Order assessing betterments on estates benefited 
by the extension of Brimmer street, to the amount of 
$28,457 13. 

Order for the abatement of certain nuisances. 

The following order was offered : 

Ordered, That hereafter all ashes collected by the 
Health Department- shall be used in tilling public 
streets or land belonging to the Citv of Boston, un- 
less by special order of this Board the Superinten- 
dent is authorized to sell tbe same to private par- 
ties, or to be disposed of in some other way, and iu all 
cases there shall be charged for said ashes a sum not 
less than fifty cents per load. 

Alderman Cobb advocated the order, and its pas- 
sage at once. 

Alderman Mo-singer wished it referred to the Com- 
mittee on Health, as the proper disposal of it, and 
stated the usual practice in relation to the disposal 
of ashes. It had been intimated, he said, that certain 
gentlemen of the Board wore interested in the grading 
up of land bought of the city, but of that he had no 
knowledge. 

Alderman Paul said ho had bought lands of the citv, 
on Albany street, and while if cost $1 75 for gravel to 
make that street passable, the city was selling its 
ashes at 25 cents a load. 

The motion to refer to the Committee on Health 
was lost, when the order was passed, by a vote of 11 
to 1 — Alderman Woodman in the negative. 

The following rule was passed, on motion of Aid. 
Richards. 

Whereas, Levi Gaylord, acting as a member of the 
Fire Department, and attached to Hose Company No. 
5, was seriously injured at a fire on the 4th of Nov- 
ember, while in the discharge of his duty. 

Ordered, That there be allowed and paid to Levi 
Gaylord the sum of $150 on account of injuries re. 
ceived while in the discharge of his duty as a member 
of the Fire Department, said sum to be charged to the 
Appropriation for Fire Department. 

DEVONSHIRE STREET WIDENING. 

Alderman Talbot, from the Committee on Streets, 
reported a schedule of the estimate of damages oc- 
casioned by the widening of Devonshire street be- 
tween Milk and State streets, which was adopted. 
The number of feet of land taken is 10,657, at prices 
per foot ranging from $15 to $55. The whole amount 
in value is $287,102. The value of buildings before 
widening was $177,270, and after the widening, is 
$112,100. Damages to buildings, owners and oceu- 
pants, $104,135, making a total of damages to all the 
estates of $391,237. 

Alderman Talbot, from the Committee on Streets, 
submitted in print city document No. 128, il being the 
report of the ( lommittee on Laying Out and Widening 
Streets on the proposed Marginal street from Rowe's 
wharf to Commercial street, at Eastern avenue. The 
report was laid on the table. 

Adjourned. 



NOTE. In the remarks on the subject of laying out 
Berkeley street, at the meeting of the Board last 
week, Alderman Messinger wishes it to be understood 

tint he did not say that the State could not grant in ore 
than sixty foot, but thai the Commissioners could not 
do so. The State may do so, through the Governor 
and Council. 



60 



PROCEEDINGS OF OITY COTTNCIL. 



Proceedings of Board of Aldermen, 

MOV. 27, 1868. 



\ special meeting of the Board w;is held ;d one 
o'clock this afternoon, Mayor Shurtleff in tbe chair. 

Alderman Cobb offered an order, stating thai it was 
necessary to provide for a committee to tender the 
hospitalities of the city to General Grant immediately, 
and before concurrent action could be had on the 
measure. The following is the order, which was 
unanimously adopted : 

Ordered, That His Honor the Mayor and the Pres- 
ident of the Common ( louncil, with such members of 
the Board of Aldermen and of the Common Council 
as they may designate, constitute a committee to ten- 
der the hospitalities of the city to Gen. V. 6. Grant 
during his visit to Boston. 

Adjourned. 



Proceedings of Board of Aldermen, 



MOV. 30, 1868. 



The regular weekly meeting' of the Board of Alder- 
men was held this afternoon, Mayor Shurtleff presid 
ing. 

APPOINTMENTS CONFIRMED. 

D. J. Collins, as Constable. 

FIRM DEPARTMENT. 

The nomination of Gilbert S. May, as a member of 
Hook and Ladder Co. No. 4, was confirmed. 

PETITIONS PRESENTED AND REFERRED. 

Frederick Smith, for a division of the apportion- 
ment of betterment on estate in Bowker street. Re- 
ferred to the Committee on Streets. 

James Leeds anil others, for crosswalks in Beacon 
street, at Clarendon and Dartmouth streets. Referred 
to the Committee on Paving, with full powers. 

Alonzo Farrar & Co., for leave to lay a pipe under 
Chelsea and Bremen streets to their factory. Re- 
ferred to the Committee on Paving. 

John C. Gray, Jr., for abatement of tax for 18(57. 
Referred to the Committee on Assessors' Department. 

Wm. Carter & Co., for leave to lay an iron pipe un- 
der Bremen and Chelsea streets, opposite their fac- 
tory. Referred to the Committee on Paving-. 

James B. Dow, that East Chester park be paved. 
Referred to Committee on paving. 

James Gilbert, to be compensated for personal in- 
.juries received for an alleged defect in Water street. 
Referred to Committee on Claims. 

Patrick J. Clark, for leave to place a bulkhead at 
02 Merrimac street. Referred to Committee on Pav- 
ing 1 . 

Joseph Foye and others, that Federal street in Wash- 
ington Village be paved. Referred to Committee on 
paving. 

Wm.B. Mendum and others, that Colony street be 
extended to Sixth street. Referred to Committee on 
Street-. 

Thomas Conley, that his claim against the city for 
sixth street damages be referred to arbitration. Re- 
ferred to Committee on Streets. 

Free Church of St. Mary's, for abatement Of assess 
ment of betterment on their estate in Richmond street. 
Referred to Committee on streets. 

Margaret Sullivan, administratrix, to be paid for 
leasehold damages to estate taken by the city on High 
street. Referred to Committee on Streets. 

Lon Morris, for leave to build a brick stable for 
more than four horses on Brookline street, between 
Shawmut avenue and Tremont street. Referred to 
Committee on Health, 

John W. Olmstead and others, to be relieved 
from damage caused by surface water from a passage 



way in rear of Worcester square. Referred to Com- 

niitlee on l*a\ ing. 

Wm. J. R. Evans, Calvin A. Richards and others, 
that the city request the passage by the Legislature 
of an act authorizing the extension of Easl Chester 
park with solid filling over the Roxbury canal, there- 
by making a connection with the proposed new aven- 
ue from the Highland- to South Boston, aero-- the 

South Bay. Referred to Committee on Streets. 

REPORT or TRUSTEES <)!•' II BXJK3 LIBRARY. 

The Sixteenth Annual Report of the Trustees of the 

Public Library was presented, and laid on the table, 
and it was ordered thai 2000 copies of it be printed. 

NOTICES OF INTENTIONS TO BUILD. 

Martin Mullin, on Federal street, between Fourth 
and Fifth street-; Gustavus O. Alden, Dudley street, 
near Grove Hall avenue ; Ivory Emmons, 245, -247, 249 
Tremont -Ireet ; Wm Phillips, Marginal street, near 
Cottage street: Henry Whitw ell. Beacon street, be- 
tween Berkeley and Clarendon streets : Leonard Pick- 
ering, Bremen street, between Decatur and Maverick 
streets. Severally referred to the Committee on 

Streets. 



COMMUNICATION FROM Tin; WATER BOARD. 

A communication was received from the Cochitnate 
Water Board, in print, asking for an additional ap- 
propriation for Wards Thirteen, Fourteen ami Fif- 
teen. The Board state that they have Dearly exhaus- 
ted the appropriation of $200,000, made in April last, 
for laying pipes in Wards Thirteen, Fourteen and 
Fifteen, and ask for an additional sum of $250,000 for 
the same object. They have laid already nearly 6 miles 
of pipes, including those of the largest size necessary 
for that section, and the work is >till progressing, was 
will be continued until the 1st January, unless the 
weather stops the operations. The additional appro- 
priation asked tor at this season of the year is for the 
pip-pose of making' the contracts for the pipes and 
other materials required next year so that the work 
of laying them can he commenced early in the spring, 
and the work may be done before another winter. 
It is proposed to adopt the stand-pipe system for the 
high service, and the location of this will he on the old 
estate owned by the city and known as the Old Fort. 

The Board say in conclusion : 

According to the above figures of the city Engineer, 
it will require sixteen miles of pipe to be laid next 
year to complete this section, and as contracts can 
iiow be made on very favorable terms, all the iron 
works being- desirous of winter work, and although 
iron has risen several dollars per ton since our last 
contract, we have offers to furnish pipe at a loss price, 
if contracted for now. and from the best information 
that we can obtain, there will be a very large amount of 
pipe to be cast in the spring for the various water- 
works throughout the country. 

Believing as we do, that it is decidedly for the in- 
terest of the city that these contracts should be made 
at once, we ask' that this communication will receive 
your early and prompt attention. 

The communication was referred to the Committee 
on Water. 

UNFINISHED BUSINESS. 

The following orders, as unfinished business, were 
taken up and passed : 

Order directing the Superintendent of Streets to 
grade Broadway and Q sired, near their junction, 
at a cost of s300'- 

Order to grade and gravel a portion of Culvert 
street, between Tremont and Cabot streets, at cost 
Of $1600. 

Order to repave East street, from south street to 
Federal street, with Nicolson pavement, at a cost of 
$5500. 

Order to grade and pave Chandler street, from Tre- 
mont street to Berkeley street at a cost of S11.000. 

Order to pay William R. Howe :?11(>0 for grade 
damages at No's. 551 and 553 Shawmut avenue. 

Order to pay Calvin ('. Bailey $620 for grade dama- 
ges at No. 40 Buggies street. 

Order to lav cross-walks on Shawmut avenue at 
Union Park, at a cost of $320. 

Order to pave portions of Northampton and Hamp- 
den streets, from Harrison avenue to Yeoman street, 
at a co-f of $16,000. 

Order to set edgestones, pave gutters, and gravel 
Brimmer street, at a cost or$1300. 

Order to purchase fifty iron lamp posts, at a cost of 
$1000. 

Order to purchase gas and fluid street lanterns, at 
a cost of SS0II. 



PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



61 



HEARINGS OX ORDER OF NOTICE. 

The petition ofthe Metropolitan Railroad Company, 
for an additional track from Common l<> Boylston 
street, and for a track from Dudley to Adams street, 
came up on an order of notice for a hearing of parties 
interested. No person appearing, the petition was 
recommitted. 

REPORTS OF COMMITTEES. 

Alderman, Paul from the Committee on Sewers, re- 
ported leave to withdraw on petition of Wilder, Beals 
and others, for a sewer m Cabot street. Accepted. 

Also, leave to withdraw on petition of Martin Beatty 
and others, for a sewer on Weston street, west of Tre- 
mont street. Accepted. 

Alderman White, from the Committee on Licenses, 
reported in favor of petition of George Booke, for 
leave to give a sparring exhibition* Accepted. 

Alderman White also reported in favor of granting 
certain licenses to newsboys, to common victuallers, 
Innholders, &c. Allot' which were accepted. 

Alderman James, from the Committee on Public. 
lands, reported leave to withdraw on petition of the 
Boston Water Power Company for an exchange of 
lands with the city on Northampton street, no action 
being necessary. Accepted. 

Also, leave to withdraw on petition of I). S. Johnson 
for modification of conditions of sale of land on Tre- 
mont street. Accepted. 

Alderman Talbot, from the Committee on Streets, 
reported no action necessary in certain notices of in- 
tention to build. Accepted. 

Alderman Talbot, from the same Committee, re- 
ported the following orders, which were read twice 
and passed. 

Order to pay Jeremiah Fogerty, guardian $2560 for 
land taken and damages in the widening of Federal 

street . 

Order t<> pay Wm. W. store $11,250 for land taken 
and damages in the widening of Tremont street. 

Order, to pay John Leukhardt $12,000 for land taken 
in the wideuing of Tremont street. 

Order to pay Patrick Kelly $3011 24 for land taken 
and damages in cutting through Oliver street. 

Alderman B ram an, from the Committee on Armo- 
ries, reported an order, which was p issed, to pay the 
officers of the First Brigade M. V. M. $300 for fitting 
up a headquarters for tie Brig ide. 

Alderman Talbot, from the Committee on Streets, 
reported the estimate of damages in the widening of 
Matthews street, amounting to $11.41-2. 

Alderman Talbot, from the ( 'ommitlee on the Assess- 
ors' Department, on the petition of C. M. Ellis for re- 
funding of tax, reported that taxes were erroneously 
assessed to him upon property conveyed to others, 
for the years 1864 to 1867, and recommending that the 
same be refunded and the assessment.-] be mhde upon 
(lie real owners, in accordance with provisions of 
Chapter 11, Section "):s. General statutes. Accepted. 

The same committee reported leave to withdraw on 
petition of George C. Shepard, Executor, for refund- 
ing of taxes. Accepted. 

Alderman Richards, from the Committee on Public 
Buildings, reported an order, which was passed, au- 
thorizing the payment of bills of Chamberlain & Mar- 
8 ton, contractors for the construction of bell towers at 
the Boston Highlands, in the usual manner, after hav- 
ing been approved. 

Alderman James, from the Committee on Paving, 
reported in favor of an additional appropriation of 
$11,000 to complete the work of raising and grading 
sh.awmut avenue and Ruggles street. An order au- 
thorizing the Treasurer to borrow $11,000 for that 
purpose, was passed. 

ORDERS OF NOTICE. 

On petition of J. P. Keating, for leave to use a steam 
engine and boiler at lid Portland street. Hearing at 
4 P. M., Dec. -21. 

On petition of Metropolitan Railroad Company, for 
a location in Dock Square. Hearing 4 P. M., Dec. 21. 

On oiiler to lay out Commonwealth avenue, from 
Berkeley to Clarendon streets. Hearing 4 P. M., Dec. 
14. 

On order for a discontinuance of a portion of Wash- 
ington street, southerly side, adjoining estate of Bosa 
Prang, corner of Gardner street. Hearing 4 P. M., 
Dec. 14. 

On order for the widening of Gardner street, easter- 
ly side, at the corner of Washington street. Hearing 
4 P. M., Dec. 14. 

Order for the widening of Walnut avenue, easterly 
side, between Rockland street and Buena Vista aven- 
ue. Hearing 4 P. M., Dec. 14. 



Order on assessing betterments for widening of 
Matthews street. Hearing 4 P. M., Dee, 14. 

ORDERS PASSED. 

Order to establish the grade of Kendall street iu 
accordance with plans in the office of the City Sur- 
veyor. 

Order to pay bills of certain persons connected di- 
rectly or indirectly with the city goverment. 

Order to abate certain nuisances specified. 

Order authorizing the Committee on Sewers to sell, 
and the Mayor to convey to Bridget Burke, 250 square 
feet of land, between the Stony Brook sewer and the 
land of said Burke. 

Order directing the Superintendent of Streets to 
grade Kendall street with ashes, between Shawmut 
avenue and Tremont street. 

Order that the Chief of Police notify the owner of a 
fence inclosing land S3 by 4 feet, encroaching upon 
Appleton street, to remove the same in ten days, and 
in default, that the Superintendent of Streets remove 
the same at the expense ofthe owner. 

Order that the Committee on Public Lands be au- 
thorized to set apart a lot of land belonging to the city 
on .North Grove street, forty feet in width, tor the use 
ofthe Sewer Department, to replace a lot taken for a 
hose house. 

On motion of Alderman Richards it was ordered 
that the Committee on Public, Buildings be authorized, 
with the approval of the Mayor, to negotiate for the 
sale ofthe County Court House tf- any responsible 
and accredited parties, upon the best terms which 
can be obtained therefor, and to report to the City- 
Council for final action, and the terms of anv which 
they think it best for the city to accept, and also the 
period at which the occupancy ofthe building by the 
several courts must cease. 

Alderman Richards stated in support of the order 
that certain responsible parties were ready to make 
an offer, and it was desirable to acertain what terms 
could be obtained. 

The ordinance relating to the occupation of streets 
for building purposes was taken from the table and 
passed in concurrence. 

On motion of Alderman Messinger, the report and 
order respecting the removal ofthe Criminal Court to 
the jail yard was taken from the table and referred to 
the next Board of Aldermen. 

WIDENING OF HANOVER STREET. 

The order for the widening of Hanover street, from 
Court street to Blackstone street, at an expense of 
$500,000, and for the borrowing ofthe mone\ therefor, 
was taken up as a special assignment. 

Alderman Talbot, of the committee, stated that the 
orders were reported in fulfilment ofthe instructions 
ot the Board, and he 1 did not know the views of the 
committee on the subject. The report contained no 
recommendation in regard to the matter. If the city 
was about to lay out its streets anew, it could not be 
doubted that such a street should be laid out sixty 
feet in width; and now the only question was regard- 
ing the expense and the amount to be returned to the 
treasury in the way of betterments. 

Alderman Paul said the chairman ofthe committee 
bad stated the matter fairly in relation to the expres- 
sion of the views to the' committee. The expense 
would no doubt be great, yet the improvement must 
be made at some time, and any delay would but in- 
crease that expense. There will always be some per- 
sons to complain of expense of widening streets, and 
if such persons were heeded there would be no im- 
provements made. 

Alderman Pratt said he believed the subject bad 
been exhausted, and it would not be necessary to say 
much in favor of it. There was a prevalent impres- 
sion, which he believed erroneous, that the City 
Council was elected for the purpose of saving money 
to the city ; but it was no purpose in the election of 
the City Goverment simply to save money nor to 
make money, but to see that necessary appropriations 
were judiciously expended. It could not lie doubted 
that the interests ofthe city required a wider avenue 
at the North End ofthe city, and that Hanover street 
should be widened its whole length, from Court street 
to Chelsea ferry. 

The question was then taken, and the order was 
passed by a unanimous vote, every Alderman being 
present. 

EXTENSION OF BROADWAY. 

The resolve for the extension of Broadway, from 
Federal street to Albany, with the orders connected 
therewith, were considered. 






IE] >] hS < >F ( JITY CO! X< !IL. 



.11 of 

iu th ■ flgui r- of the two 

man T exp mse of cs • 

treet, in land damages, wih estimated 

1 1 tetfO.ODO, nn<l th or It r authorizing the Treasurer t<> 

leu for the land il images and 

trui'tion, including all now ssary 

oriduea ami stru tures. In i > i - . sin the otherc 

be did not know tlie opinions of the < nnittee. 

Alderman Messinger said he did not rise to oppose 
the orders. If there had lieen a horse railroad over 
Dover Str el Bridge, and other contemplated improve- 
ments had been carri id <uit, he might not have vot sd 
lor this projeet ; but belie* ing that the people of South 
Boston had not sufficient accommodation, be should 
vote for the ext msion. 

Alderman Paul said be had lived in hopes that the 
Eastern avenue would be built, as conl :m plated ; but 
a- that bad been deferred, some relief should be given 
t<> the people of that section of the city. The widen- 
ing of Federal strcel would not give the relief needed, 
being required for the benefit of the present travel 
alone. 

The orders were passed by an unanimous vote. 

On motion of Alderman Richards, tbe order (being 
the salaries of the Church Street Commissioners wae 

taken up. 

In support of the order, lie said that the work had 
progressed much fester than was anticipated, and 
had required the time <>t' all the Commissioners, 
whereas, it was supposed in fixing the salaries origi- 
nally, that the time of hut one would he occupied all 
the time. 

Alderman Paul admitted that the salaries were 
small, fixed before the Commissioners were elected, 
and that they should be raised next year. By their 
energy the work would he clone a year sooner then 
expected. 

Alderman Braman concurred in the remark that 
the salaries were small, hut moved a referrenoe to 
the next ( ity ('mini il. which was carried. 

On motion of Alderman Talbot, the order to assign 
rooms in I lie ( entral Charity Bureau to certain Chari- 
table societies was taken from the table. 

On consultation with Ex-Mayor Lincoln and other 
members of the Board Ol Overseers of the Poor, they 
expressed satisfaction in the proposed amendment, 
as aiding then in their duties in assigning rooms. 

The amendment of the Council was concurred in, 
and the order as amended was passed. 

NEW MARGINAL BTHEET. 

The report of the Committee on Laying out Street-; 
on the proposed Marginal street was taken up for 
consideration. 

Alderman Braman addressed the Board in favor 
of the pr »posed street, as follows : 

Jrr. Mayor: The Board during this year have given 
much iim'- and thought to tin- proposed Marginal 
Stn et. I think the able and full ri port of your com- 
mit ti e proves conclusively that t'd- street should and 
ought t ■ lie lmilt : and that the cost of if- construction 
can he, t i a verv large extent, properly and rightful lv 
essed upon the abutters. It was to* he hoped and 

pect d that so important an undertaking would 
have rec ived the aid and support of the owners of 
wh. ■ r\ is and docks over which this street will pass'; 
but of the eight corporations, all but two, viz., the 
M r ai til" and India Wharf corporations, apparently 
oppose the project, claiming that it will be n serious 
pecuni ry injury to th. ir property. 

< ommittee, of course, very naturally, do not 
wish i" place the city in antagonism t i these owner-. 

It would not be \\ Ise, except, alter a most thorou ^h 
and mature consideration of the whole subject, using 
ment and thai of parties reliable and impar- 
tial in i r\ way. If we are convinced that the views 
of the owners ar i erroneous, that it i- tbe usual con- 
ism of capital averse to a change of investment, 
then to us, sir, belongs the responsibility of doing 
that whi h the best interests of the city require. 

Objection to pal lie improvements by property ow- 
ners i- a chronic complain! and is always to In' ex- 
pected by this Board. I can scarcely recall any irreat 
improvement that wu have carried forward which has 
not been met w 1th determined opposition, — oftentimes 
by the parties w ho have reaped now the greatest bene- 
fits, [nave been told in thi- case th.it some of the 
largest owners of stock in these corporations oppose 
this improvement a- stockholders, hut. as individuals, 
are strongly in favor of it. Central wharf, not owning 
the dock next India wharf, would he naturally against 



this scheme, but if the property next to India wharf 
and India wharf are ''enented, of course it will the 
more largely pay. I understand that between other 
wharf property," certain tines, it i- claimed, ought to he 
settled and so on. It i- \ ery evident, if we are to wait, 
for an entire harmony on "the part of the property 
owner . the street will never he built. 

What will be the cost? Will it pay? Tour committee 
.-ay in their report, based upon the most careful plans 
and estimate-, including land damages, n taining wall, 
filling, gravel and paving, that the cost of the pro- 
posed street will not exceed the sum of $1,300,000, 
and that the betterments from the enhanced value of 
private property resnlting from this laying out will 
amount to $2,100,000, a balance Of $9 10,0 >■>. I have no 
doubt these estimates are correct: they have been 
made by sound, judicious men. having no wish on in- 
terests in the matter, and they are willing to -take 
their reputation upon the results. 

Looking at it in this lurht alone, viz: financially, 
will it not be a success? If it was an operation ex- 
tended to an cut uprising capitalist, i- there any donbt 
of his seizing the opportunity offered? But there are 
other reasons. 

First. The increased valuation of the property for 
future taxation by the City of Bo-ton. The reclaimed 
area available immediately for building purposes is 
in the neighborhood, in round numbers, of 350,000 feel . 
If hut an'' hundred and fifty .-tores and warehouses are 
built upon this property at an average value of $2 1,000 
each, it will give you a valuation of land and property 
amounting to $4,000,000. Is tin-re any donbt of the 
want of this store property, and will it command good 
tenant-!' 

In Portland there is just such a treet {for thi- is no 
new thing, no experiment to be tried;, with a double 
railroad track laid in its centre and side track- run- 
ning to the wharves; and I was assured, in a recent 
visit to that city, that the street was everything to the 
prosperity of Portland, and that store- and warehouses 
in it- vicinity command the best tenants in the city. 

Second. It will relieve the crowded central streets 
of Boston. 

The Marginal Freight Railroad, unless this street 
is built, must pass through Commercial street, now 
at almost all times of the day tilled to it- utmo-t capac- 
ity with vehicles. The passage of the cars will -till 
more obstruct this overcrowded thoroughfare; there 
can certainly he no opportunity there for a car to un- 
load, and Other street- are in t'ie -ame condition. Our 
central -treet- today are filled— and never more -.., 
I am happy to -ay, than at present— with truck- and 
wagons seeking the different depots, warehouses, &c. 
Blocks occur, transportation of merchandise i- de- 
layed: then comes the necessity of widening street-, 
which i< pressing today upon us from in all directions. 

The wants of our eity demand quick and easy car- 
riage. All delays add' to eo-t and are an additional 
obstruction to trade. 

Third. It will aid our railroad interests. Our rail- 
road lines all need this street. It different freight 
depot- are established upon the wharves, with >ide 
tracks, then without confusion and at comparatively 
small expanse, freight from the northern line- can be 
re-hipped by the western and southern. 

Elevators and warehouses at deep water will he 
built w here car- can he loaded and discharged under 
cover, giving every facility to commerce and trade. 
We shall thus save the distance between depot-: we 
shall have storehouses at hand, reducing the distance 
and expense of transportation very materially. 

Fourth. It will abate a nuisance now existing at the 
upper end of some of our docks, and will enable us to 
carry our drainage to deep water. 

Fifth. It will enable us to do something with Fort 
Hill. Your Committee say ••that the only place where 
the material from Fort Hiil can he deposited, except 
at an immense cost, i- the one embraced in this pro. 
posed improvement." By the removal of thi- materi- 
al then, that area(now comparatively of Mule value] 
comprising more than 600,000 feet, will be available 
for building purposes. 

Now -hall thi- improvement, which will so largely 
add to our taxable property, which will eo-t the city 
hut a comparatively small amount of money, fail or he 
postponed? 1 do not believe it will tail. It will, from 
the great advantage ottered, he carried forward: if 
not now, at some future time. I am ready to assume 
the responsibility now; for I think there is no time 
like the present. 

We are living in an age of progress. We want 
room to expand. The Bo-ton of today is not the Bos- 
ton of thirty years since. We have within a radius of 



PROCEEDIlNrOS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



63 



five miles a population of nearly five hundred thousand 
souls. Their interests are oura; they are away at 
night, but during the day tiny are with us; they use 
and occupy our streets. 

We can't stand still. We must develop our resour- 
ces of all kinds. We have been prospered as a man- 
ufacturing people. Perhaps that interest some day 
may sutler. It would be wise to cultivate our com- 
merce. We have one of the liest harbors on the coast, 
one daj nearer Europe by steam than New York, 
With the coal mines of Nova .Scotia almost at out- 
doors. 

We can underbid our great rival in the race of 
ocean navigation. We ought to be the bonded ware- 
house of tiie West. In a few short months the Union 
Pacific and Central Pacific will have joined hands and 
been completed ; and we shall be connected by rail 
with San Francisco. 

Magnificent steamers are now running from that 
port to China and Japan. By these steamers the wares 
and fabrics of Asia will be landed at San Francisco, 
carried by our continuous railroads to the Atlantic 
coast ami conveyed to the ports of Europe in less time 
and with greater security than by other routes. Of 
this trade Boston, if she will, may have her full share. 

Let our railroads seize the opportunity, furnish am- 
ple and cheap facilities for through freights, remem- 
bering that cheap transportation is life to our com- 
mercial hit 'rests ; that we look to them for a, liberal 
policy; that successful steamship lines may be estab- 
lished from our city to the ports of Europe, in con- 
tinuation of their own roads, one in harmony of in- 
terest and success. 

Let US, on our part, by wise and liberal legislation, 
pledge our cooperation with tin' railroads to furnish 
them, as far as lies in our power, the necessary fac- 
ilities for business, and as one ol the necessities of the 
day, 1 consider this Mivct musl be built, ami that the 
time has come now to at once inaugarate this great 
improvement. 

Alter talking with Mr. Quincy, Mr. Rose and 
Others, since writing hi-- views down. Alderman Bra- 
man added that he wes more convinced of the views 
which he had entertained. But for the purpose of 
giving members of the Board more time for consider- 
ation of the subject, he would move its assignment 
to Monday next, 5 o'clock. 

Alderman Paul said the ground had been so well 
covered bj the Alderman who had ju-t spoken, that 
nothing mora need be said. He deemed this im- 
provement of more importance than any measure of 
the City Government for some years past. By the 
plan proposed, but twenty-five stores would be re- 
moved, an I some of these were of but little value. 
N.i other line of a proposed improvement of like 
extent in any part of the city could be laid out with- 
out destroying five times as much property. A por. 
tion of this property was taxed but si 25 per foot, 
and with impro\ ements the value woald be iiicreast d 

to $ 13. A portion ol' the dork would be cut oil', but 
only that which was now a nuisance, and the loss of 
it was not to be considered in comparison with the 
gain which would result while the improvements on 
the South Boston Hats would give much more than 
this loss. 

Some gentlenem had objected to this scheme as that 
of Mr. Quincy, but if the City had had more of the 
scheme of the Quinces it would have been much 
better Off. Their monuments were to be found all 
over the city. This project he considered second to 
none which had been contemplated for the benefit of 
the city. The opposition that was made was by those 
who oppose all improvements. There were those who 
had made fortunes and seemed to believe that no 
more were to be made, and it we were to wait for 
them to ask to have this carried out, we shold wait 
until the trumpet of Gabriel sounded. The city had 
an elephant on its hands, in the shape of Fort Hill 
to be disposed of, and by means of the earth from 
that hill, the improvement can be carried out one 
quarter less than from any other source. In the 
hilling of the South Boston flats, this earth would not 
be needed and every load that is carried elsewhere 
from Fort Will costs five times as much as it would 
should it bi' thrown into the dock. 

Alderman Paul further argued in favor of doing 
the work at once, believing that favorable contracts 
could be made, and that the work could readily 
he done in winter, while there was a large number of 
laborers idle, who would thereby obtain employment 
and a living. The work would enrich the city." And 
the sooner it was done the sooner would it add 
valuable property for taxation. As a means of 



transportation of freight by facilities for a freight 
railroad, he considered the matter to be of great 
importance .also. 

Alderman Pratt concurred in the importance of 
the measure, and hoped that such an amendment 
would be made as would connect the proposed 
avenue with Prince street, and thus secure a direct 
communication to Charlestown through this avenue. 

The motion to assign to Monday next, 5 o'clock was 
carried. 

Adjourned. 



Proceedings of the Common Council, 



DEC. 4, 18GS. 



A special meeting of the Common Council was 
held this evening, Charles II. Allen, President, in 
the chair. 

The President read the notice of the Mayor calling 
the meeting, on account of the importance of the bus- 
iness requiring action. 

PAPERS FROM J Hi: BOARD OK ALDERMEX. 

Petitions from the Board of Alderman were referred 
in concurrence. 

The petition of James L. Little and others, for free 
Concerts in Music Hall, was refined in concurrence 
toa Special Committee, consisting on the part of the 
Common Council of Messrs. Harris of Ward Eleven, 
Morse of Ward Thirteen, and Train of Ward Three. 

The communication from the City Physician, re- 
commending the use of Bobbin's Carbonized Wood 
for certain portions of the Public Buildings, was re 
ferred in concurrence to the Committee on Public 
Buildings. 

The request from the Water Board for an addition- 
al appropriation Of $-250,000 for Wards Thirteen. Four- 
teen and Fifteen, City Document 131, 1866, was referred 
in concurrence. 

The sever ft] reports leave to withdraw on the peti- 
tion of the Boston Water Power Company respecting 
a change of land for the City's land, West of Northamp- 
ton street. 

On the petition of Thomas 1). Paine, to be compen- 
sated for pi rsonal injuries sustained from an alleged 
defect in Orleans street. 

On the petition of Mr. ('. Poland, to be compensated 
for the use of his dock in South bay. 

On the petition of I), s. Johnson, for a modification 
of conditions of sale of land on Ticmonl street. 

On the petition of George C. Shepard, Executor, 
that certain taxes erroneously paid ma}' be refunded, 
— were accepted in concurrence. 

The report in favor of petition of C. M. Ellis and 
others, Trustees, that certain taxes erroneously paid 
be refunded ; and reference to the next City Council 
of Order concerning the salaries of the Commission- 
ers On Church Street District, were also accepted. 

The order to pay bills of certain persons connected 
directly or indirectly with the Lily Goverment was 
ordered to a second reading. 

ORDERS PASSED IX COKCtTBRENCB. 

Order to set apart a lot on North Grove street for 

Sewer Department. 

Order to pay bill of Chamberlain and Marston for 
building the bell towers in Boston Highlands. 

Order authorizing sale and conveyance to Bridget 
Burke, of a lot lying between stony' Brook Sewer ami 
land of said Burke. 

Order authorizing a record to be made of the trav- 
el on the East Boston Ferry Company's boats, for 
not less than eight days. 

Order to pay Levi (Jaybird one hundred and fifty 
dollars for injuries received while acting as a mem- 
ber of the Fire Department. 

Order authorizing the Committee on Public Buil- 
dings, with the approval of the Mayor, to negotiate 
for the sale of the County Court House ; said commit- 
tee to report tor final action to the ( ily ( ouncil. 

The order for a loan of $11,000 to be added to the a- 
mount heretofore appropriated for raising the grade 
of shawmr.t avenue and Buggies street was read 
once. 



G4r 



PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



HANOI 11: ^i 1:1 I I \M> BEO u>w o . 

The resolve and orflera for widening ll mover street, 
and for a loan of $300,000 to be appropriated therefor, 
and resolve and order for the extension of Broadway, 
and for a loan of $550,000 to be appropriated therefor, 
were severally referred to the Committee <>n Streets 
on tlR' part of the Common Council. 

UNFINISHED BUSINESS. 

The orders to rescind order of April 9th, eoncernlng 
Alarm Bells for Wards 13, 14 and l">, and appointing 
a joint special committee to purchase and place lire 
alarm bells in said wards, al an expense noi exceed- 
ing eight thousand dollars, was taken up. 

Mr, Keith of Ward Fifteen said his only purpose in 
offering the order was to foward the matter, and as 
measures had been taken to put the bells in place, 
he moved that the order be laid on the table. Car- 
ried. 

Order authorizing alterations in the buildings op 
Dorchester and Fourth streets, for the accommodation 
of a hook and ladder carriage, and horses, and appa- 
ratus connected therewith, was considered. 

Mr. Darrow of Ward Eight advocated the order as 
having been before the Committee on Public Build- 
ings, and the room being a splendid one, and adapted 
for the purpose proposed, for which it was built, the 
alterations should be made. The room in the second 
story would answer all the purposes for a ward room 
as good as any in the citv. 

Mr. Van N'ostrand of Ward Twelve asked if it was 
the intention to take the present ward room. 

Mr. Darrow said he did nor know what he called 
the ward room, [t was not designed to have a ward 
room in the lower story, but there could be one of the 
liest ward rooms made in the second story. 

Mr. Nan Nostrand objected to using this room for 
the hook and ladder company. The room was now 
used and was necessary for a ward room, and the 
room above was used for a school-room. 

Mr. Flvnn of Ward Seven hoped the order would 
pass, for the room was designed tor the purpose. If 
a ward room was wanted, it would not be neeessaary 
to go tar for good accommodations. By taking this 
room for the hook and ladder company it will save 
the citv $15,000 to *-3l),0(IO. 

Mr. Darrow added that the saving would be much 
greater than named— from *:50,000 to $40,000. 

Mr. Train of Ward Three was opposed to the pas- 
sane of the order, because it was against thewiehesof 
the people of that ward. Two of the members of the 
Council from that ward being absent, he moved that 
the subject be postponed to the next meeting of the 
Council. Carried. 

PETITIONS PRESENTED AND REFERRED. 
B. F. Edwards and John . I. Kayner, trustees of the 
estate of John Kayner, in relation to the widening of 
Hanover street. Referred to Committee on Streets, 
with other papers relating to the widening of Hanover 
street. 

REPOETS OF COMMITTEES. 

Mr. Osborja Of Ward Six, from the Committee on 
Public Instruction, on the request of the School 
Committee for further school accommodation in the 
Dearborn District, reported an order, which was read 
twice and passed, as follows : 

Ordered, That the Committee on Public Buildings 
be authorized to hire a room in Williams's block, at 
the corner of Albam and Hampden streets, at a rent 
of $150, to be lilted up as a school-room, for an addi- 
tional accommodation tor the Yeoman street primary 
school. 

Mr. Darrow, from the Committee on Fire Depart- 
ment on the part of the Common Council, made a 
report on the petitions of Stephen Cbamberlin and 
Charles i-'. Coffin, for leave to erect wooden buildings 
at South Boston. The Committee refer to a report 
recently submitted to the Hoard of Alderman, in 
which it is slated that since the 1st January, lKCS, no 
less than twenty-live wooden structures have been 
erected, or are now in piocess of erection, in south 
Boston, exceeding in size the limits prescribed by 
ordinance ; they also speak of the fact that the Hoard 
Of Engineers have notified all parties interested that 
no further violations of the ordinance will be permit- 
ted, and remark in conclusion that the time has come 
to strictly enforced the law, as otherwise the most 
disastrous results will ensue incase of lire. They ac- 
cordingly- recommended that the petitioners have 
leave to w ithdraw. The report was accepted. 

The same committee, to which was recommitted 
the report, in relation to the purchase of a lot of land 



for a hook and ladder house ami a ward room in 
Ward Fourteen, made a report in which thej state 
that as a difference of opinion appears to exist among 
the members of the government in relation to the 
proper location of the lot. they recommended the 
reference of the subject to the next City Council. 
The oommitteee are, however, of the opinion that 

■ improvements ~ 1 j < ■ 1 1 D 1 be made without delay 

iii i he building on Exeter street occupied by Hook and 
Ladder Company No. 4, and recommend the passage 
ofan order authorizing the erection of a building in 
the rear of the present structure, where the horses at- 
tached to the carriage may be kept. The order pro- 
vides for an addition not to extend more than twenty- 
eight feet in the rear of the present building, the ex- 
pense of the same not to exceed $8000, and to be 

charged to the appropriation for Public Buildings. 

The report, reference to the next City Council, was 
accepted, ami the order was read twice and passed. 

Mr. Bice Of Ward Four, from the Committee on Wa- 
ter, on the communication of the Water Hoard asking 
for an additional appropriation for Wards 13, 11, and 
!■">. made a report, accompanied by an order, author- 
izing the Treasurer to borrow, under the direction of 
the Committee on Finance. $250,000, to be added to the 
appropriation for laying pipes in Wards 13, 14. and 15. 

The order was read once, and a motion was made 
for a suspension of the rules for its second reading. 

Mr. Flvnn of Ward Seven said he was not prepared 
to vote for the order at the present time, and hoped it 
would be laid over. 

Mr. Keith of Ward l."> said the Water Commission- 
ers had stated the question very clearly in this com- 
munication. It had been round that the works in the 
Highland District had been prosecuted with fewer ob- 
stacles than was anticipated, and had advanced more 
rapidly than any one expected. The expense had al- 
so been lessened, while the effect of laying the pipes 
had been to increase the value of property from 25 to 
50 per cent. All of this was beneficial to the city. 
The Commissioners would be able at present to con- 
tract for the pipe at $4 per ton less than on the old con- 
tract, and the pipe was necessary for the next year's 
work. 

On a recent visit to Philadelphia, the Commission. 
ers were made acquainted with all the new improve- 
ments which had been adopted in relation to water 
works, and instead of the construction of a reservoir 
at great expense for the supply of wat a' in the dwell- 
ings on the highest land they had determined to make- 
that supply on the stand-pipe system. This stand- 
pipe would be located on the old Foot property, own- 
ed by the city, and it was believed the saving there- 
by, with the lessened cost of laying pipes, would ef- 
fect a saving of $200,000 in the cost of the supply of 
water in the Highland wards. It was desirable to 
make the contracts as soon as possible, and if done, a 
good supply of water would he furnished to all the 
people ot those wards in a year from this time. In 
view, however, of the opposition to the passage of the 
order at this time, ami to prevent the perilling of its 
passage, he would withdraw the motion for a suspen- 
sion of the rules, and let it lie over. 

ORDER PASSED. 
On motion of Mr. Wells of Ward Three it was 
( inlered, That the Committee on Streets on tie part 
of the Common Council inquire what measures have 
been taken in relation to an increase of pay of the em- 
ployes of the Internal Health and Paving Department. 
Adjourned. 



Proceedings of Board of Aldermen, 



DEC, 7. 1SGS. 



The regular weekly meeting of the Hoard of Alder- 
men was held this afternoon, His Honor Mayor sluirt- 
leff presiding. 

AIM-OINTMENT CONFIRMED. 

Samuel A. Cushing, as constable, for duty in the 
office of the City Treasurer. 



PROCEEDING'S OF CITY COUNCIL. 



65 



PETITIONS PRESENTED AND REFERRED. 

Charles F. Austin, for leave to maintain tlic fence 
adjoining his house on Applt ton street. 
Chauncey Page, for damages for grade of First 

StrCCt. , , ,, I XT- t l 

South Boston Gas Light Co. and others, that Ninth 
street, from Dorchester street to Lowland street, be 
graded. 

Albany Street Freight Railroad Co., for extension 
of location in Albanj street beyond the city stables. 

Severallj referred to the Committee on Paving. 

Joseph f)o\ve, to be relieved from assessment for 
the removal of a nuisance in Charles street. Referr- 
ed to the Commit! se on Health. 

James I'.. VVatkins and others, for the useofFaneuil 
Hall, January I. 1869, for Hie purpose of celebrating 
the Proclamation ofEmancipatiou. Referred to Com- 
mittee on Faneuil Hall. 

Register of Deeds, that certain indexes to plans, 
executions and depositions may be made. Referred 
tci Committee on County Accounts. 

Foote t \ Leighton and others, for repair of Lexing- 
ton street sewer. Referred to Committee on Sewers. 

Joseph G. Russell, surrendering his estate on Mat* 
thews street to the city. Referred to Committee on 
Streets. 

Geo. E. McNiel and others, for the use of laneml 
Hall on the evening of December 10, for a Working- 
men's meeting. Referred to Committee on Faneuil 
Hall, with full power. 

COMMUNICATION. 

The Mayor submitted a communication from the 
Commissioners on Public Lands of the Common- 
wealth of Massachusetts, conveying to the city of 
Boston the portion of Commonwealth avenue between 
Berkeley and Clarendon street-, with the request 
that it maj receive early attention. Referred to the 
Committee on Street-. 

At DITOR'S MONTHLY EXHIBIT. 

The monthly exhibit of the City Auditor, to Dee. J, 
1868, was presented, in print, showing the original 
appropriations for the financial year, the amount ex- 
pended, an 1 t is balances of each unexpended at mat 
date, recapitulation being a-; follows. 

Appropriations, etc. Expended. Unexpended 

General $7,126,632 42 $3,852,54830 $3,274,081 12 

Special 3,719,873 83 2,046,352 91 1 ,673,520 92 

$10,846,506 25 $5,898,901 21 $4,947,605 04 
NOTICES OF INTENTIONS TO BUILD. 

Small & Post, sixth street, between Dorchester 
avenue and K street: Kennedy & (alder, Border 
street, between Central square and Decatur street; 
Russell Scott, corner Ku.-tis and Winslow streets; 
Ivory Emmons, 213 and 215 Tremont street: John 
Sanderson, between Chelsea and Saratoga streets, 
near Putnam street; Hugh H. Rose, t Oxford street; 
Rnmrill & Stanton, Seneca street, near Dale street; 
st >phen Chamberlain, Preble street; Seth Robinson, 
corner of Ciarendou street and Clarendon place; .1. V. 
Bennett, Lexington street, between Meridian and 
Marion streets ; John Ogden, corner of First and 1' 
streets; J. E. & \. Brown, Nos. 2 to (I High street; 
also S to Hi High street; G. W. Meserve, Beach street, 
between Albany and Hudson streets; Moses Colby, 
corner of C and Athens streets, severally referred to 
( onunittee on Streets. 

PUBLIC HEARING ON ORDERS OK NOTICE. 

On order of notice relative to laying out the Mill 
Dam road as a public highway. No one appearing, 
the report w a- recommitted. 

On order of notice for laying- out Beacon street to 
the city limits. Recommitted. 

DEVONSHIRE STREET BETTERMENTS. 

On the order of notice relative to assessment on 
estates for betterments in the widening of Devon- 
shire street, a hearing took place. 

Thomas II. Russell, Esq., appeared in behalf of the 
owners of Brazer's Building. In equity and justice 
he contended that no portion of the betterment should 
be assessed on that estate. In a general way. so far 
as related to the betterment law, he said he had some- 
thing to do with its passage, and did not wish to take 
back anything as a matter of principle. That estate 
hail been assessed for improvements elsewhere, and 
in order to make it clear that the estate should be 
assessed for betterments., it must be shown that the 
widening of Devonshire street is a public necessity. 
This building, situated as it is, with ample means of 



access, does not require any additional conveniences, 
while, on the contrary by the widening of Devonshire 
street the building for its present purposes would be 
injured. 

As a special reason against such an assessment, 
he said that the Brazer's Building bad already con- 
tributed a large amount forthe widening of this street. 
This was in 1842, previous to which the street was 
but twelve feet in width. At that time 162 feet of land 
was taken on Devonshire street, which would now 
be worth at least $16,000. It was required that a strip 
of six feet on state street, and two on Devonshire 
street should be given up, the city giving in return 
a -trip on Congress square, but which was in no way 
so valuable as the land taken from the estate. 

The Mayor presented a letter from the corporation 
of Harvard College against an assessment of better- 
ment- on the Webb estate, owned by that corporation. 
Accompanying the letter was an" opinion of Hon. 
George T. Bigelow, that the city had no legal right to 
assess such a tax on that estate. 

Win. F. Weld objected to assessing betterments 
on stores in Winthrop square and Otis street, now 
much blocked by travel. By this widening an open- 
ing was made at one end of a street, but this did not 
necessarily improve the property at the other end of 
the same street He assumed that in some eases, as 
in Federal street, property near Milk street was not 
so valuable as previous to the widening of the street 
at a distance from that point. No other person ap- 
pearing, the report was recommitted. 

METROPOLITAN RAILROAD. 

The order of notice on petition for a new location 
on Temple place, and in Washington street from Boyls- 
ton street to Temple place, was considered. 

Hon. Harvey Jewell, in behalf of the Metropolitan 
Railroad Company, mane a statement of the wishes 
of the corporation* to provide further public accom- 
modations, much demanded. It was designed to run 
a portion of the cars from the SouthEnd, down Wash- 
ington street to Temple place, to accommodate people 
on that route, and to relieve the crowded condition of 
Boylston i treet. Under present circumstances the 
company cannot accommodate all of the great number 
of people who attend places of amusement, and Tem- 
ple place being now occupied entirely for stores not 
open in the evening, the number "fears necessary for 
public accommodations could be gathered without 
detriment to public travel. 

J. J. Mann of Boston Highlands made some state- 
ments in relation to the want of accommodation on 
Grove Hall avenue, and urged that no further privi- 
leges should be granted until tin' corporation should 
accommodate the people better on the routes already 
established by them. 

Hon. George S. Hillard objected to the new loca- 
tion on the part of the United sintes Government, in 
the noise and interruption to which the courts would 
be subjected. Ifthere was an overwhelming necessity 
for this track, he would of course submit, but un- 
less such a necessity was made clear, this proposed 
addition to the noise should not be imposed upon 
the suitors and parties interested in the United states 
( lourts. 

H. 1). Hyde, Assistant District Attorney, concurred 
with Mr. Hillard in relation to disturbance from noise 
of which judges and jurors had complained. 

In answer to Mr. Jew ell. Mr. Hyde said that he did 
not think that the noise would be any greater than 
flow if a pavemeint of wood should be ' laid, and thai 
he hoped for, even without the laying of a railroad 
track. 

A remonstrance was read by the Mayor from James 
Savage and others, owners and occupants of property 
on Temple place, and by David Chamberlain and 
others on Washington street, alleging that the new 
location would prove injurious to their property and 
business. 

Geo. O. Shattuck, in behalf of the remonstrants in 
Temple place and on Washington street, contended 
that the considerations in favor of the proposed meas- 
ure were very trivial in comparison with the incon- 
veniences which would be occasioned. 

Wm. H. Kennard (Bigelow Brothers & Kennard) 
stated as an objection to the proposed track that it 
would inconvenience customers in the stopping of 
carriage- near their premises. 

John Hogg (Hogg, Brown & Taylor) believed that 
a double track on Washington street would damage 
their business and their store, compelling them to a- 
bandon the store for another location. Carriag- 
es of their customers often stop in Temple place. 

A.K. Loring, .".l!t Washington street, stated that 



(>G 



PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL, 



a great deal of the retail trade in Washington street 
was from persons who came in carriages, and this 
trade would be diminished by a doable truck. 

John Sweetser (Sweet?er ,V Abbott), F.E.Weber, 
No. 7 Temple place, and C. 8. Davis (Hallett, Davis 
ft Co.,) made similar objection.- Ln relation to the 
trade on Temple place. 

Thos. C. Amory urged as a farther consideration 
that the owners of estates on Temple place made a 
considerable concession to the eity in Che laying out 
of the street. It was admitted that value of property 
had been much improved, yet Che city had received a 
full equivalent for the expense which bad been en- 
curved. 

Mr. shattuck made some further remarks in oppos- 
ition to the location, and suggested that it was proba- 
ble the United States Owned a strip of land three feet 
in width on the street, and if so. the city had no right 
to take such land for the proposed uses. 

The report was recommitted. 

EAST Huston PEEKY TOLLS. 

The public heaving of remonstrants <>n the .subject 
of increase of the East Boston Ferry tolls, came up, 
by assignment. 

'Alderman Seaver stated that the order requiring an 
account of the travel over the ferry for eight days, 
on account of delay in its passage through the other 
branch of the City Council, bad not been put iu 
operation until this day, and accordingly the objec- 
tion of remonstrants could not be fully heard at this 
time. 

Alderman Seaver presented remonstrances from the 
National Dock Company and Others, 11. II. Lincoln 
and Others, A. F. Gray & Co. and others, David II. 
Blaney and others, and C. II. & F. B. Day and others, 
against the increase of the rates of tolls. 

Judge Wright stated that the parties for whom be 
appeared were not prepared with their facts on the 
subject, and would like further time for making their 
objections. 

On motion of Alderman Seaver, the subject was 
postponed to Dec. 21. 

NEW MARGINAL STKEET. 

The report on the laying out of the proposed new 
Marginal street (City Document No. 128) was taken 
tip, by assignment, when Alderman Cobb moved that 
it be recommitted to the Committee on Streets, with 
instruction^ to report the necessary resolve and or- 
der to lay out the street as proposed. 

Alderman Cobb addressed the Board in support of 
the motion, as follow a . 

Mr. Mayor: It seems hardly neeessary,afterreading 
the excellent report of the Committee on Laying Out 

nd Widening streets, and after the free interchange 
of opinion which has been informally had among the 
members of this Board since this matter has been un- 
der consideration, and in view of the favor with which 
the proposed improvement appears to be received by 
the community, that I should occupy your time in fur- 
ther discussing it. But believing as 1 do, that any 
project which promises to advance, even in the least de- 
gree, the prosperity and growth of our city, should 
receive the early and the I arnest attention of the City 
Council, and entertaining no doubt that a wi.se expend- 
iture of money for public improvement will meet 
with the approbation of those whom we represent, I 
desire, as a commercial man, to say a few words in 
favor of the laying out the proposed Marginal 
street. 

At regards the cost of this improvement, it may be 
promised in the outset that it will involve a large 
outlay of money. Indeed, such is the estimate of the 
committee, who appear to have given careful attention 
to this matter; but I am at the same time quite satis- 
tied that the views of these gentlemen relating to the 
betterments are substantially correct, at least as 
nearly correct as any estimate can be in advance. 
Now, if their estimates are correct, or nearly so, it is 
plain that this great work may be accomplished at a 
mere nominal expense, if any, to the city, and that 
the owners oi the abutting estates are also to be great- 
ly benefited. And so certain do I feel that the com- 
pletion of this work will be one of the most valuable 
improvements yet made in Boston, that if the figures 
given by the committee had been far less favorable, I 
should have felt no hesitancy in declaring myself as 
in favor of the undertaking. 

Now what are some of the improvements to be 
made by the laying out of this street? and of what 
benefit will it be to the city at large, when completed? 
1 answer, in the first place, that about seven acres of 
land, now available only in a comparatively limited 



sense, as docks, will be added to the territory of the 
city ; secondly, the building of this street will Insure 
the early removal of Fort Hill, by providing a place 
of deposit for the earth now constituting that hill, 
thereby adding another Court sen acres of territory 
C which is now comparatively worthless) to the im-i- 

OCSS portion of (he city. 

Again, we shall have an avenue one hundred feet 
in width, extending for little more than half a mile 
along the water front of the centre Of the city, which 
will afford ample room for railway tracks to connect 
with all our railroads, and, at the same lime, for the 
passage of drays and teams from one part of the city 
t > the other, thus greatly relieving our other narrow 
and crowded streets, -some oj the docks, u-ed only 

for the small eoasting vessels, are positive nuisances 
at the present time: and anion.: the advantages which 
will result incidentally from carrying out this im- 
provement is the filling of these docks and Hie dis- 
charge of offensive sewerage matter, now deposited 
on flats bare at low tide, into deep water. 

surley, then, if to the already too circumscribed 
limits of that portion of the city devoted lo business 
uses, an area of twenty-one acres can be added, the 
taxable property increased by several millions, the 
owners largely benefited, and the means and facilities 
for the transaction of business multiplied, shall we 
not fail in the performance of our duty if we delay 
passing the necessary orders for an early consumma- 
tion of so desirable a public improvement'-' 

Boston already occupies an important and influen- 
tial position, both as a commercial and as a large 
manufacturing centre; but its people must be alive to 
progress, and see to it that no opportunities for in- 
creasing its trade lie lost, and that it keeps up in en- 
terprise with its more pretentious neighbors, and 
offers at least equal inducements w itb them for both 
foreign and domestic traffic. Let it not be said, in 
truth, that with its superior advantages of location, 
of its capacious harbor, of its railways extending in 
all directions, of its abundant capital, and not least 
of the undoubted mercantile ability of its merchants, 
it falls far short of what it might be. by failing to 
anticipate the wants of an increasing trade by seizing 
upon and completing just such enterprises as this. 

Who doubts that the laying out of this avenue and 
the levelling of Fort Hill will at once be followed by 
the erection upon this valuable territory of block- of 
spacious and substantial warehouses and grain ele- 
vators for the more convenient transaction of whole- 
sale business, and for the deposit of every description 
ol foreign and domestic merchandise accessible alike 
to the railway car and to the st amcr or ship, tlier ibj 
uniting, and mav I not say securing a fair share of 
the immense exportation of the products of the r I 
West and of Canada, in addition to a large incr 
of the shipment of our own products a .d manufac- 
tured goods and a '"orresp indiug inert ise of importa- 
tions, that would one vita bly follow tie greater fac- 
ilities and consequent decreased expense of ship- 
ment? 

And, looking to the immediate future, with a direct 
railway communication between the deep water of 
our harbor and that of the bay of San Francisco, ami 
still beyond to the immense trade that is about to be 
developed between the Atlantic and the Pacific and 
Chinese waters across this continent, shall we mike 
no effort, with all the means at our control, to secure 
a share of this? And how- can we make a better 
beginning than by providing at once a proper ter- 
minus on our tide water, so that the car which is 
loaded at San Francisco shall carry its freight direct- 
ly alongside the steamer at Boston, or to the ware- 
house prepared for its reception on the proposed 
Marginal street? 

Viewed in any light, it seems to me that the laying 
out of this street will be a great benefit to Boston, 
and I therefore desire to see the City Council tike the 
necessary step- for the commencement of the work at 
an early day. I hope, sir. that the motion which 1 
have made will prevail, and that the necessary resolve 
and orders will be reported as soon as practicable. 

Alderman Messinger expressed his approval of the 
project, and referring to proposed modifications and 
suggestions by other parties, he said he supposed the 
committee bad taken all of these measures into con- 
sideration, and accordingly be was willing to vote 
for the new street, as reported by them. 

The motion to recommit was carried. 

UNFINISHED BUSINESS. 

The following orders wers read a second time and 
passed. 



PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



67 



Order to pay James Carbrey $1,400 for land damages 
on Congress street. 

Order to pay heirs of John P. Torndike $1800 for 
land damages on Congress street. 

Order to construct a sewer in Purchase street, be- 
tween Congress and Summer streets. 

Order to pay Thomas Conley :iMuO for extension of 
Sixtb street. 

COMMON COUNCIL PAPERS. 

Petitions from the Common Council were referred 
in concurrence. 

The report and order for additional accommoda- 
tions for Yeoman Street Primary school was accepted 
in concurrence. 

The reports, "leave to withdraw," on petitions ot 
Charles F. Coffin, and Stephen Chamberlain, for 
leave to erect certain wooden buildings in South Bos- 
ton, were also accepted. 

The reference to the next City Council on the subject 
of a Ward room for Ward Fourteen was concurred 
in. 

The order to build an addition to Hook and Ladder 
House No. 4, on Kustis street, being under considera- 
tion 

Alderman Richards moved its reference to the Com- 
mittee on Fire Department, and suggested that the 
Committee on Cem steries and the Committee on Pub- 
lic Buildings also ought to be consulted in the mat- 
ter. 

After further remarks by Alderman Seaverand Pratt 
the motion was carried. 

METROPOLITAN RAILROAD LOCATION. 

The report of the Committee on Paving, granting 
the eighteenth location in laying down additional 
track on Tremont and Dudley streets, was taken up 
and passed, providing lor an additional track near 
Lagrange street to Eliot street, and a side track on 
Dudley strest, near Adams street, under certain 
conditions specified. 

REPORTS OF COMMITTEES. 

Alderman Talbot from the Committee on Streets, 
report , 'i I no a.t ion necessary on sundry notices of 
intention to build. 

Also, no action necessary on petition of Alson 
Gurcelon, against assessment for betterments on 
extension of Brimmer street. 

Also, leave to withdraw on petition of William 
Holtzer, lessee, for payment lor damages in the 
widening of Tremont street, and of Thomas Conley 
for reference to arbitration on claim for Sixtb street 
damages. 

rhese reports were severally accepted. 

Alderman Richards, from the Committee on the 
Fire Department, reported in favor of petroleum 
licenses to several per -on- named. 

Alderman Talbot, from the Committee on the 
Assessors' Department, reported leave to with- 
draw on petition of Charles Cullis, for abatement 
of tax on the Consumptive's Home on the ground 
thai the institution is not incorporated and cannot 
come under the exemption by law Ol property for 
charitable purposes. Accepted. 

The same committee, on the petition of John C. 
Gray, Jr., for the refunding of a tax assessed on 
twenty live shares of the stock of the Hank of Com- 
merce, New York, in the year 1S(I7, reported in favor 
of granting this petition, on the ground that the Su- 
preme Court had decided that stock in national banks 
was not taxable outside of the state where located, 
and an order was passed, as follows : 

Ordered, That the treasurer be directed to refund 
to John C. Cray, Jr., the tax illegally assessed upon 
him in ISO? on twenty-five shares in a national bauk 
located in New York, amounting to $44 17, the same 
to be charged to receipts for taxes in 1867. 

Alderman Paul, from the Committee on Sewers, re- 
ported orders, which were passed, as follows: 

Order directing the Superintendent of Streets to 
construct a sewer in Kendall street. 

Order to pay the Boston & Providence Railroad 
Company $6ts 24 for land on Ruggles place, taken 
for the construction of the Stony Brook sewer, to be 
charged to appropriations for said sewer. 

Alderman Talbot, from the Committee on Streets, 
reported orders as follows, which were passed: 

Order to lay out as a puulic street, sixty feet in 
width, so much of Beacon street as lies within the 
limits of the city. 

Order to lay out as a public street, seventy feet in 
width, so much of the Mildam road as lies betweeu 



the easterly line of Clarendon street and the line of 
Brookline. 

Alderman Woodman, from the Committee on Fire 
Alarms, reported the following order, which was 
passed. 

Ordered, That the Superintendent of Fire Alarms 
be authorized to replace twenty of the present Fire 
Alarm signal-boxes with the Automatic Signal-boxes, 
at an expense not exceeding $1200, to be charged 
to the appropriation for Fire Alarms. 

Alderman White, from the Committee on Licenses, 
reported favorably on sundry petitions for innholders 
and victuallers; also in favor of license of Patrick 
Sheppard for a sparring exhibition, and of Hadley & 
Co. lor a parlor entertainment at South Boston, and 
revoking license of Caleb Smith of Cambridgeport as 
collector of grease and bones. Severally accepted. 

Alderman Messinger reported an order for an a- 
batement of nuisances, which was passed. 

On motion of Alderman Messinger, the following 
order was passed : 

Ordered, that His Honor the Mayor be and he is 
hereby requested to petition the next Legislature for 
leave to extend Fast Chester park across Roxbury 
creek, either by solid filling or by a pile bridge, with 
a suitable draw in the same. 

Alderman Talbot, from the Committee on Streets, 
reported the following orders, which were passed, 
viz : 

Order to pay to the heirs of Ebenezer Francis 
413,237 05 for land taken and damages in the widen- 
ing of Federal street. 

Order to pay to John P. Thorndiko $7400 for land 
taken to widen Williams street, now Matthews 
street. 

Order to pay to heirs of Ruel Baker $10.JG for land 
taken to widen Tremont street. 

Order to pay to Win. Brigham $!)ii0 for damage to 
building on Way's estate in Federal street. 

An order offered by Alderman Pratt to assign a 
room in the Bureau of Charities Building to the 
secretary of the Boston Soldier*' Fund, and to reas- 
sign other rooms in the City Hall to be made vacant 
by the change, was referred to Committee on Over- 
seers of the Poor. 

On motion of Alderman Seaver, it was ordered that 
the several speeches in favor of the new Marginal 
street, made in the Board, be printed with the report 
of the committee on that subject. 

OKDEUS OF NOTICE. 

On petition ofHogan & Wetherbee, for permission 
to run a portable steam engine in their Shop, on the 
corner of Chapman and Emerald streets. Hearing 
Dec. 28th, 4 P. M. 

On petition of Lon Morris, for a stable for more 
than four horses, on Brookline sir et. betwe< n Shaw- 
niut avenue and Tremont street. Hearing Dec. 14, 1 
P. M. 

Adjourned. 



Proceedings of the Common Council, 

DEC. 10, 1868. 



The regular weekly meeting of the Common Coun- 
cil was held this evening, Chas. H. Allen, the Presi- 
dent, in the chair. 

IWPEliS FROM THE BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 

The Auditor's Monthly Exhibit was read and placed 
on file. 

The order to refer to the Committee on Overseers of 
the Poor the subject of assigning a room in the Cen- 
tral Charity Bureau Building to the Secretary of the 
Boston Soldiers' Fund, was referred in concurrence. 

The following orders were passed in concurrence: 

Order requesting the Mayor to petition the Legisla- 
ture for leave to extend East Chester park across Rox- 
bury canal. 

Order directing that the tax illegally assessed on J. 
C. Cray, Jr., in 1867, be refunded. 



68 



PROCEEDINGS OF CITV COrxcn, 



The order authorizing tw enty of the present Are a- 
larra signal boxes to be replaced bj the "automatic 
signal boxes" at a coel nol exceeding 11200) coming 
up, Mr Morse of Ward Thirteen moved to amend bj 
providing thai all of the old Bignal l)oxee throughout 
the city be replac id bv the automatic signal boxos, at 
an expense nol exceeding $4500. 

In support of the motion, the mover stated thai there 
were sixty-four of the "M boxes which had been in 
service since 1851, and were liable to get oul of order 
and mislead the firemen. The automatic boxes had 
been pul up at East Boston and at the Highlands, and 
had proved trustworthy, and as they should be the 
- line all over the city, the amendment provided for a 
change oi the new boxes for the old ones. 

Mr. Darrow of Ward Eight, in order that the Coun- 
cil should understand the matter thoroughly, said it 
should fee stated that many of the boxes were liable 
to get out of order, and to make sure of the passage 
of this order . it was only asked for a change of those 
which were the most unreliable. 

Mr. Wells of Ward Three said the superintendent 
had spoken of but twenty which were oul of order 

and needed to be replaced. 

Mr. Morse said he was aware that this was the !■<■- 
port Of the committee, and that the superintendent 
had not asked for a change of all the boxes, bul inas- 
much as a change had been asked for, in part, it would 
not be long before the remainder will require to be 

changed. „. . . , , 

Mr. Osoorn of Ware Six inquired bow long the au- 
tomatic boxes had besn in use, and whetherit was not 
possible for further improvement to be made. If so, it 
would he well to provide for what were now asked 
for, and wait until further changes were indispensa- 
ble, when it was possible better ones might he had. 

The motion was further debated, in which the diffi- 
culties connected with the working of the Old boxes 
were stated, and that while it was not uncommon for 
a wrong signal to be given through them there had 
been no failures in the working of the new ones. It 
was urged that the Superintendent <>t Fire Alarms 
was re. eh to show the dill'eronc. in the working, and 
to enablemembers to understand the subject more 
fully, the amendment was withdrawn. 

A motion was made for a suspension of the rules, 
which was carried, on the ground that immediate ac- 
tion-was required in the change of the boxes as con- 
templated in the order, and the order was passed. 

UNFINISHED BUSINESS. 

The following orders were passed : 

Order bills to pay December draft. 

order authorizing radiators to be put into the Law- 
rence Schoolhouse, at a cost not exceeding $2000. 

Order for a loan of $11,000 to be added to the amount 
heretofore appropriated for raising the grade of Shaw- 
niiii avenue and Ruggles street. 

Order for a loan of $250,000 to be added to the ap- 
propriation for main, service pipe and hydrants, in 
Wards 13, 14 and 15. 

FREE CONCERTS. 



The joint special committee to whom was referred 
the petition of James L. Little and others, thai free 
weekly concerts may be given under the direction 
of the City Government, during the winter months, 
made a report, in which they say. 

The petitioners represent property taxed in this 
( it) to the amount of $14,000,000. A.1 a public hearing 
given to all persons interested, a number of gentlemen 
who have taken a leading interest, appeared before 
the committee and stated that they believed from 
long and careful observation in this country and in 
Europe, that the standard of public morality would 
be raised by the establishment of free concerts, of 
vocal or instrumental music, in some large hall in 

this city ; that it would not only furnish amusement 

but a means of education — a mora c mrplete develop- 
ment of ihe idea which led to the establishment of the 
Public Library, ami morei'econtly of evening schools. 

No person has offered to object to the prayer of t le 
petitioners, ami on all hands the committee have re- 
ceived assurances of the unanimity of sentiment in 
favor of the project. The success which has attended 
the establishment of free concerts by the Govern- 
ments of Other countries has been so marked as to 
afford an almost sure guarantee of success here. Be- 
lieving that the measure proposed would have a 
beneficial Influence, the committee recommend the 
passage of the accompanying order. 

Ordered, That the Joint Special Committee on the 
petition of James L. Little and other-, be authorized 
to give concert- of vocal or instrumental music, in 



some public hall in this city, to which the p -ople -hall 

be admitted without expense, on such evenings dur- 
ing the month- of December, January and Kebrnary 
as they may deem expedient, the expense thereof, 
not exceeding $2500, to be charged to the appropria- 
tion for incidental expenses. 

The order was read twice and passed. 

Mr. Stevens, from the Committal Streets on the 

part of the Common Council, to whom was referred 
the inquiry as to what measures had been taken in 
relation loan Increase of the pay of the em ploy i 
the departments of Internal Health and Paving sub- 
mitted a report, with statements from the superin- 
tendents of these department*. In the Department 

of Paving, it w as si alt d that there had been llOini rea-e 

of pay this year, the wages paid to common laborers 
being from $1 75 to $1 88 per day ; of mechanics from 

$2 to $3, and Of teamsters from sen to $52 pi r month. 
In the I tepavt nent of Health it was -t -led tied then- 
was an increase in 1867, I mt there had been no increase 
this year except in one class of teamsters, of $2 per 
month. The rates paid wire from $40 to set per 
month. The report was accepted- 
Mr. Wells of Ward Three offered the following 
resolve : 

Resolved,, That in the opinion of the members of 
this Council, the pay of laborers in the paving and 
health departments should not be le-- than s_> per 
day. 

Mr. Wadsworth of Ward Four moved its reference 
to the Committee on Health on the part of the Coun- 
cil. 

.Mr. Wells said Hie Council bad just heard the report 
of the committee to which the ubject had been referr- 
ed, and no disposition was shown by it to do any- 
thing. There was no gentlemen in this Council who 
expected to pay any lcs- than from si to $2 25 tor 
tiny laborer whom they might employ, and it was not 
reasonable to require the laborers to work for si 75 
per day. At present prices of living a man could 
not support a family on such wages, and should not 
be expected to work al such low rates. 

Mr. Lenny of Ward Ten said he did not know as 
it Wits the duty of the Committee on .streets to report 
an increase of pay of these laborers, and it was stat- 
ed that there had been no petition from them for in. 

crease Of pay. He should vote for the reference. 

.Mr. Wells" of Ward Three said there had been 
petitions presented for an increase of pay in both 
departments of taller, and a petition hail been pre- 
sented for an increase of pay of the police officers, 
which had been disposed of in a similar manner by 
taking no notice of it. 

Mr. Darrow of Ward Eight remarked it must be ev- 
ident that no laborer culd live O'l so small a sum as 
si 7."i 'per day. They could only stay. 

Mr. Osborn of Ward six thought it a proper course 
that the order should be referred to a committee, and 
if it was shown that an increase should be made he 
would vote for it. He did not desire to vote on the 
question with no more light than he now had. 

Mr. Pickering of Ward Fourteen advocated the ref- 
erence of the order to a committee, and Messrs- -Jenks 
of Ward Three, Flynn of Ward 7, Harrow of Ward 
Eight and Carney of Ward 2, contended that the order 
should be passed al once. 

Mr. Newton of Ward Nine said it appeared that this 
order required the expression of an opinion by the 
Council in a matter not concerning them, for the pur- 
pose of having an influence upon the Hoard of Alder- 
men. He did not know lint the pay was too small, 
and if so, it should he increased, but he would have 
the matter go to the committee to get all the light that 
was necessary on the subject. 

The yeas and nays were ordered on the passage Of 
the order. 

In answer to Hie statement that the thirty-four 
names to the petition for an increase of pay wi re writ- 
ten by one hand, Mr. Jenks of Ward Three said the 
1 ict i tinners were among a class who were poor penmen 
and when they came together to petition for an in- 
crease, they requested some one of their number to 
write their names. 

Mr. Wright of Ward Twelve said it was not a com- 
mon practice of those who wish to buy anything or to 
employ labor, to go into the market and pay more 
than the market price. Hewasalittle suspicious of 
measures of this kind brought in just before the elec- 
tion, which had the appearance oi'a buncombe Char- 
acter. He was always suspicion- of those who claim 
to be par excellence the friends of the laboring man, 
for it looked like making political capital. For him- 
self, he wits not a candidate for reelection and did not 



PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



69 



require to make capital for his election. It was com- 
mon in such cases, to make a parade of names to af- 
fect elections, and it w >uld be as well to l«t the mat- 
ter go over, and have an impartial decision in the mat? 
ter <>ii its own merit 3. 

Messrs. Darr >ws and Wells disdained any expecta- 
tion of making capital for themselves. The last 
named said he did not believe the gentleman from 
Ward Twelve employed anybody at such low wages 
as was |i iid to these laborers of the city. 

Mr Wright replied that the Class of labor employed 
by him was of a kind which demanded higher wages, 
and there would l>e a difference in the prices of differ- 
ent kind of labor. He did, however, employ some 
labor as low as $1 51 per day, and there were others 
to w hom he paid as high as s'!:> per week. 

The question was taken on the motion to refer, 
Which was carried by a vote of 11 to is, as follows : 

Yeas— Bitchelder, Butler, Denny, Emerson, Gray, 
Hobbs, Hopkins. Knight, Leighton, Nelson, Newton, 
Osborn, Parker, Pickering, L. Bice, Stevens, Train, 
Wadsworth, Weston, Wilson. Wright, Young. 

Nays— Bishop, Carney, Harrow, Dinsmore, Dolan, 
Flan'ders, Flynn, Jacob's, Jenks. Kingsbury, Minon, 
Morse, S. Rice, Ryan, Van No.-trand, Welts, II. II. 
Whit.-, J. Whit?. " 

The order authorizing alterations in the building on 
Dorchester and Fourth str sets, for the ac lomodation 
of a hook and ladder carriage and apparatus connec- 
ted 1 her, 'with, was taken from the table, ami on mo- 
tion of Mr. Wright of Ward Twelve, was referred to 
the Committee on Public Buildings. 

On motion of Mr. Stevens of Ward Six the Commit- 
tee on Streets were authorized to report in print on 
the orders fr an the Board of Aldermen for the widen- 
ing of Hanover street and the extension of Broadway. 

ANNEXATION OF DORCESTEE. 

Mr. Train of Ward Three offered the following 
order: 

Whereas, in the opinion of the City Council, it has 
become nee sssary, in order to complete the system 
of drainage, and harbor improvements, which have 
been devised lor the benefit of Boston by the various 
commissions winch have had, and now have, these 
subjects in charge, to annex a portion or the whole 
of the town of Dorchester to the city of Boston, — 

Ordered, That his Honor the Mayor be requested 
to appoint a committee of three discreet and intelli- 
gent persons who shall carefully examine the subject 
in all its financial, industrial and sanitary relations, 
cause such survey to be made ny the city engineer or 
under his directions as they may consider necessary 
and report the result of their doings, with BUggestionB 
as they may think prober, to the City Council as soon 
as may be. 

The'or ler was read once and was ordered to be 
printed. Adjourned. 



Proceedings of Board of Aldermen, 



DEC. 14, 1868. 



The regular weekly meeting of the Board of Alder- 
men was held this afternoon, His Honor Mayor Shurt- 
letl presiding. 

AIM 'OINTMENTS CONFIRMED. 

Joseph W. Dudley, as Constable, for duty at the 
Treasurer's office. 

Benjamiu s. Marshall and ( llarence Gutterson, spec- 
ial police officers without pay, for duty at the Lowell 
Railroad depot; Charles Hebbard, for duty atSalom's 
store, 365 Washington street; John W. Brownbill, 
for duty at the Indiana Place Church. 

PETITIONS PRESENTED AND REFERRED. 

Daniel Davies, for apportionment of betterments on 
Brimmer street. 

C. W. Freelandand others, that Marlborough street, 
between Dartmouth and Berkeley streets, be accepted. 

Hannah Bradford, surrendering her estate on Mat- 
thews street to the city. 



Martin Lennon, to be paid for land taken to widen 
Albany street. 

C. H. Dalton, for apportionment of Brimmer street 
b ittermenfs into three parts. 

Abuer W. Pollard and others, that Glenwood street 
be laid out as a highway. 

Henry \V. Foote, for apportionment of betterments 
in Brimmer street. 

C. .1. Bishop, for apportionment of betterments 
on Howker street into three parts. 

Severally referred to the Committee on Streets. 
Board of Assessors, for additional office room. Re- 
ferred to the Committee on Public Buildings. 

D. H. Shirley, that an opening in sidewalk at No. 
50 Beach street may be made secure or closed up. 
Referred to Committee on Paving. 

Mary A. Holbrook, to be compens ited for impaired 
drainage in Village street. Referred to Committee 
on Claims. 

Abner W. Pollard and others, that Glenwood street 
be lighted with gas. Referred to Committee on 
Lamps. 

Sophr.mia Farnum and others, that Ruggles place 
be tilled up where the Stony Brook sewer was laid. 
Referred to Committee on Sewers. 

NOTICE3 OF INTENTIONS TO BUILD. 
A. G. Bead, on Clifford street, near Grove Hall av- 
enue; J. A. Bell, No. 40 Batterymarch street; Maria 
d'JesuS, Princeton street, between I'reseotl and Ka- 
gle streets; Faulkner ,v Clarke, 146 Tremonf street. 
Severally referred to the Committee on Streets. 

HEARINGS ON ORDERS OF NOTICE. 

A hearing took place on the assessment of better- 
ments for the widening of Matthews streets. 

S. S. Arnold objected to the assessment of better- 
ment on his estate, No. 3 High street, on the ground 
that his estate bad not been benefited and that the or- 
der of the Board as originally passed for the widen- 
ing of said street had not been complied with. 

No other person appearing, the report was recom- 
mitted. 

On the several orders of notice on the laying out of 
Commonwealth avenue, the widening of Walnut av- 
enue, widening of Gardner street, discontinuance of 
a portion of Washington street at the corner of Gard- 
ner street, and the building of a stable by Lou Morris, 
no person appearing in opposition, the reports were 
recommitted. 

UNFINISHED BUSINESS. 

The order to abate an assessment on Robert W. 
Ames of $88 66 for a sewer in Auburn street; and on 
William and Augustus.Bacpn of $5155 for a sewer 
in Auburn street; also to abate: an assessment of 
$43 95 on George Howe, for a sewer on Providence 
street, the amount to be assessed on D. Humphrey 
Storer, was passed. 

COMMON COUNCIL PAPERS. 

Petitions from the Common Council were referred 
in concurrence. 

The following were also passed in concurrence. 

Report and order for a loan of $250,000, for laying 
water mains and service pipes in Boston Highlands. 

Report and order for expenditure of $2.i00 for free 
concerts in December, January and February. 

In the consideration of the la*s( mentioned order, 

Alderman Pratt stat id that he had seen it intimated 
that a portion of the free concerts was designed to be 
given by the children of the Public schools. If so. 
he hoped that such vocal music by children would 
be voluntary, otherwise be should object, for it would 
be too much of a draught upon the children of the 
public, schools. 

Alderman Braman said the matte)- had been a 
suggestion merely, and ofcourse any part which the 
children might take would be voluntary. If this 
suggestion should be adopted, it would be but an 
experiment, and would not be continued should it 
prove objectionable. 

The report and order for location of l k and lad- 
der carriage in new Ward Room in Ward \i coming 
up on its reference in concurrence to the Committee 
on Public Buildings, 

Alderman Richards opposed the reference on the 
ground that the building having been put up for the 
benefit of the citizens as a Ward Room, it should not 
be diverted from that purpose and dedicated to the 
fire department. Such a change was not just to the 
citizens of the Ward, and be did not think it would 
be an object to refer the matter to the Committee 
which already has duties onerous enough to be 
performed. 



7<> 



I'HOCKKDIXdS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



On motl hi of Al lerman James, the Bubject was 
Indefinite!] p istponed. 

REP1 »B rS "I COMMITTEES. 

Alderman White, from the Committee on licenses, 
submitted a reporl of the Chief of Police of the num- 
bers of places in this city where intoxicating liquors 
are sola, with the number which are nol licensed. 
The whole number reported was 2007, of which 211 
are places where sales are made without license. 
The report was laid on the table and ordered to be 
printed. 

The following is a synopsis of the reprort from the 
aeveral Police Stations; Station I— licensed, 339; 
unlicensed, 41 ; Station 2 — licensed, 286; unlicensed, 
13; Station 3 — licensed, 243; unlicensed, 31; Station 
I — licensed, 336; unlicensed, J7; Station •"> — licensed, 
202; unlicensed. -l~ . Station 6— licensed, 2",-2: unli- 
censed, -is: Station 7 — licensed, 12:1: unlicensed, '>: 
Station 8 — licensed, 88; unlicensed, 5; Station 9 — li- 
censed, 210; unlicensed, 14; Total licensed, -207 1 ; 
unlicensed, 211. 

The same committee reported that the license of 
Pielro Dola'n to keep a billiard table at No. :J4 Ferry 
street be revoked forcause. Accepted. 

The committee reported favorably on other peti- 
tions, for a billiard room in the Everett House, and 
for leave to deliver lectures on anatomy. Severally 
accepted. 

Alderman James, from the Committee on Paving, 
reported leave to u it In I raw on the petition of Wilkin- 
son, Carter & Co., ami of Alonzo Fnrrar, tor leave 
to lay pipes under Bremen and Chelsea street-. 
Severally accepted. 

Alderman Richards, from the Committee on Fanenil 
Hall, reported in favor of the petition of James 15. 
Watkins and others, for the use of Fanenil Hall on 
the 1st of January, limiting the use of the same to 
:: o'clock A. M. on the 2d. Accepted. 

Alderman Talbot, from the Committee on Streets, 
reported reference to the next Board of Aldermen on 
the recommitted report on assessment of better- 
ments for the widening of Devonshire street. Ac- 
cepted. 

Alderman Talbot, from the same committee report- 
ed no action necessary on sundry notices of intention 
to build; also no action necessary on petition of E. 
If. Cheney that the lines of Thomas street lie deter- 
mined; and leave to withdraw on the petition of Wm. 
B. Spooner and others for the widening of Congress 
street at tin- corner of Milk street, and of Mr. c. Todd 
and other- lor the laying- out of Gold street. Sev- 
erallv accepted. 

Alderman Paul, from the Committee on Sewers, 
reported orders for assessments for cost of sewers, 
on Washington and Gardner streets $519710; 1 abol 
street -ewer, s.">7~> 57; High street sewer, $17416; 
Beacon street sewer, $2905 05; Severally passed. 

Alderman Paul also reported reference to next 
Board of Aldermen, on petition of Foster & Leigh ton, 
for repair of sewer under their wharf, which cannot 
be done until another season. Accepted. 

Alderman Messinger, from the Committee on 
Health, reported leave to withdraw on petition of 
Joseph Dow to be releived from assessment for a- 
batcment of nuisance in Charles street, also, revoking 
license of .lames Henry of Cam Bridgeport, for collec- 
ting bones J and granting the request of I. on .Morris, 
for leave to build a stable for more than four horses, 
on Brookline street. Severally accepted. 

Alderman Braman, from the Committee on Lamps, 
on the petition of Peter Daily and others, that lamps 
may he placed and lighted in Lawrence street, re por- 
ted inexpedient on account of the unsafe condition of 
the street. Accept! .!. 

Alderman Talbot, from the Committee on streets. 
reported estimates of the expense of widening of 
federal street, amounting to $306,039 35; also esti- 
mates of the expense of widening of High street, a- 
mounting to $68,339 in. Severally adopted. 

Alderman Braman, from the Committee on Armo- 
ries, reported in favor of approval of armories in the 
old Unitarian Church building, lor Cos. B and C, l-t 

regiment and Co. II. 9th regiment. Accepted. 

Alderman Cobb, from the Committee on claims, re. 
ported leave to withdraw on the petition OfE. .Maria 
Simonds, to be compensated tor extra services as a 
teacher in the public schools. Accepted. 

Also, leave to withdraw on petitions of Cornelius 
Donovan, Constantine Met, inn.--, Cornelius Shehan 
and J. Donovan, to he compensated for injuries by 
reason of impaired drainage in Middlesex, Castle. 
Emerald and Village streets. Accepted. 



Mr. James, from the Committee on Public Lands, 
reported reference to ( ommittee on Public Buildings 

on the petition of Win. II. Adam- lor the -ale of;, tot 
of Land on l)ix place, adjoining the .-oiioolhoii-e. 
Accepted. 

NEW HOSPITAL FOB Tilt: INSANE. 

The Joint Standing Committee on Public Institu- 
tions, to whom were referred the modified plan- and 
estimates of the Bost »n Hospital for the in-. me, sub- 
mitted a report in print. 

The t ommittee refer to the fact that the subject of a 

new hospital has been before the Council for the la-t 
live years, presented in carefully prepared report- 
by the Board of Directors for Public institutions, and 
to the many opportunities \\ hich the members of the 
present Go venneut have had to examine the institu- 
tion at South Boston, and the new site for a hospital 

in the town of Winthrop. a- reasons why no new ex- 
position of the matter are repaired at this time. 

They then -ay : 

They feel it due to themselves, however to state, 
that the apparent delay in reporting upon the plans 
and estimates submitted to them has not arisen from 
any feeling of indifference to the necessity of provi- 
ding better accommodations for the patients in the 
South Boston Asyluni ; for, although thej have been 
unable to agree upon the location, they air unani- 
mous in the opinion that the erection of a new build- 
ing in .-oine other locality than the one now occupied 
is an absolute necessity. 

The committee are also united in recommending the 
adoption of the plans made by Natnaniel -t. Bradlee, 
substantially as presented to the goverment in 1867. 
They believe that the first consideration in building a 
new hospital should be the health and comfort of the 
inmates ; and that whatever the progress of science 
ha- developed in that direction, whatever will conduce 
to the permanence and usefuless of the institution, 
aim whatever the future growth of the city is likely 
to demand, should be introduced — not regardless of 
expense, but making the item of expense a secondary 
consideration. 

The plans were not referred to the Committee un- 
til about the first of July; and as the adjournment of 
the Council took place soon after, and as an unusual 
number of important matters have been before the 
Goverment during the last two mont.ls, involving 
heavy expenditures of money, those member.- of the 
Committee who are not altogether satisfied with, the 
location in Winthrop have not bad time to make -tn ii 
an examination of other localities as would enable 
them to submit any positive recommendation. 

In this condition of the subject, and in view of the 

fact the present municipal year will soon close, the 

committee agree in earnestly recommending the whole 

subject to the early att 'Utio'n of the next ( ity Council. 

Respectfully submitted. 

For the Committee, 
G. W. Messinger, Chairman. 

The report was accepted. 

ORDERS OF NOTICE. 

On petition of the Albany street Freight Railroad 
Company for an extension of track in Albany street. 
Hearing' Dec. 31, 4 P. M. 

An order for the proposed assessment of betterments 
for the widening of High street. Hearing Monday, 
Dec. 28, 4 P. M. 

ORDERS PASSED. 

Order to lay out Commonwealth avenue as a public 
street, oetween Berkeley and Clarendon street-, at no 
expense. 

Order to discontinue a portion of Washington street 
at the corner of Gardner stree t. adjoining the estate of 
Rosa Prang. 

Order to widen Gardner street, at the corner of 
Washington street, by taking the land of Rosa Prang 
and of the City of Boston, at no expense. 

Order to widen Walnut avenue by taking land of 
heirs ofRalpb Hasking, amounting to 2260 square feet . 
at an expense of (1130. 

Order to pay heir.- of Mary .Tar\ is $3448 for land 
taken and damages occasioned by the widening of 
Fast Springfield street. 

Order to pay heirs oi Ralph Hasking $1130 for land 
taken and damages occasioned by the widening of 
Walnut avenue. 

Order to pay heirs of John Curtis $16,600 for land 
taken and damages occasioned by the widening of 
Federal street. 

Order to pay Harrison Ritchie and Samuel Eliot, 
trustees, $12,840 for land taken and damages occasion- 



PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



71 



oil by the extension of Brimmer street from Mount 
Vernon to Chestnut street. 

Order to pay Frederick Gould $8050 for two estates 
on Richmond street, surrendered to the city for the wi- 
dening- of sail) street. 

Order to pay Alden L. Drake $21,300 for land taken, 
and damages occasioned by the widening of Federal 
street. 

Order for the collection of assessments of sundry 
persons in the laying <>1 sidewalks. 

PROSECUTIONS FOR VIOLATIONS OF THE LICENSE 
LAW. 

Alderman White offered the following order, which 
was passed. 

Ordered, That the Chief of Police be instructed to 
prosecute all persons in this city who are engaged di- 
rectly or indirectly in the sale of intoxicating liquors 
without a license; and also all persons who are sell- 
ing intoxicating liquors contrary to the terms of their 
licenses; and police officers are' hereby authorized to 
enter up<-n the premises of any licensed person to as- 
certain the manner in which they conduct their busi- 
ness. 

THE LAVING OUT OF ATLANTIC AVENUE. 

Alderman Talbot, from the Committee on Streets, 
reported in accordance with the wishes of the Hoard, a 
resolve and order laying out Atlantic avenue, a mar- 
ginal street, from l'owe's wharf to Commercial street, 
at Eastern avenue. The report concluded with the 
statement that the Hoard doth adjudge that the ex- 
pense of laying out the said Atlantic avenue as afore- 
said, for land and other damages, will amount to the 
sum of $9(0, not). The report was accompanied by the 
following order. 

Ordered, That the Treasurer be, and he hereby is, 
authorized to borrow, under the direction of the Com- 
mittee on Finance, the sum of twelve hunderd thous- 
and dollars, the same to be appropriated for land ta- 
ken and damages occasioned !>y the laying out of At- 
lantic avenue, from Broad street at Rowe's wharf to 
Commercial street at Eastern avenue ; for building the 
sea wall on the easterly side of the said avenue, and 
for tilling, grading and paving the same. 

Alderman Talbot stated that it would of course be 
understood that the carrying out of the measure would 
involve a further expense in connection with it, of ta- 
ken away Fort Hill, to be used in the filling up of 
this new avenue. 

Alderman Pratt said he wished also to bring to no- 
tice a further improvement which should be connected 
with this avenue— that ot continuing Prince street to 
its east irn terminus. 

The order waa passed, by a vote of 11 yeas, nays 
none. 

Alderman Cobb and liraman were appointed a com- 
mittee on the votes for municipal officers, cast this 
day. 

Adjourned to Thursday, 12 M. 



Proceedings of Board of Aldermen, 



DEC. 17, 1868. 



A special meeting of the Board was held at noou 
to day, Mayor Shurtleff in the chair. 

INTENTIONS TO BUILD. 

G. F. MeLauthlen, 217 and 219 North street, Steph- 
en M. Allen, Texas avenue, J. F. Havnes, London 
(near Marion) street. Job. A. Turner,' corner Bow- 
dion square and Bnlfinch street, Thos. Mulloy, New- 
man street, South Boston, John Hurst, corner Bowen 
and D streets, South Boston, C. H. Knox, corner 
East Springfield and Washington streets. Severally 
referred to the Committee on Streets. 

PETITIONS. 

F. E. Oliver for apportionment of assessment on 
Brimmer street; of Silas W. Merrill for the same inn- 



pose. Referred to Committee on Streets. 

Thomas Mulloy, for the grade of Newman street. 
Referred to the Committee on Paving. 

COMMUNICATION. 

A communication was received from the Metropoli- 
tan Railroad Company, giving notice of the accept- 
enee of the 18th location. Read and placed on tile. 

l'APEKS FROM THE COMMON COUNCIL. 

The order assigning- a room to the Secretary of the 
Boston Soldier's Fund in the building of the" Central 
Charity Bureau, and reassigning other rooms in the 
City Hall to the City Engineer anil to the Lamp De- 
partment, was reported on favorable by Alderman 
White, and was passed in concurrence. 

REPORTS OF COMMITTEES. 

Alderman Cobb, from the Committee appointed to 
examine the return of votes cast in the several wards 
of the city for municipal officers, reported that the 
returns appear to be correctly made, and the results 
are properly recorded in the book kept for that pur- 
pose, from which it appears that the following named 
persons, having plurality of votes, have been chosen 
as Mayor and Alderman for the ensuing municipal 
year. 

Mavor— Nathaniel B. Shurtleff. 

Aldermen— Edward A. White, Beniaman James, 
Francis Richards, John T. Bradlee, Moses Fairbanks, 
Newton Talbot, Nathaniel Seaver, George P. Baldwin, 
Lewis Rice, Alberts. Pratt, Walter E. Hawes, W. T. 
Van Nostrand. 

The official vote for Mavor was as follows: Na. 
thaniel B. Surtleff, 11,005; Moses Kimball, 9156; Isaac 
W. May. 14:S; scattering, 22. 

For Aldermen, Edward A. White received, 1S,245; 
Benjamin James, 11,115; Francis Richards, 10,502; 
John T. Bradlee. 10.7S3; Moses Fairbanks, 10,402; 
Newton Talbot, 10,815; Nathaniel Seaver, 10,294; 
George P. Baldwin. 10,331; Lewis Rice,10,469; Albeit, 
S. Pratt, 10,302: Waller E. Hawes, 10,334; William T. 
VanNostrand, 10,251; George D. Kicker. 10,032; Wvze- 
man Marshall, 9568; John Tyler, 9213; George Curtis, 
->770 ; William A. Bust, 9826; Samuel Little, 9685; 
Sumner Crosby, 9372; Richard Beaching, 1848; Charles 
E. Jenkins, 9923; Joseph F. Paul, 9898; William Seav- 
er, 9783 ; Jacob B. Winsor, 132; S. N. Brvant, .",:;:;; 
S. M. Bryant, 77; II. L. Saxton, 130; Nathaniel E. 
Chase, ISO; Win. E. Barthtt. 130; I). F. Drake, 130; 
GeorgeE. McNeill. 130; John B. Bates, 129; James 
Chambers, 129,- James Short, 110; Solomon, Thomas, 
109; scattering, 53. 

Alderman James, from the Committee on Paving, 
reported leave to withdraw on petition of Patrick J. 
Clark, for leave to place a bulkhead at 72 Merrimac 
street: also of Chauncey Page, for grade of First 
st'-eet. Severally accepted. 

The same committee reported in favor of the peti- 
tion of Jftmes Leeds and others for cross-walks in 
Beacon street, at Clarendon and Dartmouth streets. 
Accepted. 

Alderman White, from the Committee on Licenses, 
reported in favor of the petition of the Charlestown 
Cadets to give a Concert at Music Hall, Dec. 21, 1868. 
Accepted. 

Alderman Paul remarked that he was unavoidably 
absent at the close of the last meeting, and was de- 
prived of the opportunity of recording his vote in fav- 
or of the new Atlantic avenue. He now desired the 
privilege, and the Board voted to grant it. 

ORDERS PASSED. 

The following orders were offered by Alderman 
Talbot, and passed. 

Ordered, that the Committee on laving out and 
Widening streets lie authorized to pay for the servi- 
ces of persons employed by them to 'make estimates 
of damages and betterments during the present year 
—the expenss thereof to be charged to the appropria- 
tion for laying out and widening streets. 

Ordered, that there be allowed and paid to Thomas 
W. Davis, City Surveyor, the sum of $500, in addition 
to his present salary, on account of extra labor and 
services required in his department the present year 
—said additional amount to be paid to him in 
monthly instalments, commencing- April 1. 1868, 
and ending March 31, 1869; and to be chaeged to the 
Department of Engineering and Surveviiu. 

Alderman Talbot referred to the onerous duties of 
the City Surveyor at the present time, and staled that 
the increase of salary would only bring the amount 
up to the other heads of departments. He hoped the 
order would pass unanimously. 



72 



PROCEED! XC i s OF CITY COUNCIL. 



Alderman James also alluded to tho Immense 
amount of labor now being performed by the City 
Surveyor, and said he BhouTd \ ote for the or ier. 

Ordered that the Superintendent of Streets be dt- 

. in grade Ninth street, betvi een Dorchest r and 

Low land streets, with ashes, and the Superintendent 

of Health be directed t > furnish ashes for th ■ purpose. 

Adjourned. 

Alderman Pratt, from the Committee on County 
Accounts, offered at the last meeting orders, which 
were read once, authorizing the Committee to con- 
tract with some suitable person or persons to make 
a classified index to the depositions and executions 
recorded in the office of the Registry of Deeds from 
the year Hun m L868; also, to make a classification of 
the grantor index and of the sales of real estate in 
the county for non-payment of taxes 



Proceedings of the Common Council, 



DEC. 17, 1868. 



The regular weekly meeting of the Common Coun- 
cil was held this evening, Chas. H. Allen, the Presi- 
dent, in the chair. 

PAPERS FROM THE BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 

Petition- from the Board of Aldermen were referr- 
ed in concurrence. 

The following reports were accepted in concur- 
rence: 

Report leave to withdraw on the petition of C. 
Donovan and others, to he compensated for injuries 
to their estates on account of impaired drainage. 

Report leave to withdraw on the petition of E.M. 
Simonds, to be paid for extra services as a Teacher 
in the Public Schools. 

Report reference to the Committee on Public 
Buiidings, on the petition of W. C. Adams for the 
sale of a City Lot on l>i\ place. 

Report reference to the next City Council of the 
Report on Plan-- ami Estimates for the Boston Hospi- 
tal for the insane, printed City Document No. 136, 
1868. 

ORDERS PASSED IX CONCURRENCE. 

Ordered, that a room be assigned to the Secretary 
of the Boston Soldiers' Fund in the building of the 
"( entral Charity Bureau," and that the room now 
occupied by s-aid Secretary in the City Hall he, ami 
the same hereby is, assigned for the use of the City 
Engineer, and that the office room now occupied by 
the City Engineer be. and the same hereby is, as- 
signed lor the use of the Lamp Department. " 

Ordered, that there be allowed and paid to Thomas 
W. Davis, City Surveyor, the sum of $500, in addition 
to his present salary, on account oi extra labor and 
services required in his department the present 
rear— said additional amount to he paid to him in 
monthly instalment-, commencing April 1. 1868, and 
ending March 31, 1869; and to lie charged to the 
Department of Engineering and Surveying. 

I. ', VIVC. oil' OF ATLANTIC AVKVl'l!. 

The resolve and order laying out Atlantic avenue, 
a marginal street, from Broad street, at Rowe's wharf, 
tD Commercial street, at Eastern avenue, coming up 
for consideration, was read once. 

.Mr. Jacobs of Ward Five moved a suspension of 
the rules, that the resolve and order may take their 
second reading at the present time. 

Mr. Snow ot Ward Eleven said he trusted the vote 
would not lie taken on go important a matter without 
its being referred to the Committee on street: — the 
usual course of such matter-. 

Mr. I'lynn of Ward Seven stated that the subject 
had been under discussion by the Commit) se, during 
the previous afternoon, on' the reports which had 
been printed, and that the Committee would be ready 
to Immediately report in its favor. 

.Mr. Stevens' of Ward six stated that the Committee 
had considered tiie subject fully, and were unanimous 
in their approval of it. 



Mi-. Snow -aid hi- only object was to have the 
approval of the committee on our record: but if the 
matter had been accomplished in some other wav 
than in a direct reference to the committee, he was 
satisfied. 

The report ofthe committee was r tad, si tting forth 
that the importance of and fact- in reference t> the 

prop --ed avenue bad been -o fully given in the report 
to the other branch, and in the remark- in tnat Board 

that it was deemed unnecessary to give any -pedal 
it s for the passage Of the order-, tin' adoption of 
which was recommended. 

Mr. Wadsworth of Ward Four -ail be did not rise 
to oppose the order, but he wished to ask the Com- 
mittee a question. In the various items of expendit- 
ure given in the report of the C immittee to the other 
branch, there was nothing said of compensation for 
filling up aero-- portions of the docks. 

Mr. Stevens said it was understood that no compen- 
sation oiiuld be obtained for this cause. 

Mr. Keith of War I Fifteen -aid that in a measure 
of more importance than any which had been p 
foralongtime.it was tit that some notice should be 
taken of it in this branch ofthe City Government. In 
what he had to .-ay. he did not expect to add anything 
to what was contained in the report oftrtecommittce or 
in the able remark- addressed to the other branch in 
advocacy of it, by Messrs Talbot, Braman and Paul. 
There were one or two matter-, however, that were 
not touched upon in the reports or speeches. .\ diffi- 
culty which the city had labored under, was, that it 
had'been cramped in time- past for proper space in 
which t i carry on fie triili • from one port! oi of 
the city to the other* The city had been a subject of 
ridicule on account of the narrowness and crooked- 
ness of its streets and for the few accommodations 
which it had for a city with so much wealth and 
capital. This was owing to a irreat degree to the pe- 
cnlar conformation of the territory on which the city 
was laid out, and which would not admit of straigtit 
ai'.d spac'mu- avenues. 

[n many instance.-, it was -aid, these streets had 
been laid out without due consideration, and the 
consequence had been that million- of dollars were 
required lor improvements— much more than was 
necessary to build up some oilier cities. It was 
true that in many cities no foresight was required in 
laying out streets, there being an abundant territory 
mid nothing to prevent the laying out of wide anil 
spacious avenues. During the past year a new -y-t. m 
had been inaugurated, and alter encroaching upon 
the water so that the largest space was redeemed from 
it, it had been determined to take the natural term 
firma for the enlargement of it- bound- ami build 
lilioii it. In accordance with that policy, it i- now 
proposed to annex Dorchester. The avenues project- 
ed and improved were designed to increase the facili- 
ties for locomotion, and etive ;■ proper chance for the 
increase and growth of the city. 

The capital of Boston had been expended in large 
sums, amounting to millions of dollar-, in New York, 
in Chicago and elsewhere, and had been expended in 
building railroads to the West and in that section <i\' 
the country, and the first step in the right direction 
was in the improvement of facilities for business by 
which to draw back some of the advantages of these 
investments. By the opening of the proposed a\ enue 
the distance between the two points would be one- 
third shorter and the time occupied in tiie travel 
would not be more than one-half. '1 .he avenue would 
relieve Broad street of its Crowded condition and 
would enable us to have direct communication with 
the various railroad depots, and permit the establish- 
ment of more warehouses, it would also afford con- 
nections with other avenues leading into the country. 
Thi' proposed annexation of Dorchester was one of 
the important measure- to lie efiected by the increased 
facilities through wide and spacious avenue-. 

Referring to the growth of the country, and to the 
reasonableness of a proportionate growth of this city, 
.Mr. Keith -aid that the most Sanguine and tiie most 
enlarged capacity cannot keep pace with the rapid 
march to prosperity. With the same rates of increase 
as in the last forty years, the population of this coun- 
try ill him hundred years would amount to 250,000,000. 
One Pacific railroad had nearly traversed the conti- 
nent, yet this would be but one of many which would 
be in operation in twenty years. With these means 
of communication, making thi- country the shortest 
route to the Indies and China, the cities of New- 
York. Chicago and even Portland making the greatest 
exertions to secure the advantages to be derived from 
these new facilities for commercial business, there 



PROCEEDING'S OF CITY COUNCIL. 



73 



were no other means open to this city for its future 
prosperity than to be liberal and judicious in its ex- 
penditures for widening its streets and making new 
thoroughfares. 

The commerce of Boston has largely declined with- 
in the last ten years, yet it may be improved and ad- 
vanced. Our greal reliance is upon our manufactures. 
These were spread over a radius of from sixty to one 
hundred miles, and our railroads had been construct- 
ed to increase the facilities to get these manufactures 
to market. In the proportion in which these facilities 
are increased will be the increase of commercial inter- 
ests; and in this way shall we gain back our com- 
merce. What is wanted, further, are the facilities for 
doing business in the city. For these and other rea- 
sons, he was i favor of tie proposed avenue, and he 
hoped it would receive the unanimous vote of the Coun- 
cil. By doing so, the City Council would obtain the 
credit of having carried out the greatest measure for 
the benefit of the city which had beerf adopted in the 
last twenty years. 

Mr. Pickering of Ward Fourteen said he concurred 
fully in the viewsjust expressed, and in further advo- 
cacy of the measure addl'« s&ed the Council as follows : 

It seems to me, Mr. President, that there are two 
questions to be answered before undertaking this 
great work — and in fact any work of a similar char- 
acter. 

In the first place, is it necessary, orexpedient? and 
in the second place, if expedient, will it be worth the 
cost? 

Having these two inquiries in view, I have read 
carefully the report of the committee on the subject, 
together with the remarks of gentlemen in the Board 
of Aldenn -n — and I have likewise examined the map 
of the city with reference exclusively to the proposed 
street. I believe a similar examination on the part of 
gentlemen here will satisfy them that the proposed 
improvement answers satisfactorily both the inquiries 
1 have stated. 

It will be observed, by reference to the map of the 
city recently made and distributed to the members of 
the Government, that the configuration of that part of 
the city seems almost intended by nature for a pas- 
sage or avenue like the one iudie'at id ; and which has 
been partially completed many years since; for if you 
trace Broad street from Federal street bridge to 
Howe's wharf, on one side, and Causeway and Com- 
mercial streets from Warren bridge to Eastern avenue 
wharf, on the other side", you will come to the end of 
what you might suppose to be a continuous marginal 
street, or rat ler you will find that these two avenues 
which it is now proposed to connect in one line com- 
passing that entire portion of the city, if followed out 
will carry you with your heavy teams and other vehi- 
hicle into the narrowest and most crowded streets, 
where, of course, there is the least accommodation for 
such traffic, and where the necessity of widening 
those streets will be upon us earlier than would other- 
Wise be the case, even if it were ever required. I 
think a glance at the map at the point I have indicat- 
ed will furnish an answer to the first inquiry, viz. : 
(he expediency of the proposed street. 

As to the cost of this improvement although I am 
naturally somewhat sceptical of the estimates of those 
persons who are desirous of pushing forward public 
enterprises, and although I cannot bring my mind to 
believe that this city is to carry through what I con- 
ceive to be a most desirable and valuable public im- 
provement, not only at no expense, but at an actual 
profit of nearly a million dollars— still I have no doubt 
that these estimates have been carefully made and I 
have great confidence in the good judgement of the 
Committee. And if the figures they give us are even 
approximately accurate we have surely a safe margin 
upon which to work, and an assurance that the city 
cannot be subjected to any pecuniary loss by the oper- 
ation. I, for one, am willing to favor the project on 
this last supposition, for I believe in its necessity and 
expediency; and if we are to make a million of dol- 
lars by it, so much the better. 

To my own mind I have answered my second inqui- 
ry. I hope 1 have to the minds of other gentlemen. 

I shall take great satisfaction in recording my vote 
in favor of the order. 

The question was taken on the passage of the re- 
solve ami order, which were carried by a unanimous 
vote, fifty one members, all who were present, voting 
in the affirmative, as follows: 

Allen, Batchelder, Bean, Bishop, Bryden. Butler, 
Carney, Denny, Dinsmore, Dolan, Driscoll, Emerson, 
Flanders, Flynn, Franklin, Gray, Harris, Heywood, 
Hopkins, Jacobs, Jenks, Keaney, Keith, Kingsbury, 



Knight, Leighton, Malone, Minon, Morse, Nelson, 
Osbom, Parker, Phelps, Pickering, L. Rice, S. Rice, 
Rockwell, Rogers, Ryan, Snow, Stevens, Thayer, 
Train, Tucker, Wadsworth, Wells, Weston, H. II. 
White, Woollev, Wright, Young. 

Mr. Rockwell of Ward Ten moved that the vote of 
Mr. Phelps of Ward Fourteen be erased from the list 
of yeas in favor of the measure just passed, assigning 
as 'a reason that Mr. Phelps did not reside in the city. 

The Chair stated that he had no official knowledge 
that the gentleman had removed from the city. 

Mr. Rockwell stated that he had the information 
from the gentleman himself. 

The Chair repeated that no official information of 
the fact hail been received, and until it bad, the mo- 
tion could not be entertained. 

ANNEXATION OF DORCHESTER. 

The order requesting the appointment of a commis- 
sion on the sudject of the annexation of a portion or 
the whole of Dorchester to the city of Boston, printed 
City Document So. 138, lsiis, was 'taken up as unfin- 
ished business. 

Mr. Train of Ward Three, in advocacy of the order, 
said be had ventured to introduce it without consul- 
tation with any one, but in consideration of its im- 
portance as forced upon him from his position in con- 
nection with the last Legislature and as a member of 
the Harbor Committee of the City Council. The pres- 
ent City Goverment, he believed* exhibited the most 
comprehension of needed improvements of any which 
had met for many years. 

Heretofore the projected improvements had not 
been adopted with reference to a far reaching policy, 
such as was common in some other cities. It may be 
that no peculiar credit was due to this government, 
but that it arose form the growth of this city up to the 
point which requires a more liberal policy in the fac 
ilities for business. The time was to come when the 
South Bay would be filled up solid, and in thisanex- 
nexatiou of Roxbury, there would be a necessity lor 
the annexation of Dorchester. It would not "be a 
long time before the territory now occupied will be so 
filled up as to require more territory for residences. 
In the various widening and makingof large avenues, 
provision was made for a traffic which must require 
an extension of territory. 

Even admitting that the South Bay wall not be tilled 
up, it must be conceded that the drainage of Roxbury 
must be through Dorchester. In this" drainage the 
system which will be necessary should be adopted at 
once. To make the drainage and harbor improve- 
ment, the control of the water front from Charlestown 
to the Neponset river should be effected. 

Mr. Train said he was not unmindful that the sub- 
ject bail been before the City Government, and that 
a commission was appointed on the subject, but this 
commission seemed to accomplish little, apparently 
because in their view it was desirable to have the in- 
habitants of the neigboring towns also annexed. He 
did not know that the people of Dorchester did not 
want annexation, and if they did not, a lew persons 
should not block the wheels of progress and the best 
interests of this city. The petitions for the annexa- 
tion of Dorchester were from the best citizens of that 
town. In the course of events the annexation of Dor- 
chester must take place, whether the people will it 
or not. He hoped, in any event, that this order would 
pass, and that the commission will proceed on the 
supposition that annexation is virtually accomplish- 
ed. 

Mr. Keith of Ward Fifteen said that having been en- 
gaged for many years in the annexation of new terri. 
tory to Boston, lie was inclined to make a few re- 
marks on the subject. The difficulty in the annexa- 
tion of Roxbury was because of the indifference of the 
city of Boston, laying the labor and expense upon 
the people of Roxbury. The agreement ia the last 
Legislature was that no more annexations should 
take place until the present experiment had been ful- 
ly tested. The result of the annexation of Roxbury 
had been such that no one could now be found wdib 
was opposed to it, and he did not doubt this would 
have a beneficial effect in favor of further annexation. 
Recurring to the manner of laying out new territory 
in New York, be said this measure should be carried 
out through a commission. He accordingly hoped 
that this measure would lie passed. 

The order was passed as follows: 

Whereas, in the opinion of the City Council, it has 
become necessary, in order to complete the system of 
drainage and harbor improvements which have been 
devised for the benefit of Boston by the various Con), 
missions which have had, and now have, these sub- 



74 



rROCEKDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



jects in charge, to annex a portion or the whole <>r 
tin- town of Dorchester to the city of Boston, 

( Ordered, thai his Honor the Mayor be requested to 
appoint a commission of three discreet and intelligent 
persons, who shall carefully examine the subject in 
all its financial, industrial and sanitary relations, 
cause such surveys !<> be made l>y the city Engineer, 
or under his direction, as they may consider necessa- 
ry, and report the result of their doings, with such 
suggestions as they may think proper, t<> the City 
( 'ouncil, as soon as may be. 

COMMTJNICA1 ions. 

An order was received from the School Committee, 
with the request for the erection of a schoolhouse for 
the use of tne Lyman School on the lot of land at the 
corner of Decatur and Paris streets, recently purchas- 
ed by the city lor that purpose. Referred to the ( lorn- 
mittee on l'uhlic Instruction. 

A communication was received from the Board of 
Assessors, requesting the assignment for their use of 

the room now occupied by the Overseer- Of the Poor, 

and soon to be vacated. Referred to the Committee 
on Public Buildings. 

QUESTION <>F PRIVILEGE. 

Mr. Rockwell of Ward Ten rose to a question of 
privilege, which was this: that a gentleman elected 

to this body from Ward Fourteen had removed from 
the city, bill still occupied a seat and voted here. He 
had no feeling whatever toward the gentleman, but it 
has evident that the tacit consent of the Council to 
the occupation of one of its seat- by a person who had 
no more right there than a citizen of Chelsea or Ded- 
ham would establish a precedent likelj to prove high- 
ly pernicious in the future. 

' The gentleman bad. in October, moved away from 
the city to establish his permanent residence else- 
where ; the point had once been raised that he could 
not vole in this body, and the < 'hair had at that time so 
ruled. In order that there should be no mistake 
about it, the gentleman had, ibis evening, been asked 
the question directly whether he resided at Hyde 
Park, and his answer was in the affirmative. It 
seemed to the speaker that this was a case so patent 
to the knowledge of all, that, the ('ouncil ought to have 
sufficient self-respect to request the person in ques- 
tion to leave the chamber. If there was still any 
doubt about it, let the Presideut put the question in 
the presence of the whole < 'ouncil, and it would then 
be iu full possession of every faet which it was nec- 
essary to know. 

As the point of order had twice been raised that 
Mr. I'helpswas not entitled to a seat, and it must be 
known to him that he was trespassing upon the privi- 
leges of the Council, Mr. Bockwell felt called upon to 
Offer the following order: 

ordered, that the President be requested to order the 
removal of all persons wrongfully occupying seats in 
Common Council. 

Mr. Train of Ward Ten said the only course to pur- 
sue to secure the vacation of the seat of the gentle- 
man was by remonstrance, or by an order through a 
report of the ( 'omtnittee on Elections. He would sug- 
gest a modification of the order to that effect. If the 
gentleman should address the chair, in the absence of 
any action or knowledge to the contrary, the chair 
must recognize him as a member. Mr. Train pro- 
posed to amend the order as follows: 

Ordered, that the Committee on Elections inquire 
whether the seat of any member of this bodv has be- 
come vacant, by resignation or otherwise, and report 
thereon. 

The chair stated that the question of the right of the 
gentleman to vote was not decided when the matter 
came up. some weeks since, but that it was ruled it 
was time enough to settle the question when the gen- 
tleman offered to vote. 

Mr. Rockwell read from the cilv charter, to show 
that the gentleman could not hold his seat after re. 
moving from the city. 

MrOsborn oi Ward Six said there was a doubtful- 
ness about the phraseology in the charter, and on that 
account, in the revised city charter, which was not 
passed by the last Legislature, that phraseology was 
changed,' and rendered less ambiguous. 

.Mr. Rockwell replied that he thought the language 
of the charter was sufficiently dear; and he did not 
think it necessary to refer the matter to the Committee 
on Elections. Cinder ordinary circumstances of inqui- 
ry or investigation, the Committee are the eyes and 
ears of the body ; but in this case the Council saw and 
heard for itself, and knew all the facts now. There 
was bit one cours'- lo pursue : and that was, to de- 



clare a compulsory vacation of the seat lo which the 
gentleman improperly adhered. 

Mr. Keith of Ward fifteen read from the Genera] 
Statutes, that a person removing from a town in which 
he held office, the removal vacated the office. 

The amendment was adopted, and the amended or- 
der was passed. 

ORDERS l' vssF.j). 

On motion of Mr. Wright of Ward Twelve, 

Ordered, that there be allowed and paid to Wash- 
ington P. t.'regg, Clerk of the Common Council, $400 

for extra services in preparing for publication the 
journal of proceedings of the Common Council. 

On motion ol Mr. Bean of Ward Eleven, ordered, 
that the Committee on Public Buildings be authorized 
to furnish to the Charter Street Primary school heat- 
ing apparatus and school furniture, at "an expense of 
$2000, lo be charged to the appropriation for primary 
schools. i 

On motion of Mr. Bean, 

ordered, that His Honor the Mayor be authorized 
to convey to Peter Reynolds for the estate No. 4(i Mar- 
ion street surrendered to the city by him, the estate 
surrendered by Maurice Lynch at the corner of Fer- 
dinand and Marion streets! the said Reynolds to pay 
the difference in the appraised value of 'the estates and 
a proportion of the benefits by the widening of said 
street. 
On motion of Mr. Snow of Ward Eleven- 
Ordered, that the Trustees of the City Hospital be 
authorized to report in print, and that 1300 copies of 
the report be printed. 
Adjourned. 



Proceedings of Beard of Aldermen, 



DEC. 21, 18GS. 



The regular weekly meeting of the Board of Alder- 
men was held this afternoon, His Honor Mayor Shurt- 
leff presiding. 

APPOINTMENTS CONFIRM ED. 

Sergeant James W. Twombly, to be Lieutenant of 
Police; Joseph B. Blanchard, police officer, to be 
Sergeant of Police. 

John Sullivan, special police officer, without pay, 
at St. Stephen's Church. 

PETITIONS PRESENTED AND REFERRED. 

John Rindge, for leave to maintain a skating rink 
for public amusement on Tremont street. Referred 
to Committee on Licenses. 

W. 15. Sewall, for apportionment of betterments on 
Brimmer street. 

Jonathan Jones, for apportionment of assessment 
for betterments on liowker street. 

Severally referred to the Committee on Streets. 

Benjamin T. Gould, for abatement of assessment 
for a sewer in Wall street. Referred to Committee 
on Sewers. 

Hugh A. Madden and others, against location of 
a steam engine on Way street. Referred to Com- 
mittee on steam Engines. 

John Kennealy, for auctioneer's license at 568 
Washington street. Referred to Committee on Li- 
censes. 

Frank M. Pratt, for abatement of tax for 1867, Re- 
ferred to Joint Committee on Assessor's Depart- 
ment. 

1). McDevitt and others that the votes in Ward One 
for inspectors of elections be recounted. Referred to 
Alderman White and Seaver. 

Charles Blinker and others, for a gas lamp at coi- 
ner of Centre and Cedar streets. Referred to Com- 
mittee on Lamps. 

NOTICES OF INTENTIONS TO BUILD. 

John R.Hall, on Temple place: Henry Bailey, Sum- 
mer street, opposite Davis street; Howard A. Doe, 
Fifth street, betwtii L and M streets; S. H. L. Pierce, 
Seventh street, between B and C streets: also on Sul- 



PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



75 



livnn street, opposite Lark street. 
ed to tin- Committee on Streets. 



Severally Rcferr- 



FOK 



IHilSE OF 



INCREASE OF APPROPRIATION 
CORRECTION. 

A communication was received from the Directors 
of Public Institutions, asking for an increase of the 
appropriation lor the workshops of the House of 
Correction to the amount of $15,000. The directors 
si aie i hat the appropriation is required for machinery, 
piping, shafting, belting, shop fixtures. Referred to 
Committee on Public Institutions. 

SOUP-HOUSES FOB THE POOR. 

The Ma\ or submitted the follow inn- communication : 

BOSTON, Dec. 21, 1868. 

To the Board of Aldermen of tin- City of Boston: 

[n view of the great suffering oi the worthy i r of 

this city, which reasonably may he expected liminn- 
the approaching inclement season, ami in order to 
ameliorate their helpless condition, as well as to 
lessen the tendency to petty crimes which too frequent- 
ly arise in conseqtiei c • <>i extreme destitution, 1 most 
resp (Ctfullj SUgs'esl that some action he taken by Hie 
Board for the establishment of soup-houses ami the 
distribution of nourishing food to the needy. 

xatii'l r>. Shurteff, Mayor. 

<)n motion of Alderman White, it was 

ordered, That a Committee of this Board he ap» 
pointed to make such arrangements as they deem ex- 
pedient for the distribution of soup from the several 
Police stations to persons known to he in necessi- 
tous circumstances during the months of January, 
February and Maich, at an expense not exceeding 
93000 — half to he charged to the appropriation for 
Health ami half to the appropriation lor Police. 

Alderman White and Fairbanks were appointed 
the Committee under the order. 

FAST BOSTON FEBBT TRAVEL. 

Alderman Seaver, from the Committee on Ferries, 
under the order ofi'ie Board to ascertain the amount 
of travel over the East Boston ferries for a term of 
not less than eight days, made a report, in detail ; 

The siaicmeni shows the travel for eleven days, as 
follows: Dec. 7— old Ferry receipts$296 40; People's 
FeiTV, $98 lo; total $394 50. Dec. 8— Old Ferry, 
$335 03; People's $122 46; total, $457 4!). Dee. 9-Old 
Ferrv, $343 77; People's $106 36; total, $450 13. Dee. 
10— Old Ferry, 329 Oil : People's. i«l is 21 ; total, * (47 30. 
Dec. 11— Old Terry, $324 90; People's, $133 16; total, 
$455 :$7. Dee. 12— Old Ferrv. $36588; People's, $130 83 ; 
total, $496 71. Dec. 13— Old Ferry, $164 75; People's, 
$2606; total. $190 81. Dee. 14— (Id Ferrv, $354 19; 
People's, $123 i:S; tOtal,466 62. Dee. lo— Old Ferrv, 
$337 32; People's $120 99; total, *4.">s 31. Dec 16— 
Old Ferry, 358 76; People's, $116 -ll; total, $474 us. 
Dec. 17— Oil Ferry, $335 74; People's, $119 40; total, 

S4.V> II. 

The average over the old ferry each day was s'!22 (17; 
People's. $109 on: total average, s4Sl .">7. ' The average 
number of cars passing each day was 1602; foot pass- 
engers, 10,010. 

The report was accepted, and ordered to he print- 
ed. 

INCREASE OF FERRY TOLLS. 

The hearing of remonstrance against the petition 
for increase of tolls ou the East Boston terries was 
taken up by assignment. 

Mr. E. T. Loring opposed the raising of tolls, con- 
tending that it would be injurious to business; that 
the argument for increase by reference to the New- 
York ami Brookline ferries was not applicable to this 
city, inasmuch as those cities were in too different 
counties, while this ferry was in Boston solely. Fur- 
ther accommodations, becontended, wire demand id, 
in justice to East Boston, while continued facilities 
were given id' access to South Boston. Instead of 
raising the tolls, the city should pay the necessary 
amount for the support of the ferry out of the public 
treasury. He hoped however, the subject would he 
postponed, that he might make further preparation, 
and appear by council for the interests which he 
represented. 

Daniel D. Kelley said the gentlemen who lasl spoke 
did not fully represent the people of East Boston, so 
far as the travel was concerned, over the old ferry. 
There were several reasons why there was not. more 
travel over the new ferry then the old one — that of 
the number of boats, the uncertainty of the time of 
starting in the morning, ami the travel of the cars 
over the old one. Kul with the same facilities, there 
would he as much or more travel over the new ferrv, 



which in other respects has the greater advantage. 
He did not. however, ask that the company should 
furnish the. means of travel at their expense. In pro- 
viding other facilities of travel, in streets, toother sec- 
tions of the city, it is not generally the policy to wail 
until new streets are asked for/but to lay out all 
which the public good requires. There was 'no good 
reason why the city should not furnish the people of 
East Boston w ith facilities equal to those for other 
parts of the city. 

Andrew Hall said the true ground to be assumed 
was that the people of Fast. Boston should have fur- 
ther accommodations, without an increase of tolls. 
He did not believe that the statement which had been 
furnished showed the true amount of travel to Fast 
Boston, for it was taken at a time of the year when 
the travel was less thai: the average. He hail beard 
that in November the receipts were very large, more 
than heretofore. 

In answer to F. E. Parker, council for the ferry 
company, Mr. Hall said he was superintendent the 
year before the ferry came into the hands of the pres- 
ent company, but so far as the earnings were dispos- 
ed of, he knew nothing personally, nor more than 
could be ascertained from the annual rep< r;s. 

Edward Wright wished the Board to recognize the 
fact that this ferry had neen a subject of complaint 
for twelve years ; that the value of property in East 
Huston of every description was less than in any 
other section, although in sonic respects the natural 
advantages were greater. With all these natural 
advantages business men had gone to Portland, 
Saco and elsewhere, to obtain facilities for their busi- 
ness. Without discussing the matter of two or three 
cents for tolls, it would he assumed that with all the 
natural advantages and for the benefit of the city, it 
was the duty of the city to own the ferry ; it would be 
the cheapest, most economical measure. The ques- 
tion was as plain as that of widening of Tremont 
street, and is as obligatory upon the city. As such 
for the interests of tiie city, this measure should be 
taken now, ami the people of lOasi Boston were able 
to establish this tact by both money and argument. 

Edward F. Porter, in reference to certain" positions 
maintained by the new Ferry Company, declared on 
his own knowledge that the city had done all that it 
had agreed to, and fulfilled its' on ligations. He did 
not believe that the increase of tolls which was asked 
lor was necessary, although thereniightbea necessity 
tor a modification. There should be an increase of 
tolls on heavy teaming, while on foot passengers anil 
light travelling there ought to he a decrease, and it 
might he done to advantage, with this modification, 
be believed that the ferry might be made to pay. 
The expenditures he did think might be object- 
ed to. anil one of those Was Hie heavy charges of coun- 
sel, in going to the Legislature and for other purposes. 
It was doubtful in his own mind whether the travel 
could be equally divided by putting two boats on each 
ferry, yet much might be done towards it should the 
ears run as formerly over the. new ferry. He hoped 
the Board would by no means increase the tolls as 
was asked for, but lake sufficient time for a modifica- 
tion, and if necessary make such an increase as might 
be required. There should be a determination of the 
facilities for some years to come, so that the people 
might know upon what they were to depend. With 
this question settled there would be an encourage- 
ment to people to take up their residences and do 
business in East Boston, which there cannot be under 
the present arrangements, and there would be an in- 
creased valuation of the property in that section of the 
citv. 

Jacob A. Dresser desired to remonstrate against in- 
crease of tolls, and wished the' Board to look al the 
subject as a matter of interest to Boston, and not East 
Huston merely. During the last year there had been 
an enlargement of the bounds of the city, and it would 
not be advocated as good policy to erect a wall against, 
frequent communication with thai new section of the 
city. For the same reason it could not be contended 
that it will he srood policy to raise obstructions to com- 
munication with East Boston. He had never been an 
advocate of free ferries, and would not ask for su«h a 
measure, yet he could nol see why tin' city should not 
pay something out of its treasury' toward the support 
of the ferries, as well as widen and lay out new streets 
for Hie facilitating of business in other sections of the 
citv. 

Paul Curtis made some statements relative to the 
inconveniences of the travel across the new ferry. 

II. A. Stevens, ex-alderman stated that there had 
always been in the City Government a prejudice 



7(> 



PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



against the terry matter-. II;- 'li<l not agree altogether 
with tlic statement of Judge Wright that no good had 
resulted from the purchase of the ferry avenues, for 
thai was a commencement of good. Th°re was a time 
when the new ferry property could have been pur- 
chased for $50,000, and if it had been done the other 
(■mild also have been purchased within a short time. 
One of the difficulties experienced was in the uncer- 
tainty Oi'travel over the new ferry, and from the con- 
stant statements that were made that as it was but an 
experiment, the boats would soon stop. If the mem 
here of this Board would only go down to the ferry at 
this time of day, and see the number of persons wait- 
ing in the cold) both foot passengers and teams, I lie 
difficulty would be likely to be remedied at once. If 
the boats were run over the new ferry at a late hour, 
as over the other, the Metropolitan Railroad Company 
would be willing to run their ears over that ferry, but 
under the present regulations they could not do SO, for 
they could not run at so late an hour as they now run. 

in answer to Mr. Parker, Mr. Stevens said he would 
have equal facilities at both ferries. 

Mr. Kclley hoped this matter would be recommitted 
before it was finally disposed of) when maps should 
be provided and such a hearing take place as would 
fullv satisfy the Board in relation to the subject. 

Oil motion of Alderman White the whole subject 
was recommitted. 

The hearing on the petition of the Metropolitan 
Railroad Co. for a location in Dock square, was taken 
up by assignment, when, no one appearing, the re- 
port was reeommittid. 

UNFINISHED BUSINESS. 

The unfinished business of the last meeting was 
taken up. when the following orders werapassed : 

Order that the Committee on County Accounts be 
authorized to contract with some suitable person or 
persons to make a classified index to the depositions 
and executions recorded in the office ol the Register 
of Deeds, from 1800 to 18(5!; also to make an index to 
the sales of real estate in the county of Suffolk, for 
non-payment of taxes, from the commencement of 
.such sales to the present time; also for a continuance 
of the index of plans ; also for recopying and repairing 
old indexes — the expense of doing all said work not 
to exceed $2.")00. 

Order authorizing the Committee on County Ac- 
counts to contract for making classified Indices of 
Grantors in Suffolk Registry of Deeds from Vol. X. 
to the year 1800, at the cost Of five rents jyer name. 

Order for the paving of Federal Street from Old 
Colony & Newport Railroad to Dorchester, at an 
estimated cost of $12,000. 

COMMON COUNCIL PAPERS. 

l'ctitions from the Common Council were referred 
in concurrence. 

The following orders were passed in concurrence. 

Order to pay Washington P. Gregg- four hundred 
dollars for extra services. 

Order to convey estate 46 Marion street to Patrick 
Reynolds, on certain conditions. 

Order for Trustees of City Hospital to report in 
print. 

Onler to furnish heating apparatus and furniture 
for Charter street Primary Schoolhouse, at a cost of 
$-2000 

Preamble and order in favor of the appointment of 
Commissioners to consider the expediency of the 
annexation of the whole or part of Dorchester to 
Boston. City Doc. 138. 

The request of School Committee for a new 
Schoolhouse. in Lyman District was referred to 
( 'onnnittee on Public Instruction. 

REPORTS OF COMMITTEES. 

Alderman Talbot, from the Committee on Streets, 
reported no action necessary on sundry notice of 
intention to build. Accepted. 

Alderman White, from the Committee on Licenses, 
reported in favor of licenses to parties named as 
innholders, victuallers, &c. Severally accepted. 

Also, granting license to C. A. Richards for a bil- 
liard-room in the Albemarl House. Accepted. 

Alderman James from the Committee on Paving, 
reported leave to withdraw, at their own request, on 
petition of O. W. Holmes and others, for the laying of 
tracks of the Metropolitan railroad in Charles Street, 
the city having- no jurisdiction in the matter. Ac- 
cepted. 

Also, i-eference to the Committee on Claims on the 
petition of Jairus Pratt and wile for damages by 
change of grade of Eutaw street. Accepted. 



Alderman While, from the ( oramtttee on Public 

Instruction, on the request of the (School Committee 

for a lot of land on Appleton street for a primary 
scl Ihouse, reported inexpedient to purchase said 

lot while the city owns land on Columbus avenue 
more favorably situated for the purpose, The com- 
mittee recommended the subject to the early attention 
of the next City Council. Accepted ami sent down 
for concurrence. 

'I'he same committee, on the recommitted report, 
in relal ion to the purchase of land adjoining Lincoln 
Schoolhouse yard, souih Boston, reported refere 
to the next City Council. Accepted and sent down. 

Alderman Richards, form the Committee on tin. 
Fire Department, reported in favor of several appli- 
cation for petroleum licenses. Accepted. 

Alderman White from the Committee on Licenses, 
on the petiton of John Kludge tor leave to maintain a 
Skating Rink on Tremonl street, made a report, in 
whi h they state that having examined the structure 
they regard it safe for the public, and they recommend 
that the petitioner have leave to open the same, as 
requested. Accompanying the report was a communi- 
cation from the City Engineer, in which he refers 
to his report of Oct. "12, 1868, and to the faults and 
defects of the original structure, and proceeds as 
follows : 

At the request of the Superintendent and some of 
the proprietors, I have examined the new structure 
from time to time, and have had a good opportunity 
to observe the character of the materials and work- 
manship as the work has progressed. In regard to 
the foundations, the utmost care has been taken; all 
the Roxbury stone foundations have been removed; 
additional piles driven, the old ones tested and cut ofl 
at a lower level, and new walls of block granite laid 
in cement have been substituted lor the Roxbury 
stone walls which were removed. The plans for 
rebuilding above the foundations which were de- 
scribed in the report above referred to, have been car- 
ried out faithfully, and the work done in the most 
thorough manner. 

The architect, Mr. Preston, has given to the execu- 
ton of the work a most faithful oversight, and I am 
certain he has done everything in his power to erect, a 
building substantial and" secure, beyond a question, 
and I do not hesitate to say that the public may 
have entire confidence in the safety of the present 
structure. 

The report was accepted. 

Alderman Messinger, from the Committee on 
Health, reported in favor of revoking the licenses of 
Edward Nixon, Patrick Cassidy and Edward Demp- 
sey, as collCCters of grease and bones. Accepted. 

Also an order, which was passed, instructing the 
Superintendent of Health to furnish fourteen loads of 
ashes for filling a cellar in the North End Block at a 
charge of fifty cents per load. 

BOUNDARY LIKE OF BROOKLINE. 

Alderman firaman, from the Committee on the 
Subject of Changing the Boundary Line between this 
City and Brooklinc, made a report as follows: 

"To perfect the system of drainage and streets 
devised for the territory lying between Tremout 
street and the Milldam, it is highly important that this 
city should have the control of Western avenue and 
the low lands in the vicinity of Muddy Brook. With 
this view the committee have caused* surveys to be 
made, and have proposed t > the selectmen of Brook- 
line a change in the present boundary line to corres- 
pond to the following description. 

Beginning at a point iu the centre of the channel of 
Charles river on the boundary line between the town 
of Brookline and the city of Cambridge, where the 
westerly line of St. Mary's street, in the town of 
Brookline, extended in a northerly direction would 
intersect the said boundary line; thence running 
southwardly by the westerly line of the said st. Mary's 
street extended, to the southerly line of Brighton 
avenue; thence continuing in the same direction bv 
the westerly line of St. Mary's street to the northerly 
line of Ivy street: thence turning a little and running 
southeasterly by the southwesterly line of St. Mary's 
Street, and by the continuation of tin' same to the 
northwesterly line of the location of the Brookline 
Branch of the Boston & Albany Railroad: thence 
southwesterly by the northwesterly line of the location 
of the said Railroad, fo the devision line between 
land of Thomas Howe and land formerly of Mellen; 
thence across the said Railroad to the easterly line of 
the location thereof, where the southerly line of a 
private passageway, lying northwardly of Pearl place 
so (called), and running from the said Railroad to 



PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



77 



Brookline avenue, intersects the said easterly line 
of said location ; thence by the southerly line of the 
saiil passageway to the" northwesterly line of the 
said brookline avenue; thence southwesterly by the 
northwesterly line of Brookline avenue to Washing- 
ton street, and continuing in the same direction 
across Washington street to the southerly line thereof; 
thence eastwardlyby the southerly line of Washington 
street to the northwesterly line of Pond avenue; 
thence across Poud avenue, at right angles to the 
same, to the southeasterly line thereof, thence suoth- 
west'rlv bv the southeasterly line of Pond avenue, 
till the said line intersects the easterly line of Back 
street, or the Old Mill road (so called) : thence south- 
ward!; by the easterly line of the said Old Mill roan, 
till it intersects the easterly line Of said Pond avenue; 
thence southwardly by theeastsrly line <>f said Pond 
avenue till it intersects the boundary line between 
the City of Boston and the town of West Roxbnry, 
extended northwesterly to Pond avenue, thence 
southeasterly by the said boundary line, extended to 
the pros, Mit westerly terminus thereof. 

The new line above described will, we believe, be 
satisfactory to the town of Brookline. It transfers 
about three hundred acres of land, lieret >fore in that 
town, to the jurisdiction of this city. 

An act will be prepared by the City Solicitor and 
submitted, with the Mayor's petition, 1 1 the next Leg- 
islature. J. 1). 15RAMAN, 

Newton Talbot, 
Bent, f. Stevens, 
Michael Carney, 
Augustus Parker. 

Committee." 

ORDERS PASSED. 
Order to pay Leonard Ware $9230 10 for land taken 
to widen High street. 

Order to pay to James Carbrev s?UO0 for land taken 
ami damages occasioned by the widening of Congress 
street. 

Order to pay John P. Ilealey and Richard C. Green- 
leaf, trust 'es under the will Of James II. Poster, de- 
c ^ised, S17.U 56 for land taken and damages occasion- 
ed bv the widening of Bedford street. 

Order to pay Augustus C. Richmond $20 for land 
taken and damages occasioned by the widening of 
Dorchester Street. 

Order to pay John C. Haynes $8985 for land taken 
and damages' occasioned by the widening of High 
street. 

Order that the Committee on Police be authorized 
to furnish a fatigue cap to each member of the Police 
Department, to be worn during the inclement season, 
the exp mse thereof not to exceed the sum of $800, and 
to be charged to the appropriation for police. 

Order that the Committee on Armories be author- 
ized to expend in fitting up the armory building, East 
Boston, a sum not exceeding $200 in addition to the 
amount heretofore allowed for that object —said 
amount to be charged to the appropriation for armo- 
ries. 

ORDER TO BUILD ATLANTIC AVENUE. 

Ordered, that the Superintendent of Street, under 
the direction of tie Committee on Paving, be author- 
ized to build Atlantic, avenue as laid out by the Board 
of Aldermen, Dec. IS, 1868, the expense to 'be $300,000, 
to lie charged to the appropriation for Atlantic aven- 
ue. 

Adjourned. 



Proceedings of the Common Council, 



DEC- 2Ji, 1868. 



The regular weekly meeting of the Common Council 
was held this evening, Charles II. Allen, the Presi- 
dent, in the chair. 

PAPERS FROM THE BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 

The petitions of Frank M. Pratt, for abatement of 
tax, and of Jairus Pratt and wife, for damages for 
change of street grade, were referred in concurrence. 



The following papers were also acted upon in con- 
currence : 

Request of the Directors of Public, Institutions for 
an additional appropriation of $15,000, to complete the 
new workshop at the House of Correction. 

Reports that the Request of the School Committee, 
for the city to purchase land on Appleton street, 
whereon to erect a primary schoolhouse ; and the re- 
ports in relation to the purchase of land adjoining the 
Lincoln School yard, be referred to the next City 
Council. 

Report on changing the boundary line between 
Boston and Brookline, and transferring three hundred 
acres of land in that town lo the jurisdiction of the 
city. Printed Cily Document No. 142, 1868. 
COMMUNICATION. 

A communication was received from the Auditor, 
stating that the appropriation for incidental expenses 
was hardly sufficient to meet the demands on the 1st 
of January, and that $10,000 more will be required. 
Referred to the Committee on Finance. 

RESIGNATION OF A MEMBER. 

Mr. Wilson of Ward Twelve communicated the re- 
signation of Mr. II. B. Phelps, as a member of the 
Council from Ward Fourteen, on account of his re- 
in >val to Hyde Park, stating in doing so that Mr. 
Phelps was advised bv persons in bis ward not to pre- 
sent it, although dated in October, for the reason that 
it would not be desirable at so late a period in the 
year to fill the vacancy. 

The resignation was accepted. 

Mr. Osborn, from the Committee on Elections, said 
a report bad been prepared, declaring the seat vacant, 
but from the action of the Council, no further action 
would be necessary on the subject. 

Mr. Rockwell of Ward Ten made an explanation in 
relation to his course on the subject, declaring that he 
bad no personal feeling in the matter, ,• s some persons 
had supposed, but acted in view of the provisions of 
the city charter. 

An order was adopted that a message be sent to the 
Board of Alderman, to inform the Hoard that a vacan- 
cy exists in the Common Council by the resignation of 
Mr. Phelps as a member from Ward Fourteen. 

REPORTS OF COMMITTEES. 
Mr. Wadsworth, from the Committee on Claims, re- 
ported an order for the payment of $1000 to Mrs. R. 
Emilie Fiske, wife of Josiab. Fiske, for injuries receiv- 
ed from falling on the ice on the sidewalk in Broad- 
way, Feb. 11, 1668. The order was read twice and 
passed. 

WIDENING OF HANOVER STREET. 
Mr. Stevens, from the Committee on streets of the 
Common Council, to whom were referred the resolve 
and orders for the widening of Hanover street from 
Court street lo Blackstone street, at an estimated ex- 
pense of $500,000, submitted a report in print, signed 
by all the members of the committee. The report 
says : 

It has been the policy of the city, for the last fifteen 
years, to widen Hanover street whenever an oppor- 
tunity offered to take portions of estates before the 
erection of new buildings. As a consequence of doing 
the work in that way, the street is now' very irreg- 
ular; and during the last two or three years the sub- 
ject of making it a uniform width of sixty feet from 
Commercial street to Court street, a distance of about 
3200 feet, has been seriously considered. 

The present width of roadway, for a distance of 
about one hundred and thirty feet below Court street, 
varies from nineteen to twenty-four feet. From this 
point to Union street, the width is from twenty-two 
to thirty-two feet; from Union street to Blackstone 
street, about twenty-three feet; from Salem street to 
Clark street, sixteen to twenty feet; from Clark street 
to Commercial street, about twenty- six feet. 

The committee state that they gave a full bearing 
to the petitioners and remonstrants, principally the 
owners and occupants of estates on the street.' The 
evidence of petitioners went to show that owing to 
its present condition as amain thoroughfare for the 
northerly section of the city, travel was greatly im- 
peded and transportation of merchandise delayed; 
the w idening of the street would be of immense benefit 
to the North End, business and travel which had been 
driven elsewhere would return, property would be 
greatly increased in value, and a large proportion of 
the expense of widening could be assessed in better- 
ments. 

The evidence of remonstrants was to show that 
with the exception of a few rods at the head of the 



78 



PROC'KKIMNfiS OF CITY COUNflL. 



street, travel was not obstructed above Blackstone 
street ; that, for the business carried on in the street, 
the present width was sufficient; that, in many cases, 
the widening would be an injury rather than a bene- 
fit; that a large proportion of the travel to ;m<l from 
the Northern depots, Cbarlestown, Chelsea and Bast 
Boston, passed through Sudbury, Friend, Union, 
Blackstone and Commercial streets, instead of through 
Hanover street; that, if the street was widened to 
sixtj feet, another horse railroad would be laid over 
it, and the accommodations to general travel would 
be diminished rather than increased ; that many new 
and valuable buildings would be destroyed by the 
present plan of widening; and thai the expense 
would be altogether beyond the benefit that would 
accrue to the abutters or tin' public 

The committee agree thai the evidence, conflicting 
on all other point-, went to show the immediate ne- 
cessity for widening at the head of the street. This 
might be accomplished by taking portions of three 
estates on the southerly Bide, extending about one 
hundred and thirty feet below Courl street, sufficient 
to make the width between the buildings fifty feet. 

The expense would not exceed $80,000 or $90,000, 
and the beneiit would be far greater, in proportion to 
the cost, than the widening at any other point. The 
number of square feet taken for the w idening between 
Court and Biackstone streets, is about iT.TUT: and the 
estimated expenes for land taken and damages oc- 
casioned would be something over twenty-eight dol- 
lars per foot. While many of the owners of estates 
on the street have expressed their entire willingness 
to pay any reasonable assessment for betterment, it 
may be presumed that the amount returned to the 
city treasury in that way would tall tar short of the 
actual expense. 

The committee stated that great changes are about 
fo be made in the transportation ofheavy merchandise 
through the streets of the city, and in view of the ac- 
tion of the City Council in laying out Atlantic avenue, 
which will obviate the necessity of widening the in- 
terior thoroughfares in the old portions of the city, 
they do not deem it expedient to recommend the 
widening of Hanover street according to the plan of 
the Board of Aldermen. 

As the Council can only concur or non-concur in 
the action of the Board of Aldermen, the Committee, 
without desiring to be understood as expressing any 
opinion against the ultimate necessity for widening 
the street through its entiie length, would respect- 
lully recommend the Council to non-concur, and re- 
turn the papers to the Board of Aldermen, to enable 
them to modify the plan of widening as above sug- 
gested. 

Mr. liice of Ward Four moved the reference of the 
matter to the next City Council. 

Mr. Flynn of Ward Seven hoped the motion would 
be taken on the report of the 1 committee to non-concur 
■with the Board of Aldermen. 

The Chair was of the opinion that the question 
must simply be that of concurrence or non-concurr- 
ence. 

Mr. Stevens suggested whether to lay the subject 
on the table would not be in effect that of 'going over 
t i the next Council. 

The Chair ruled that such a motion would be in or- 
der. 

The report was ordered to be placed on file, and 
.Mr. Rice modified his motion to lay the order on the 
table, which was carried. 

Mr. Stevens, from the same committee, also submit- 
ted in print the resolve and orders for the extension 
of Broadway from Federal street to Albany street, at 
high grade, sixty feet in width. The report was 
signed by all the members of the committee. After 
stating the estimates of expenses and the differences 
in the reports of the last and present year, in favor of 
the latter, the committee state: At a hearing given by 
the committee a large number of the most substantial 
citizens of South Boston appeared to advocate the 
proposed extension ; but nota single person appeared 
to oppose it; and, so far as the committee could learn, 
the sentiment in favor of the measure was unanimous. 
[t was stated b3 those who have the largest interest 
in the welfare of South Boston that, if it was a corpora- 
tion by itself, the extension of Broadway would be or- 
dered without the delay of a single day. 

Tin' valuation of real and personal estate in South 
Boston, in 1804, amounted to $139,200. in 1868 the as- 
sessors' valuation of Ward 12 alone, amounted to 
si 1,883, 100 — an increase of $1,628,400 over the valuation 

of the previous J ear— and the whole valuation forthat 
section amounted to about $18,000,000. 



* * * It appears from the retUTDB of the Superin- 
tendents, that the number oi vessels which passed 
through the bridges to South Boston, in i-i;7. was as 
follow- Mount Washington Avenue Bridge, 9248; 
Federal street Bridge, 7100; Dover Street Bridge, 
2005. it is estimated that the draw of the Broadway 
bridge would be opened about 8900 times in the course 
of a year,— -making about ten times each day of twen- 
ty-four hours. 

* * * In 1865 an official record was made of the 
travel over Federal street Bridge in one day, by which 
it appeared that the number of foot passengers wa- 
14,300, and the number of carriages 8903. From a rec- 
ord made last year, it appeared that the number of 
teams which passed over the bridge in one daw from 
-ix o'clock A. M. to six o'clock P. M., wa- about oOOn, 
and the number of horse cars -even hundred and thir- 
ty. 

Some of the largest owners of real e-tate have stated 
their willingness to pay their proportion of the expense 
of building a new avenue, and their belief that the in- 
creased value of the property in south Boston would 
p:i,\ taxes sufficient to meet the interest of a loan for 
the purpose, and establish a sinking fond to pay the 
principal in a few year-. 

It is estinmted that direct assessments may be made 
on the estates on Broadway sufficient to cover at least 
half the expense tor land damages, viz., $125,000. 

From the records in the Assessors' Department, it 

appears that there are 12,222,118 square feet of vacant 
land in Ward Twelve, valued at $1,223,300; about ten 
cents per foot. In Ward Eleven there are 1,969,308 
square feet of vacant land, valued at $1,317,535; about 
Sixty-six and two-thirds cent- per foot. 

South Boston is as near the business portion of the 
city as Ward Eleven, and there i- no reason why the 
uplands in South Boston should not be as desirable 
for residences as the filled Hats in Ward Eleven, if 
proper accommodations for travel are afforded. 

In conclusion the committee would state, that they 
tire satisfied that the present facilities for travel be- 
tween South Boston and the city proper are entirely 
inadequate; that the construction of an additional 
thoroughfare, sooner or later, is inevitable; and that 
the present is more favorable for the commencement 
of the work than any future time. 

The report was accepted and placed on tile, when 
the orders accompanying document 120. were read 
once, and ordered to a second reading. 

Mr. Jenks of Ward Three moved that they be laid 
on the table. 

The motion was lost— is to 30. 

The question recurring upon their passage — 

Mr. Wad-worth of Ward Four referred to the differ- 
ent statements of t'ae committees the la-t ami the pres- 
ent year. He supposed the street would eventually 
be continued to Park square, at a cost of two and a 
half millions of dollars. There had already been a 
large sum expended to widen Federal street. Mount 
Washington avenue would also be extended, and the 
Eastern avenue be built at some time, and under the 
circumstances he did not see how he could vote for 
this measure. 

Mr. Jacobs of Ward Five said the subject had been 
before the Council a long- time, and he had but to 
give reasons why he should vote for the measure. 
The people of South Boston were unanimously in fa- 
vor of it, and the other avenues to South Boston are 
uncomfortably crowded, so as to make traveling dan- 
gerous. Aside from the justice and equity of the 
matter, it should be carried out as a measure of 
economy and advantage to the city. Taking the val- 
uation of the property of that section, as compared 
with other sections, and it will be found there is a 
large margin for increase and profit. So far as the 
prospective avenues are concerned, there was little 
prospect of their consummation, and this was now 
demanded to meet the wants of the times. 

Mr. Rice of Ward Nine was not opposed to the ex- 
tension of Broadway, but to the proposed termination 
at Albany street. If not continued further it would 
eventually cost an immensely greater sum than it will 
at the present time. If no more is now done, lie could 
not see how the betterments could be obtained for the 
payment of any proper portion of the expense, and it 
would not be a public improvement at all. 

Mr. Stevens, of the committee, said the people of 
South Boston were very generally in favor Ofthe meas. 
ure. In regard to the cost, he believed that the figur- 
es now given were more to be relied upon than those 
of last year. 

Mr. Darrow ot'Ward Eight said the measure had 
been long under consideration, and should be carried 



PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



79 



out, for the people of South Boston had not a decent 
avenue over which they could travel. If it had been 
adopted* years ago, the public lands would have been 
disposed of, and the property in that section would 
have been much increased in value. 

Mr. .snow of Ward Eleven said he bad been disposed 
to view the widening of Hanover .street and the 
extension of Broadway as among the most import- 
ant measures of the City Government. After reflec- 
tion on the subject ami an examination of the various 
plans which bad been under consideration, he was of 
opinion that the widening of Dover street and the 
bridge could be marie at a comparatively small ex- 
p 'use, and that it would meet the wants of the people 
of South Boston for many years to come. Then there 
were other avenues contemplated which would fur- 
nish some accommodation. For these reasons he 
could not support this measure. 

Mr. Wright of Ward Twelve said the matter came 
before the City Government in 1865, when the commit- 
tee of this branch were unanimously in favor of it. 
In 181)7, a report was made in its favor. The commit- 
tees of both branches the present year have also re- 
ported in favor of it. The question is, whether there 
IS any public necessity for the proposed avenue. The 
people of South Boston believe there is, as a further 
means of access to the city, and for the increase of 
the value of thtir property, as well as that of the city. 
He claimed that some of the finest locations for 
dwellings, and the most beautiful prospects, could be 
found there, and yet for thirty years there bad been 
little improvement in property, while there was a 
large advance elsewhere, at greater distances from 
the centre ot the city and in less eligible locations. 

The people of South Boston bad literally to tight 
for the Federal Street bridge, and that was really the 
only available avenue to them and to all the inhabi. 
fonts Of the south shore beyond them. Interested 
parties in Raxbury and along the South Bay opposed 
the project. All public improvements were calculat- 
ed to make some people better off, and should do so, 
but the fear of benefiting some one led to opposition, 
the delay in carrying them out. ami an increased ex- 
pense by such delay. Every measure of public im- 
provement which commended itself to his judgment 
lie was favorably to, and wished carried out as soon 
as possible. 

In reference to the several avenues to South Bos- 
ton, he called attention to the manner of their con- 
struction, neither the Dover Street Bridge nor the Sea 
Street Bridge (now Federal street) being built by the 
City, but by the people of South Boston. The city 
did pay $i>6,000, for Mount Washington avenue, but 
was amply repaid for it by the gift of Granite street. 
He believed there should be one wide avenue extend- 
ing from South Boston across the city to the Millriam, 
and the people of South Boston would be willing to 
pay for it in betterments or in any other way in which 
they can be reached by law. The people of south 
Boston would continue to agitate this subject until 
they carried the measure, and there could be no more 
favorable opportunity for carrying out the project 
than the present time" 

Mr. Rice of Ward Nine repeated that, as a matter 
of economy, the avenue should be carried out as once 
contemplated, to Pleasant street and the Common. 
Should the extension be taken up again beyond Al- 
bany street, the expense would be from ten to twen- 
ty-five per cent greater. 

' Mr. Keith of Ward Fifteen said he had not been 
convinced by the argument of the gentlemen from 
Ward Twelve, in favor of the measure. Admit that 
the avenue be extended, as proposed, and it would not 
meet the wants of business travel, which must con- 
tinue ti> be by the shortest route through Federal 
street. Let as many avenues be built as can be, and 
yet that will continue to be the shortest route. Fed- 
eral street bad been widened this year, and as in the 
case of Tremont street, the City Government had 
erred in not making either of them wide enough 

The extended Broadway would be a nuisance to 
all the intermediate territory, not easlv accessible, 
and not suited to heavy travel— a measure which 
must necessitate the raising of all the adjoining streets 
to get upon this street. The expense would be much 
greater than any committee had estimated — even 
that of last year. So far as disadvantages were con- 
cerned, it had been shown in favor of the annexation 
of Roxoury, that South Boston had increased in a 
greater ratio in population. It did not, then, appear 
that the people of South Boston bad suffered much. 
He. could not therefore see any real reason for the 
proposed avenue, and should vote against it. 



The people of South Boston were not subjected to 
greater inconveniences than were the people of Char- 
lestpwn, who had but two bridges to Boston, for then- 
own use aiiri for all of the country back of them. In 
regard to expense, be believed it would be much great- 
er than estimated. 

Mr. Wilson of Ward Twelve argued that the argu- 
ment of the gentleman from Ward Nine proved too 
much. The gentleman from Ward Fifteen was in er- 
ror in regard to the raising of territory, owing to his 
reference to the plan of last year. The new avenue 
would come in at Albany street, at grade, and there 
would be no necessity to raise any intermediate terri- 
tory. Albany street had but a small amount of travel 
now, and was waiting to be entered upon. It was not 
the fact that the greatest amount of travel from South 
Boston would naturally go through Federal street, 
and he assumed that the central point of travel today 
was at the corner of Washington and Boylston street. 

The proposed avenue was what was required, not 
only for ordinary travel, but for convenient ami rap- 
id transit. The expense would be mainly defrayed 
bj- betterments, and the people of South Boston would 
esteem it a privilege to help defray that expense. 

Mr. Denny of Ward Ten did not feel prepared to vote 
for the measure at this time ; and did not desire to act 
upon it now. not having had time to examine the 
plans. He therefore moved the assignment to the 
next meeting of the Council. 

The motion was carried. 

Mr. Bean of Ward Eleven, from the Committee on 
Public Buildings, on the request of the Board of As- 
sessors, made a report that the private offic<- of the 
Board of Overseers for the Poor, when vacant, be as- 
signed to the Assessors. Accepted. 

The same committee, on the petition of Wm. H. 
Adams, lor the sale of a lot of land belonging to the 
city, adjoining the schoolhouse, on Dix place, made a 
report, in fav«r of the sale of said land, under certain 
restrictions, and an order was passed, authorizing 
the committee to sell by public auction the said lot, 
under such terms and restrictions as they may deem 
desirable, and that the proceeds be paid 'into the city 
treasury. 

The same committee, on the subject of an elevator 
in the City Hall, reported that they were unable fully 
t" examine the matter, and recommending its refer- 
ence to the next City Council. The report was accept- 
ed. 

The same committee which bad had under consid- 
eration the subject of purchasing the American Eire 
Extinguisher and the Universal Fire Extinguisher, 
for use in various localities, reported in favor of the 
purchase of several of the latter, to be placed in vari- 
ous parts of tin 1 city. 

Mr. Jacobs of Ward Five offered an order, instruct- 
ing the Committee on Public Buildings to supply each 
Station House in the city with four Universal Fire 
Extinguishers, the expense to be charged to the ap- 
propriation for public buildings. In support of the 
order, be said that Mr. Damrell, Chief Engineer of the 
Fire Department, has expressed ins approval Oi it, 
and that its use would lessen tires one -half. An opin- 
ion has also been expressed that it would lessen insu- 
rance one-third. 

Mr. Jenks of Ward Three moved that the report and 
order be referred to the Committee on the Fire Depart- 
ment. 

Mr. Jacobs said the orders had already been before 
the Committee on the Fire Department, to which Mr. 
Darrow of Ward Eight replied that he was not aware 
of the fact. 

Mr. Train of Ward Three observed that the order 
should be referred to some committee, he cared not 
whether it was that on the Fire Department or the 
Police. If these extinguishers were so valuable, per- 
haps it might be well to have each policeman buckle 
one on bis back on going his rounds. 

The motion to refer to the Committee on the Fire 
Department was carried. 

The same committee, on the order relative to a new 
site for Engine Co. No. 8, reported that they fully con- 
curred with the Committee on the Fire Department 
that the present house was unfit for the use.-, of the 
company, that it could not be repaired to make it suit- 
able, and that the street was too narrow to get the en- 
gine in and out of the house to advantage, they are 
of opinion that the hose bouse on Salem street might 
accommodate this engine, and offered an order that 
the Committee on the Fire Department be authorized 
to transfer the engine to that bouse. 

The Chair expressed the opinion that it was not 
competent for tne committee to authorize the Com- 



80 



PROCEEDINGS OP CITY COUNCIL. 



mittee mi the Fire Department to take any ench action. 

The report was recommitted. 

The same committee reported Inexpedient relative 
to the purchase of a -trip of land adjoining the engine 
house (111 Dorchester street. Accepted. 

On motion of Mi'. Stevens of Want Six it was or 
dered that the A udltor of Accounts be allowed an ap- 
propriation of $300 additional for clerk hire. 

Adjourned to Thursday, 4 P. M. 



Proceedings of Board of Aldermen, 



DEC. 28, 1868. 



The regular weekly meeting of the Board of Alder- 
men was held this afternoon, at 4 o'clock, His Honor 
Mayor Shurtleff presiding. 

APPOINTMENTS CONFIRMED. 

George Coles, special police officer, without pay, at 
the rooms of the Natural History Society; Walter P. 
McConnell and Hiram Nevens, special officers, with- 
out pay, in the Paving Department. 

Cha". H. Blake, as a foreman of Hose Co. Xo. 8; 
Joseph Frye, foreman of Hose Co. Xo. 10; F. M. Fines, 
foreman of Hose Co. Xo-3: John G. Phillips, as a mem- 
ber of the Fire Department, Engine Co. No. 5, and 
Jerome Carlton, a member of Hook and Ladder Co. 
No. 1. 

PETITIONS PRESENTED AND REFERRED. 

Joseph Dowe, respecting the injustice of assessment 
on him for removal of an alleged nuisance in Charles 
street. Referred to the next Board of Alderman. 

Albert s. En ton, for apportionment of assessment 
for betterment on Brimmer street. Referred to the 
Committee on Streets. 

Isaac Packard's heirs, surrendering estate on 
Matthews street. Referred to Committee on Streets. 

NOTICES OF INTENTION TO BUILD. 

Kebber & Delue, Federal street, opposite Beach 
street; Michael Connor, 979 Harrison avenue. Sever- 
ally referred to the Committee on Streets. 

COMMUNICATION FROM THE LAW DEPARTMENT. 

A communication was received from John P. Hea- 
ley, City Solicitor, in accordance with Section 2 of the 
revised ordinance relating to the Law Department of 
the City Government, giving a list of the suits in 
Which the city is a party since the 1st of June last, 
and the action upon them respectively since that time. 
Laid on the table and ordered to be printed. 

REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT OF LAMPS. 

■ A report was received from the Superintendent of 
Lamps, showing the operations of his department 
during the past year. The report states that the de- 
partment is in excellent condition, with a large in- 
crease in the number of lamps during the year. The 
gas lamps have been increased from 3737 to 4414, and 
the fluid lamps from 127!) to 1291. The new system of 
keeping the lights burning all night, regardless of the 
moon's light, has proved to be very satisfactory, with 
an increase of the burning of gas of 30 per cent, over 
that in the city the year previous, and double that of 
the burning in the Highland district. The size of the 
gas-burner has been reduced without detriment, and 
with a saving of $40,000 per annum. The consump- 
tion of flv. id has been decreased with an Increase Of 
lamps. The cost of the gas-lights has been one cent 
an hour for the time in which they were burned. The 
report was ordered to be printed. 

HEARINGS ON ORDERS OF NOTICE. 

A hearing took place on the order of notice relative 
to assessment of betterments for the widening of High 
street. 

Thos, P. Proctor, owner of two estates, Kben B. 
Phillips, owner of two estates, each objected to assess- 
ment of betterments on one of their estates, contend- 
ing that they would be injured rather than benefited 
by the present widening. In answer to Alderman 



Talbot, the last named stated thai land had much ad- 
vanced in valne by the improvement- in the street. 

James Carbrcy for himself, and C. C. Dame for 
Thos. Sprague and Win. a. Prescott, objected to ;i--> — 
incuts on their respective estates. The report was 
recommitted. 

On the hearing on petition Of Ilogan ft Wetherbce 
for leave to put up a steam englno on Chapman and 
Emerald streets, no person appearing, the report was 
recommitted. 

UNFINISHED BUSINESS. 

The order to pay (1000 to the Social Law Library, 
in accordance witii provisions of Chapter 33, General 
Statutes, to be charged to appropriations for County 
Qf Suffolk, was read a second time and passed. 
common COUNCIL PAPERS. 

Petitions and actions on sundry reports took place 
in concurrence, as follows. 

Reference to next City Council on the subject of an 
elevator at the City Hall. 

Report inexpedient to purchase land next to Ward 
Room iii Ward Twelve. 

Recommittal of report in favor of removing Engine 
Company 8 to Hose House No. 1. 

Auditors request for addition of §10.000 to appro- 
priation for Incidentals, etc. Referred to Committee 
on Finance. 

The order announcing a vacancy in the Common 
( ouncil, caused by the resignation of Henry B. 
Phelps, was placed on file. 

The following orders were passed in concurrence : 

Order to allow §300 to Auditor for clerk hire. 

Order to allow Assessors to occupy the small room 
now held by Overseers of Poor," when the latter 
Board leave the City Hall. 

Order to sell at auction the city's land on Dix place. 
near Winthrop sehoolhouse. 

Order to pay R. Emilie Fiske §1000 for injuries re- 
ceived by a fall on icy sidewalk on Broadway. 

REPORTS OF INSPECTORS OF PRISONS. 

The Committee on Institutions of this Board as a 
Board of Inspectors of Prisons for Suflolk county, 
submitted in print a statement of the condition of 
prisons and houses of detention within the county, 
as required by the statutes, as follows: 

The number of inmates of the institutions at Deer 
Island, June >o, 1868, was as follows: 

House of Industry. 

Male Prisoners 135 

Female -23 1 

366 

House of Reformation. 

Bovs 243 

Girls 30 

273 

Paupers— Male (boys 42) 138 

Females 73 

211 

Children of sentenced parents 12 

Total 863 

Another inspection of the institutions at Deer 
Island was made Nov. 27, when the nuuiberof inmates 
was 1084, as follows: 

House of Industry. 

Males 223 

Females 262 

485 

House of Reformation. 

Bovs 265 

Girls 37 

302 

Paupers— Men, 135; Boys, 65 200 

Women, 56; Girls, 26 82 

282 

Children of sentenced parents 15 

1.084 
The Committee examined all parts of the institu- 
tions, the grounds and outbuildings, and found them 
to be in excellent condition. The general health of 
the inmates was good ; and the boys especially, who 
work upon the farm for six months in the year ap- 
peared robust and healthy. The new addition to the 
reform school for girls is a great improvement, en- 
abling the Directors to accommodate double the num- 
ber of inmates that thev have heretofore, there is a 



PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



81 



lack of proper accommodation for the pauper girls, 
but a brick building is soon to lie erected for their 

use. 

It appeared to the Committee, that the new Super- 
intendent, .Mr. Guy C. Underwood' performed the 
difficult duties of his position in a highly satisfactory 
manner. 

House of Correction. 

The committeee visited the House of Correction nt 
South Boston, Aug, .">. when the number of inmates 
was as follows : 

Male-. 283; females, 128— total, 411. 

Another inspection, Dec. i), showed the number to 
hi' 453, as follows: Males, 316; females, 137. 

The new workshop was nearly completed. It is a 
substantial and well-arranged building; and its erec- 
tion reflects great credit on the Board Of Directors, 
and <m Captain Charles Robbins, the Superintendent 
of the institution. 

By improvements in the method of working, the in- 
troduction of sewing machines, ;in<l the advanced pri- 
ces forcontract work, this institution will soon uecome 
self-sustaining. 

Suffolk County Jail. 

On the Ttli November the ( lommittee visited the Suf- 
folk County Jail, and made a careful examination of 
the building, the general condition of which they 
found to be good. The number of prisoners held at 
that time was '207. 

Lunatic Hospital. 

A visit to the Lunatic Hospital, Aug. 5, showed the 
number of inmates to be 185, as follows : 

Males, 100; females, 85— total, 185. 

( >n the 9th of December the number was as follows : 

M iles, 98; females, 88— total, 174. 

The present able Siiperint indent and his valuable 
assist i nt do all that t lie limited accommodations of the 
building will allow to promote the comfori and cheer- 
fulness of the inmates. The present building is dis- 
creditable to the city; and a new one should lie 
erected on ample grounds, in another locality, with 
as little delay as possible. 

The Committee conclude, as follows : 

In October last the Committ se, occ imp inied by the 
Superintendent of the Deer Island Institutions, visited 
the reformatory institutions on Blaekwell's Island 
and Randall's Island, connected with the City of New 
York, for the purpose of ascertaining whetherany new 
methods were in operation in those establishments 
which mi ;hi be introduced with advantage into our 
institutions. From the examinations which they 
made they were satisfied that, so far as the general 
character and administration of our ins til ii I ions were 
concerned, they were decidedly superior to those of 
New York. 

In concluding this brief record of their inspections. 
the Committee would respectfully recommend that 
there should be a complete separation oJ the adult 
paupers at Deer Island from the criminal and refor- 
matory institutions. Provision has already been 
made to accommodate the minors of this class in sep- 
arate buildings. By the enlargement of the boundary 
of the city, the increase of population will, of course, 
increase tin number of commitments to the reforma- 
tory institutions, and the entire building will soon be 
required for the accommodation of i hose sent from the 
courts. The Committee would, therefore, urge the 
attention of the City Government to the importance 
of taking early action upon the subject of providing 
separate accommodations for the adult paupers. 
Respectfully submitted; 

g. w. messinger, 
Framis Richards, 
Samuel C. Conn, 

Committee. 

INSPECTORS OF ELECTION'S IN WARD ONE. 
The committee appoint >d to reexamine the ballots 
cast for Inspectors of Elections in Ward One, as re- 
quested by the p itition of ii. McDevitt and others, re- 
ported as follows : Job II. Perkins has 10S0; Charles 
P. Pearson, lilt!); James Woolley, 104:2; Joseph P. 
Myers, 9G5; Thomas J. Lane, 1)04; and uiev appear 
to he elected. George A. Butler h»s 844; John II. Du- 
nne, 777: John T. Weston, 750: Michael McDi nough, 
71!); Bernard O'Donnell, 739; and George 11. Butler 
188. Although, as represented by residents of Ward 
One, the 188 ballots cast for George II. Butler were 
probably intended for George A. Butler (it being a 
mistake in printing Hie ticket on which the name oc- 
curs) yet the committee feel that they have no author- 



ity for declaring any other facts than those the ballots 
exhibit. The committee, therefore, direct that the 
usual certificates of election be issued to the first five 
named gentlemen. The report was accepted. 
REPORTS OF COMMITTEES. 
Alderman White, from the Committee on Licenses, 
rcportedin favor of licenses to sundry persons as 
victuallers, innholders, intelligence offices, hacks and 
hack stands. Severally accepted. 

Also the renewal of licenses of various persons as 
auctioneers. Accepted. 

Also, on petition of Charles Lewis, for leave to give 
a sparring exhibition. Accepted. 

Alderman Paul, from the Committee on Sewers, re- 
ported leave to withdraw on the petition of Benjamin 
T. Gould, for an abatement of tax for a sewer in 
Wall street. Accepted. 

Alderman Paul also reported the assessments for 
sewer in Deacon street, revised, and assessments for 
sewers in Wareham street, amounting to $1868 11 ; in 
London street, amounting to $906 39; in Purchase 
street, amounting to $530 75; and in Broadway, 
amounting to $494 43. Severally accepted. 

Alderman Braman, from the Committee <>n Boston 
Harbor, on the petition of Charles Stoddard and 
others that the deposits from the sewers which are 
discharged into Charles river, may he removed by 
dredging, made a report statingthat the request ofthe 
petitioners had been complied with, and they further 
say that the removal of such deposits by dredging is 
only temporary, however, and the committee are of 
opinion thai no permanent and effective remedy of 
this nuisance ear, 1m- secured except by the construc- 
tion of a sea wall, as provided by act 'of the Legisla- 
ture. They therefore recommend that the early atten- 
tion of the next City Council be given to 1 1 1 i -s subject. 
The report was accepted. 

Alderman Braman, from the Committee on Lamps, 
reported in favor ofthe petition of James P. Case and 
others for a lamp in Bumstead Court; also, on peti- 
tion of Aimer W. Pollard, that Glenwood avenue be 
lighted with gas. Severally accepted. 

The same Committee reported that no action was 
necessary on petition of John Bleiler and others, that 
gas lamps be placed in Heath place, and leave to 
withdraw, on petition of Charles Bunker and others 
for a gas lam p at the northeast comer of Centre ami 
Cedar streets. Severally accepted. 

Alderman James, from the Committee on Paving, 
reported an additional location on the petition of the 
Metropolitan Railroad Company, to lav down a track 
from the foot Of Cornhill to a point opposite the head 
of North street, there to connect with the track now 
laid down on the west side of Union street, subject 
to the usual conditions in laving down such tracks 
Accepted. 

Alderman Talbot, from the Committee on Streets, 
reported no action necessary on sundry notices of in'. 
tention to build. Accepted. 

The same Committee reported several orders for 
the payment for land taken to widen streets, which 
were read twice and passed. 

Alderman Paul from the Committee on Sewers, to 
whom was referred the communication of the Select- 
men of West Roxbury in reference to joint action with 
the City in improving the channel of Stony Brook 
Deported — 

That the greater part of the season since the com. 
munioations was referred to them has been occupied 
in preparing the plans for the projected alterations, 
and as there is abundant opportunity for the consid- 
eration ofthe subject before the work can be commen- 
ced, they recommend that the subject be referred to 
the next Board of Aldermen. 

The report was accepted. 

ORDERS P VSSED. 

Order that the Treasurer deduct from the tax assess- 
ed on the estate of Win. R. Frost, No. :i Staniford 
street, (he sum of $24 60. 

Order to pay hills of certain persons directly or in- 
directly connected willi the City Government. 

Order for the collection of assessments for sidewalk 
in Cottage street, amounting to ^Hv2;, 4_\ 

Order for the collection of assessments in the 
abatement of nuisances. 

Order to allow hills of Sheriff of Suffolk count v, for 
supplies, amounting to $3638 36. 

Order approving of the rooms occupied by Co. K 
1st regiment, in Wain's Hall, at a rent of $250 per an-' 
num. 

Order to pay Willard Phillips *447h for land taken 
and damages occasioned by the widening of High 



32 



TTROCKTCDINas OF CITY COUNCIL. 



of $ 



CJ.:>. 



Order to pay George W. Hunnewell $600, in full 
compensation for all damages done to his estate, No. 
504 Shawmut avenue, by the raising of the grade of 

said avenue. 

tit VNSFEK OF APPROPRIATION. 

Alderman Messinger, from the Committee on Insti- 
tutions, reported an order, which was passed, for the 
transfer of $15,000 from the appropriation lor lamps to 
the appropriation for a new work-shop at the House 

of ( 'orrection. 

Adjourned to Thursday, 12 M. 



street. 

< >rder to pay Stephen Dow $5380 for land taken and 
damages occasioned by the widening of High street. 

Order d) pay Moses I'.. Scwall $5390 for land taken 
and damages occasioned by the widening of High 

street. 

Order to pay S. C. Wheelwright, wife of J. W. 
Wheelwright, *i~-i* for land taken and damages oc- 
casioned by i he widening of High street. 

I trder authorizing the Committee on Public Lands 
to purchase of the heirs of Wm. Richardson a snip of 
land on Harrison avenue containing [366 2-10 feet, at 
$2 per foot, amounting to $2732 40, to be charged to 
Public Lands. 

Order that the street, forty feel in width, running 
from Harrison avenue to Albany street . as laid out by 
the Committee on Public lands, be approved by this 
Board. 

Order thai the amount of $3000, authorized to be ex- 
pended for the supply of soup to persons known to be 
in necessitous circumstances, be charged to the appro- 
priation for police, instead of being equally divided 
between the appropriations for Police and" Health. 
Order authorizing the Committee on Public Build- 
ings to make slight alterations and supply some 
articles of furniture for the Wells Schoolhouse, at an 
expense not exceeding $650, to he Charged to the ap- 
propriation for Grammar Schools. Public Buildings. 
Order directing the Chief of Police to notify tin; 
owner of estate No. 50 Beach street to close up and 
make solid within ten days the openings made bv him 
in the sidewalk in front of his estate No. 50 Beach 
street, and in default thereof the Superintendent of 
Streets is hereby directed to (dose up and make solid 
said openings at the expense of the owner thereof. 
( inlcr that the Superintendent of Health be author- 
ized to till up Rnggles place with ashes, wherever the 
fences have been raised, and charge the value of the 
same to the appropriation for stony Brook sewer. 

Order that the Hoard establish the revised grade of 
Spring lane, as shown on a plan and profile made by 
the City Surveyor, dateil Sept- "21, 1868, approved by 
the Committee on Paving, and deposited in the office 
of said City surveyor. 

Order that the Superintendent of Lamps, under the 
direction of the committee on that department,be and 
iie is hereby authorized to contract for one hundred 
iron posts, the cost of the same to be charged to the 
appropriation for the lamp department. 

Order that the Superintendent of Lamps, under the 
direction of the committee on that department, be and 
he is hereby authorized to purchase live thousand reg- 
ulator gas burners, at a cost to the city not to exceed 
$3500, the expense to be charged to the appropriation 
for lamps. 

Order that the assessment of taxes on the estate 
purchased by the city of Haynes II. Wright, No. 462 
Federal street, amounting to $313 G5, be paid into the 
City Treasury by the said city, to be charged to the 
Federal . trce't loan ; also an estate purchased by the 
city, amounting to $688 30, to be charged to appropri- 
ation for widening Tremont street. 

Order that the Committee on Public Buildings be 
authorized to build outside porches to the floors of 
Faneuil Hall Market House, at an expense not exceed- 
ing $600, to be charged to the Appropriation for Pub- 
lic Buildings. 

Order that the collection of the assessments levied 
upon Alvin M. Bobbins for the sewer in shawmut av- 
enue ne and is hereby postponed until entry is made 
into said sewer. 

order that the Superintendent of street- be author- 
ized to purchase two team horses for the use of the 
paving department in Koxbury, and to dispose of two 
horses unlit for service in said department, at a cost 



Proceedings of Board of Aldermen, 



DEC. 31, 1868. 



An adjourned meeting of the Hoard of Aldermen 
was held at noon today, in- Honor Mayor Bhuitleff 
presiding. 

APPOINTMENT CONFIRMED. 

Henry T. Bowers, as a member of Hose Companv 
No. 10. • 

COMMISSIONERS ON ANNEXATION OF DORCHESTER. 

Clins. K. Train, Nathaniel J. iJradlcc George A. 
Shaw. 

PETITIONS PRESENTED AND REFERRED. 

German Catholic, Church, Suffolk Btreet, to be 
compensated for damages caused to their property 
by impaired drainage. Referred to the Committee oil 
Claims. 

German Catholic Church, that the Board would 
decide definitely upon the proposed widening or 
Suffolk street. Referred to the Committee on streets. 

METROPOLITAN RAILROAD LOCATION. 

A communication was received from the Metropol- 
itan Railroad Co., accepting the nineteenth location 
granted to them, for the laying of tracks in Washing- 
ton street and Dock square. Bead and placed on 
tile. 

HEARING ON ORDER OK NOTICE. 



The hearing on petition of Albany Street Freight 
Railroad Co. for an extension of their location in 
Albany street was taken up, by assignment. No 
person appearing in opposition, the report was re- 



Albanj 
person 

committed. 

TREMONT STREET WIDENING. 

The Committee on Paving, on the order relative to 
removing the sidewalks on Tremont street, adjacent to 
the Common, and of locating in its place a Hag-stone 
walk, reported inexpedient to take such action, and 
they further say, they are of the opinion that the 
public convenience requires that Tremont street shall 
be widened between West and Boyle ton streets, by 
setting back the Common fence, and in order that 
the subject may receive due consideration bv the 
appropriate committee, they recommend its reference 
to the Committee on laying out and widening streets. 
Accepted. 

REPORTS OF COMMITTEES. 

Alderman Braman, from the joint standing Com- 
mittee on Bathing, submitted a report in print ot what 
had been accomplished by their Department during 
the past year. The Committee say that the example 
of Boston in regard to bathing houses is being followed 
elsewhere— Charlestown ami Cambridge, .Mass., Pitts- 
burg, Penn., Cincinnati, O., St. Louis, Mo. They also 
refer to the establishment of drinking fountains, 
which they regard as one of the results of success 
in their own department. The appropriation tor the 
financial year 1868— 69, amounted to $25,000. During 
the year 1868, the total number of baths given was 
.s4'J,(il7; in lsiiT, 807,201 ; in lSliti, 433,690. The Commit- 
tee say that to the able and efficient committee of the 
last two years, and more especially to Ex-Alderman 
Slack, tiie Chairman, the beneficial results which 
have attended the establishment of the bathing bouses 
are mainly due. 

Alderman White, from the Committee on Licenses, 
reported favorably on petitions for licenses as inn- 
holders, hack stands, and transfer of license. Ac- 
cepted. 

Alderman .Tames, from the Committee on Public 
Lands, reported leave to withdraw on petition of 
E. A. Parkman and of Geo. Packer and others. Ac- 
cepted. 

Alderman Fairbanks, from the Committee on Steam 
Engines, reported in favor of granting the petition of 
Ilogan & Wethcrbec, for leave to "set up a steam 
engine. 

Alderman Richards, from the Committee on the 
Fire Department, recommended reference to Board 
of Engineers of the Fire Department on petition of 
John Haskins and others against the erection of 
wooden buildings on Ottawa street: reference to 
next Hoard of Alderman on petition of Hook & Ladder 
Co. No. 4; and leave to withdraw on petition of 
Manson \ Peterson, for leave to erect certain build- 



UHOCEEDINOS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



ings oa Border street, East Boston. Several]}- ac- 
cepted. 

Alderman Talbot, from the Committee on Streets, 
reported inexpedient to take further action on order 
of notice fur the extension of Allen street; also on 
widening of Telegraph street ; also on widening Sum- 
ner street; also on widening Suffolk street, Shawinut 
avenue; assessing damages to estates on Hamilton 
street; extending Ottawa street ; assessments of bet- 
terments iu Congress street; widening of Mount Ver- 
non street; on grading of Washington square; on 
petition of Free Church of St. Mary for abatement of 
assessment for betterment in widening of Richmond 
street; no further action necessary on extension of F 
street to the Highland District ; leave to withdraw on 
petition for extension of Colony street to Sixth street. 
Severally accepted. 

Alderman James, from the Committee on Paving, 
reported leave to withdraw severally on the petitions 
of Ann 1'. Buttrick, for grade damages, of F. ('. .v. C. 
P. Newcomb and others, John Dove and others. 1). 
W. Salisbury and others, Timothy Ilannon; and no 
action necessary on petitions of Edwin Pope and 
others, Thomas Waterman and others, E. \V. Pike. 
and others, Broadway Railroad Co., M. L. Walker 
and others, Samuel A. Way for edgestone in Genesee 
street ; Geo. T. Bigelow and others, for the paving of 
Court square with the Nicholson pavement, and of 
laborers in paving department for increase of wages ; 
also on petition of Nathan Wheeler and others, Jo- 
seph Sherer, on Marginal Freight Railroad Company 
on intention to build its tracks; Boston & Albany 
Railroad Co., relative to wall on Indiana place, Mid- 
dlesex Railroad Co., on change of use of cars on 
North street and Dock square; Ivory Bean and others, 
J. W. I'.rocklehank, to introduce wood paving: W. 
Eaton and others, G. F. Cobb and Others, and re- 
solve on horse car distances and speed. Reference 
to next Hoard of Aldermen on petition of Mary A. 
Wellbrook. Severally accepted. 

Alderman Paul, from the Committee on Sewers, 
reported an order lor the collection of assessments 
for sewers on Lambert avenue, amounting to $15,603 80. 

The Committee on Claims reported leave to with- 
draw on petition of Jairus Pratt. Accepted. 

Alderman Talbot, from the Committee on street-, 
reported in favor of the division of betterments into 
three parts, assessed on estates of Jonathan Jones 
andc. J. Bishop for the widening of Bowker street; 
also for a like division of betterments on various es- 
tates for the extension of Brimmer street. Accept- 
ed. 

SOUTH END DRAINAGE. 

Alderman Paul, from the Committee on Sewers, 
made a report in reference to the drainage at South 
End, which was ordered to be printed. The report 
states that from the Albany Railroad to Roxburj line 
and between Washington street anil the land lately 
tilled by the Boston Water Power Company, lies a 
district densely populated, comprising about half of 
Wards Ten and Eleven. This area contains one 
hundred and sixty acres. The city, as owner of the 
land at the South End, when preparing them for 
sale, built the necessary sewers through the streets, 
at a very low level, in order to drain the natural sur- 
face of the vacant lots, inclosed as they were by em- 
banked streets, and to keep the sewers below the 
ground at the points of discharge on the shore of the 
bay, which at this time was the westerly line of Tre- 
mont street. 

The Committe refer to the sewers that have been 
built on the. territory, and enumerate certain meas- 
ures which, if carried out, would mitigate the pres- 
ent evil and be of permanent benefit. 

First. The part of the territory between Dover 
street and the Albany Railroad should be raised to a 
sufficiently high level to drain independently to South 
Bay by a separate system of sewers, and leave to the 
rested' the territory the full use of the large sewers in 
Treniont and Dover streets. 

Second. A small portion of the water from the 
streets might be intercepted by extending the system 
of surface drainage, and every encouragement should 
be offered to owners of houses to remove the con- 
ductors which now enter the main sewers, and have 
them discharge either into the gutters or into the sur- 
face drains. 

Third. Another sewer could be opened to South 
Bay through Concord street, giving better storage 
room at a low level for the dry weather drainage — 
for which now the sewers of Dover and Dedlium 
streets are bandy sullicient— and affording a quicker 
outlet in storms as soon as the tide hail receded low 



enough. The city has already obtained an act of the 
Legislature to raise the territory north of Dover 
street, and when this is undertaken, all the streets 
possible should be graded as high as twenty feet 
above low water. 

The cost of the sewers proposed would be about 
$30,000. 

In looking at the whole subject, the Committee 
feel that the best interests of the 'property would be 
promoted, if the low houses could he raised to a prop- 
er height, or all the sub-cellars abandoned, so as to 
leave no house liable to be flooded, but that this 
should be done, if ever done, by the owners, either 
individually or by combining together those in the 
same block. The city has given the grades of the 
streets to the builders, and these grades would allow 
a dry cellar of ordinary height under the level of the 
street, but the city has no control over the depth to 
which a cellar may be dug, and if made too deep, the 
Committee do not' think there is any legal or moral 
responsibility upon the city to compensate the own- 
ers. 

The Committee do not regard the pumping scheme 
with much favor for these reasons : As in all pump- 
ing works the power should be somewhat in excess 
of its maximum duty in order to be provided against 
accidents, and the management of the whole machin- 
ery so as to have it in readiness to exert its greatest 
effort, at very short notice, after comparatively long 
idleness, would require the most extreme ('are and 
ability. 

It is also a consideration, whether the knowledge 
that so manv houses were ten an table only on condi- 
tion that this machinery should always be in readi- 
ness, and always do its work, would not lower to a 
certain extent the value of all the hroperty in the dis- 
trict, and so practically increase the "cost of the 
scheme. 

The introduction of such an element into our sew- 
erage would be a pernicious example for other por- 
tions of the C'ty at low grade, and would preclude all 
hope of ever having them raised to a healthv level. 
The cost of the storage plan renders any further con- 
sideration of it unnecessary 

The committee are not disposed to favor the ex- 
penditure of any large sum to place this territory high 
enough to insure its complete drainage, while they 
think the city should do what can be reasonably done 
to improve the present state of things. They refrain, 
however, just at the (lose of their official existence, 
from offering any orders for the expenditure of 
money, since the new Board will have ample time 
before any work can be done to mature their plan 
and pass the necessary orders ; but the policy of the 
city toward this territory should be at once defined 
and adhered to, and ttie property owners be encour- 
aged to go on and perform what may remain neces- 
sary for the improvement of their houses. 

THE FEKKY QUESTION. 

Alderman Seaver, from the Committee on Ferries, 
reported an order requiring the ferry company to 
run two boats on each terry, and that o'n the new' ter- 
ry two boats should be run from A. M. to 7 P. 31., 
and one boat until 10 P. M. 

Alderman Talbot moved that the subject be referr- 
ed to the next Board. A discussion ensued, in which 
Alderman Talbot, Pratt and Seaver participated. 

The subject was finally laid on the table, on motion 
of Alderman Seaver. 

OUDEUS PASSED. 

Order to pay Beals, Greene & Co. $52,000 for land 
taken and damages occasioned by the widening of 
Devonshire street. 

Order to pay Elizabeth A. Cusbing $8000 for land 
taken and damages occasioned by the opening of 
Avon place as a public street. 

Order for the collection of assessments for the re- 
moval of nuisances in Dunlow street, amounting to 
$1147 -23. 

Order for the assessment Of betterments to the 
amount of $12,445 30 for the widening of Matthews 
street. 

Order for the modification of conditions for sale of 
land on Tremont and Union Park streets 

Order authorizing the transfer of $12,000 from the 
Reserved Fund to appropriation for incidental ex- 
penses. 

Order that all matters of an unfinished nature iu 
tin- hands of several joint standing committees be 
referred to tne next City council. 



84r 



PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



order t<> pay John <;. Blair and John Proctor 
$1000 for removing the buildings in the widening of 
Tivnioni street 

Order to pay Charles K. Hamilton ami others 
$34,785 for land taken to widen Union street under 
resolve of July 24, 1802. 

Order to pay Henry W. Paine ami other- $300 as 
referees in the case" of Charles K. Hamilton ami 

others. 

Order assessing betterments to the amount of 
$37,649 85 upon estates, for the widening of High 
street, between Congress ami Summer streets, and 
to the amount of $85,119 80 on estates for the widen- 
ing of High street, between Congress and Federal 
streets. 

Adjourned. 



Proceedings of the Common Council, 



DEC. 31, 1868. 



The regular weekly meeting of the Common Council 
was held at 4 o'clock this afternoon, Charles H.Allen, 
the President, in the chair. 

PAPERS FROM THE HOARD OF ALDERMEN". 

The several petitions from the Board of Aldermen 
were referred in concurrence. 

The following reports were concurrently acted tip- 
on : 

Report on the petition of Chas. Stoddard etals., con- 
cerning deposits from sewers, at the corner of Bea- 
con and Charles streets; that the request of the peti- 
tioners has been complied with, but a permanent 
remedy can only be secured by a sea-wall, and the at- 
tention of the next City Council is recommended to 
the subject. 

Reports leave to withdraw on petitions of E. A. 
Parkinan and Geo. Packer and others. 

Report leave to withdraw on petition of Jairus 
Pratt. 

The appointment of commissioners on the annexa- 
tion of Dorchester was ordered to be placed on file. 

The order authorizing alterations in, and a supply 
of some articles of furniture for, the Wells .School- 
house, at an expense not exceeding $650, being under 
consideration, 

Mr. Jenks of Ward Three inquired if the articles re- 
ferred to, were in any way connected with the con- 
tracts for the schoolhbuse. 

It was stated in reply that they were not. 

Mr. Tr.iin of Ward Three wished to know what the 
articles were. 

Mr. P.ean of War 1 Eleven, of the Committee, said 
that he did not know what they were. 

Mr. Darrow Of Ward Ten said that as no one seem- 
ed to know, he would move its reference to the next 
City Government. Carried. 

At a subsequent stage of the proceedings, a recon- 
sideration was carried, relative to the above, and the 
oiiler was passed in concurrence. 

The following orders were also passed in concur- 
rence : 

Order, bills to pay January draft. 

Order authorizing building of porches at the doors 
of Faneuil Hall Market House, at an expense not ex- 
ceeding $600. 

Order authorizing purchase from Win. Richardson's 
heirs Of 1366 2-10 feet of land on Harrison avenue, at 
not exceeding $2732 40. 

Order authorizing a transfer from the appropriation 
for lamps of $15,000, to be added to the appropriation 
for the new workshop at the House of Correction. 

Order authorizing a transfer of $12,000 from the 
Reserved Fund to the appropriation for Incidental 
Expenses. 

Order that all matters of an unfinished nature in the 
hands of the several joint standing committees be re- 
ferred to the next Cil\ Council. 
PETITIONS. 

Mr. Wright of Ward Twelve presented tha petitions 
Of Henry Souther and 214 others, Thos. Manning and 



276 others, Howard A. Doe and 202 others, lb. ratio 
Harris and ::» others, Irrederick Kickerson and 219 
others, Harrison Loring and 68 others, severally in 
favor of the extension of Broadway. 

Mr. Minon of Ward Seven presented the petition of 
James Collins and 150 others in favor of the same ob- 
ject. 

REPORTS 'if COMMITTEES. 

Mr. Darrow of Ward Ten, from the Committee on 

the Fire Department the order lor the purchase 

of four Universal fc'ire Extinguishers to be placed 
in each station House, reported reference to the next 
City < louucil. Accepted. 

REDUCTION' OK Tilt: CITY DEBT. 

.Mr. Train, from the Committee on Finance, submit- 
ted a report on the Reduction of the ( :itv Debt for the 
year 1868, made up from the books of the Treasurer 
and Auditor of Accounts at the close of business De- 
cember 31, 1868: 

At the commencement of the present fi- 
nancial year, May l, 1868, we find that 
the consolidated funded debt on that 
date as will be seen by the Auditor of 
Accounts 9 printed report, City Docu- 
ment 56, page 179, was i $14,011,656 91 

Since that time loans have been negotia- 
ted on various orders of the City Coun- 
cil to the amount of -2,7:38,000 00 

Making a total funded debt of $16,749,656 HI 

Deducting from this amount all the debt 
which has become due ami been paid 
this financial year 232,81 17 00 

We have left a funded debt, December 
31, 1868 $16,516,849 91 

To which add for loans authorized but 
not paid l,67i'.O00 00 

To which is to be added the amount ad- 
vanced on account of Oliver street 
loans 232,652 t4 

Making a total funded and unfunded 

debt, December 31, 1868, of $18,428,502 7."> 

This debt the Auditor of Accounts classifies as fol- 
lows : 

Water Debt (net cost of works) $8,917,702 55 

City of Boston, Debt Proper 6,679,801 20 

City of Boston, War Debt 1,915,500 00 

Roxbury Debt 91 5,4!!9 00 

Total Debt, Dec. 31, 1868 $18,428,502 75 

Total Debt, Dec. 31, 18(57 13,645,336 24 

Increase of Debt in 1868 $4,783,166 51 

Which inerea.se is accounted for a- follows : 

Water Debt, Dec. 31, 1868. .. .$8,917,802 55 

Water Debt, Dec. 31,1867.... 7,611,70!) 14 

increase of Water Debt in ]s(;s $1,305,993 41 

Citv of Boston, Debt Proper, 

l')ec. 31, 1868 $6,670,801 20 

Ditto, Dee. 31,1867 4,128.127 10 

Increase of Citv of Boston, Debt Proper, 
in 1868 ' $2,551,674 10 

War Debt. Dec. 31, 1868 $1,915,500 

War Debt, Dec. 31, 1867 1,905,500 

Increase of War Debt iii IS68 $10,003 03 

(This apparent increase of WarLoansis 
in consequence of error of statement in 
last year's report of amount of loans 
redeemed in 1867, the amount redeem- 
ed being $91,000 instead of $101,000 as 
stated. There has been no real in- 
crease on this account.) 

Add Roxbury Debt assumed by the Act 
of Annexation, which was not enumer- 
ated in the annual report of I he Com- 
mittee on the Reduction of the City 
Debt of last year, viz. (less $75,957 paid 
since annexation) 91.">,409 00 

Net increase of the Debt as above Stated $4,783,166 51 

Means of Paying Off the Debt. 

The books of the Treasurer and Auditor of Accounts 
show that the means for paying the debt of the city 
consist of the follow ins items, ail of which are by or- 
dinance specially appropriated for that object, "viz. : 
Cash balance in the City Treasury, May 

l, 1868, to the credit of the Committee 

on the Reduction of the City Debt, and 

six percent, currency bonds of the < lity 



PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



85 



of Boston held by the Treasurer, be- 
longing to said Committee as stated in 
the Auditor of Accounts' printed re- 
port, City Doe,. 56, page 180 $4,762,299 59 

Cash received since that dale, being pay- 
ments made into the city Treasury on 
bonds and mortgages on public lands. 140.470 10 

Cash received from sales and rents of 
public lands not included in the above 
item 10,!)ii:; 73 

Cash received from the annual city tax 
for 1868, being the amount appropria- 
ted by the City Council lor this object, 
as required by ordinance on finance... 417.000 00 

$5,330,739 42 
Deduct payments on Debt since May 1, 

1868. '• • • • 232,807 oil 



$5,097,932 42 

Add bonds and mortgages on Public 
Lands now i:i the ( ity Treasury, all of 
which are considered good 520,377 •>•'! 

Total means on hand for the redemption 
Of the Debt, Dec. 31, 1868 $5,618,309 75 

The Debt and Means <\i' Paying !/ Off. 

The consolidated debt ofthe city, funded 
and unfunded, Dec. 31, 18(58, amounted 
to $18,428,502 ::« 

Less the means on hand for paying the 
same Dec. 31, 1868 '.. 5,618,30975 

Net debt Dec. Ill, 1868 612,810,19;! 00 

The consolidated debt of the city, funded 
and unfunded, Dec. 31, 1867, amounted 
lo $13,645,336 24 

Less the means on hand for paying the 
same Dec. 31,1867 4,699,28073 

Net debt D3C31, 1867 $8,946,05551 

Net increase of the debt during 1863 $3,864,137 40 

The report shows that the gross debt during the year 
ISlis increased $4,783,166 51, that lie- means for the re- 
demption of the debt increased $919,928 02, and that 
the net increase ofthe debt was $3,864,137 -in. The re- 
port was laid on the table ami ordered to be printed. 

ORDERS ADOPTED. 

On motion of Mr. Denny of Ward Ten that the City 
Messenger be requested to procure the suitable bind- 
ing of the City Documents for the year 1868, one for 
each member ofthe council. 

Mr. Train of Ward Three offered an order for an in- 
quiry by the Committee on Internal Health whether 
beef of diseased cattle has been brought into this city 
for side, and what further legislation is necessary to 
prevent such practices. On his motion, the subject 
was referred to the next City Council. 

Mr. Minon of Ward Seven offered an ordi r that the 
speaking trumpet now used by Mr. Damrell, Chief 
Engineer ot the Fire Department, which was present- 
ed to the Eagle Fire Company in 1856, and is now the 
property ofthe city, lie presented to Mr. Damrell as a 
token of the regard entertained towards him for the 
manner in which he has discharged hisduties the pres- 
ent year. 

Mr. Wads worth of Ward Four thought that if the 
property belonged to the city it would be well to make 
such a provision in regard to it that future Chief En- 
gineers might have the use of it. 

In answer to an inquiry, Mr. Minon stated that the 
trumpet was of silver, gold lined, and was picked out 
ofthe rubbish in the City Hall by Capt. Damrell, who 
had had it put in order for use. 

After further remarks by Messrs Pickering of Ward 
Fourteen and Dar row of Ward Eight, who said al- 
though he was once a strong opponent of Captain 
Damrell, he favored this order, it was adopted. 

EXTENSION OF BROADWAY. 

The resolve and order for the extension of Broad- 
way, assigned to this evening, were taken up. 

Mr. Wright of Ward Twelve referred to the obser- 
vations made by him at the last meeting of the Coun- 
cil in favor of the passage of this measure. lie did 
not propose to say much of anything further, and did 
not think it necessary to add to the able report of the 
committee on the subject. It was only desirable to 
refer to some paints in that report. One of these vo- 
lated to the desirable lots for residences, unsold, at 
South Boston, ami held at low figures, much lower 
than elsewhere, at the same distance from the centre 



ofthe city. 

This was a question of dollars and cents, which 
every member of the City Government ought to be 
able without difficulty lo answer. Lei them consider 
themselves in the position of the petitioners whose 
petitions were presented to the Council today, or put 
themselves in the place of men living for thirty years 
in South Boston who had suffered for want ot a suita- 
ble avenue to the city, and they would not hesitate 
long in determining properly the settlement of this 
question. The committee also speak ofthe the prop- 
erly subject to the betterment law; and the fad that the 
betterments can be assessed on the whole of that long 
a\enue, bringing back most ofthe expense, oughl lo 
have great weight. The Hoard of Aldermen, which 
has the power of laying out streets, has voted unani- 
mously in favorof this measure, and that should have 
some weight in favor of its passage. 

If it be found necessary or advantageous to extend 
Broadway beyond Albany street, it will undoubtedly 
be extended. As a measure of justice to the people 
of South Boston, it was due to them that it should be 
passed, and he hoped that in the closing hours of this 
Council they would have the kind regards ofthe City 
Government in the passage of this measure, which 
will be followed by their prayers and blessings. 

Mr. Train of Ward Three, referring to this as his 
last day of service in the Council, said he might give 
his silent vote on this subject, but as such would be 
a cowardly act he felt it to be due to himself and to the 
people that he should say something. On this subject, 
and that of the widening of Hanover street, he had 
given more attention than to any other matters under 
consideration, during the past year, and had endeav- 
oied to do so in a spirit of comprehension of what the 
wants of the city required. He had not been a resi- 
dent Of thiscity but three years, yet had done busi- 
ness here for thirteen years, he had made it his home 
and intended to remain here so long as Providence 
permitted him to live, and he wished in every way to 
promote its prosperity. 

He could not torget, either, that this City constitu- 
tion one-third of this grand old Commonwealth, out 
of which had proceeded the principles which had in- 
fluenced to a great extent this country. As an impor- 
tant city on this continent, it would be made in accor- 
dance with the legislation given to it by the City Gov- 
ernment. II should be borne in mind' (hat this City 
must at no distant day contain a population of a mil- 
lion of inhabitants, and many now living would see 
the time when the population would not be much 
short of that number. 

In legislating for a city of such importance and size, 
it should be in no stinted manner, and he should vote 
not only for the Broadway extension, but the Han- 
over street widening. It was possible that a better 
avenue to South Boston could be found, but being no 
engineer, he was forced to take for his guidance the 
action of those to whom the city trusted its interests 
in that respect. It was plain that South Boston want- 
ed a new avenue, and the Board Of Aldermen bad de- 
signated the place, which he was ready to believe was 
the most suitable one to meet the necessities ofthe 
people of that section ofthe city. 

Looking beyond the present number of inhabitants, 
who came from south Boston every dav, he could see 
the day when the people as far as the fceponset river 
would he one with the city, and require further 
means of access to it. South' Boston had a right to de- 
mand this avenue, and while they were here in large 
numbers in favor of it. he had yet to hear of any one 
in South Boston opposed to it. It is fair to assume 
that it has no enemies outside of the City Council. 
He believed it would be economy for the city today 
to open three or four more lateral avenues for facili- 
tating travel across the city. 

To go from the western part ofthe City to the water, 

there is no direct communication. He ilid oot doubt 
that the statement of the gentleman from South Bos- 
ton (Mr. Wilson) was true, that the central point of 

travel vv as al tin 1 corner of Washington and liovlsion 
streets. 
The extension of Broadway should, as one of these 

lateral thoroughfares, be constructed ami continued 
to Pleasant street, ami then it would be one of the 
grandest avenues in the city. Some gentlemen had 
said that they would go for 'more extended avenues, 
bin e. hi Id not go for half-way measures. lie believed 
such lo be unwise reasoning. 

Mi-. Train said he was satisfied that if Broadway 
extension were carried out as now proposed, it would 
not be eighteen months before the avenue would be 
extended as tar as any could wish. One thing wa» 



36 



PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



certain, thai unless the work was commenced, it could 
never be finished. 

The gentleman from Ward Fifteen made n very in- 
teresting argument, to which he listened with great 
pleasure. It was nol exactly true, however, as he 
stated that all of the business travel went In the dirce- 
tion of Federal street. E istern avenue, although im- 
portant, was not likely to be built at present, he wa9 
sorrv to say, but if it should be it would not afford 
much relier. 

It might accommodate much of the heavy traffic, 
but not all of the travel which sought an outlet. 
The argument in relation to Charlestown was uot a 
goo't one, for Charlestown could not have any more 
avenues, however desirable. South Boston and 
Charlestown, therefore, furnish no parallel with each 
other. They must, accordingly, be discussed each on 
its own merits. South Boston can be improved, its 
wealth enhanced and its population doubled, and tins 
must be done by opening new avenues, lie tailed to 
se.' why S »nth Host • > w is i \ a iv wiv i d'erior as ;i 
place of residence to Wanl Eleven; and if he were 
about to build al the South End, he shonl I endeavor 
to obtain a site on the high lands of Roxbury rather 
than where the land had been tilled up from the flats. 
South Boston should become, not one of the suburbs 
of l.ost >n, but a part of the South End. 

In conclusion, he should go for the passage of both 
of these measures, as important to the interests of 
the city. In general politics tew public men were up 
with tie people, and so it his been with those intrust- 
ed with municipal legislation respecting needed 
schemes of impr >vem nit. 

Mr. Keith of Ward Fifteen felt called upon to an- 
swer some of the arguments of the gent eraan from 
Ward Three, and avowed himself in favor of all meas 
ures of public improvement calculated for the public 
good. He hid examined the subject with no prejud- 
ices opposed to this measure. Admitting that the 
Board of Alderman was composed of judicious and 
far-seeing men, the Council were here to art upon 
their own judgments, and must be convinced in favor 
of such a measure before being required to vote 
for it. 

d'h.' extension was objectionable because it was 
not on the line of travel which was the shortest and 
most direct to the busin iss centres. The business 
was not on the Common or in that direction. It hid 
been object -d that his argument was not true, that 
the territory adjacent must be raised, but he had 
tak°U pains to inform himself on the subject, and 
beli ve it to be so. In addition he could not see how 
there could be betterments, but, on the contrary, 
estates were injured. To make the avenue of any 
avail, it must not stop at Albany street, but must 
continue on to Washington street. If it goes on, 
necessity will require the raising of the entire terri- 
t >rv, to make it available for travel to advantage. 
llo'rs • railroads would not follow such a course, 
Icavy teams would not piss over such an avenue, 
and it was not expected t tat Indies would walk over 
such an avenuj from South Boston to do their shop- 
ping. It was said that the centra of travel was now 
at Washington and Bovlston streets, but if so, how 
would this travel be relieved by a street ending half 
a mile from there. 

It was belived that the construction of the Eastern 
avenue would give facilities to a large portion of the 
population of South Boston, and if there were mar- 
plots in the Legislature who wer ' hindering its eon- 
struction, be was sorry. If he thought that Broad- 
way ext vision would iii any way relieve the peop'.e of 
South Host hi, he would readily go in favor of it, but 
as h • could not, he must oppos ! the measure. 

Mr. Bishop of Ward. Seven replied to some of the 
reasons of Mr. Keith, contending that Federal street 
was a natural avenu ! only because it was a necessity 
for travel. South Boston had a Hue avenue through 
its whole extent, but when it reaches the shore, it 
was forced to turn about to seek conne lien with the 
city. Broadway extension would greatly enhance 
the value of th 'properly of South Boston and benefit 

the City generally. 

Mr. Wadsworth of Ward Four sail he must judge 
ol'm itl u's by his "wn eyes and observation, and not 
by the reports of other branches of the government. 
In regard to the low value of land in South Boston, 
the difficulty was that the land run the wrong way. 
[f the point was turned round towards Quincy, the 
land would be d mile 1 in vain.' i i a short time. The 
extension was objectionable b?eau$B th ■ avenue 
would have no access exc 'pi ateith sr end, and, as the 
gentleman from Ward Fifteen had said, it would 



be an intolerable nuisance to all the territory between. 
The building of the bridge would cost more than a 
million of dollars, since all projects of the kind ex- 

c -cded most the c-tin at"-. In lie- Bl itemeilts of travel 

there are hoik' made of the number of light carriaj 
and he apprehended tier.' would lie found to be very 
few. If the avenue were extended to Washington 
street, such an extension would not be desirable for 
light travel, and if continued further to Charles Btreet, 
the expense would cost not f-s- than $3,000,000. 
Under these views entertained by him, he did not 

believe that the public convenience and necessity 

required the extension of Broadway, and he could 
not vote for it. 

Mr. Denny of Ward Ten had been in doubt in this 
matter. In listening to the arguments which had 
been made he was satisfied that there was a neeeg. 
sity for greater facilities for the people of South 
Boston, but he was not satisfied thai the extension 
of Broadway would be the best means of meeting 
that want of the people. Federal street must con- 
tinuc to be the great avenue for travel, and the ter- 
ritory would be cut up by th" new avenue in the same 
w.iy which is now the subject for resrret in regard to 
other parts of Boston. If fUrthT facilities were need- 
ed, they should be through parallel streets with those 

now existing. He believed the matter would be safe 

in the hands of another City Government, and was 
willing to trust it to their decision. 

Mr. Snow of Ward Eleven desired to give the rea- 
sons for his vote, notwithstanding the eloquence to 
which the Council had listened. lie disclaimed any 
disposition to withhold from the people of South 
Boston the most ample anil most convenient avenues 
of communication with other portions of the city, 
consistent with the circumstances of their peculiar 
position. His purpose had been in considering the 
proposition to asei rtain what the final result of this 
particular project will be, whether the interests of 
the city will be best served by adopting it at the pres- 
ent time, deferringit for a while, or abandoning it 
altogether. In this, he meant the whole city, each 
section having ths same rights, ami the people of 
South Boston a claim to the same consideration as 
any other portion. lie would not intentionally sav- 
or do anything indicating on his own part a different 
purpose." 

In examining the proposed extensions of Broad- 
way as carefully as his time and dala would permit, 
and listening to the arguments in its favor, with a 
wish to be convinced that his conclusions were er- 
roneous, he would gladly vole in conformity with the 
wishes of the leading citizens of that section, if he 
could possibly see his way to do so. Their asking 
for it, however earnestly,' was no proof that it should 
he done. 

On investigating this part of the question alone, he 
had not been able to convince himself that an absolute 
necessity exists for such a new and independent 
roadway ; that the bridges already opened are not 
and cannot be made sufficient for the present, and 
that others certain lo be built hereafter will not for 
a long time meet all the demands of ooth the heavy 
anil the light trav el. 

It is not needful now to go over in detail the im- 
provements which have been made on Federal street 
and the use certain to be made of that avenue; the 
improvements which mav be made and the travel 
that would then be attract 'd over the Dover street 
bridge; the probability that Eastern avenue will be 
opened before many years and the manner it will then 
be used, as this has been sufficiently explained al- 
ready. Leaving to others the further questions as to 
its cost and as to the particular plan upon which it is 
to be laid out, and not considering how much force 
there may be i.i the objections that the project is not 
Complete enough, and that the grade proposed will 
entail many and costly changes to the territory 
through which it is to pass, he was so clearly of opin- 
ion that the ex tension of Broadway i> not and will 
not be needed for a long time to come, if ever, that 
he must still vote against it. 

On motion of Mr. Flynn of Ward Seven, the pre- 
vious question was ordered. 

The question recurring on the passage of the re- 
solve and order, the motion was lost, bva vote of 37 
yeas and 'Jil nav -, not two. thirds, as follows: 

Yeas— Messrs. Batchelder, Bean, Bishop, Bryden, 
Carney, Harrow, Drlscoll, E nerson, Flynn, Frank- 
lin, Gray, Harris, Heywood, Ilobbs, Jacobs, Keany, 
Knight, Leight m, Minon, Nelson, Newton, Osborn, 
Parker, Lewis Rice, 1! H'kwoll, Kvan, Stevens, Train, 
Tucker. Van Nostra nd, Weston'. Horace II. White. 



PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



87 



John White, Wilson, Woolley, Wright, Young— 37. 

Nays— Belkiuip, Butler, Djnuy, Dinsmore, DolaB, 
Flanders, Hopkins, Jenks, Keith, Kingsbury, Malone, 
Morse, Pickering, Samuel Rice, Rogers, Snow, 
Squires, Thayer, Wadsworth,, Wells— 20. 

WIDENING OF HANOVER STREET. 

The resolve and order tor the widening of Hanover 
Btreet were taken from the table and considered. 

Mr. Rockwell of Ward Ten moved the previous 
question, whieh was earned, when the order was 
passed by a vote of 54 yeas to ■> nays, the nays being 
Messrs. s iow and Squires. 

Mr. Wells of Ward Three moved a reconsideration 
Of the rejection of the order for the extension of 
Broadway. 

The motion was carried, when the question again 
recurring upon its passage, the extension wa. lost by 
a vot ■ ot:!7 to 18, as follow s 

Yeas— Batehelder, Bean, Bishop, Bryden, Carney, 
Darrow, Driscoll, ftmerson. Flvnn, Franklin, Gray, 
Harris, Heywood, Hobbs, Jacobs, Keaney, Knight, 
L i;ht )ii, Slalono, Miuon, Nelson, Newton, Osborn, 
Parker, L. Rice, Rockwell, Train, Tucker, Van Nos- 
trand, wells. Weston, II. II. White, John White, 
Wilson, Woolley, Wright, Young. 

Nays— Belkua'p, Butler, Denny, Dinsmore, Dolan, 
Flanders, Hopkins, Jenks, Keith, Kingsbury, Morse, 
Pickering, S. Rice, Rogers, snow, Squires, Thayer, 
Wadsworth. 

On motion of Mr. Knight of Ward Eight, the report 
oftho committee on homes for the children of sol- 
diers and s illors was taken from the table and referr- 
ed to the next city government. 

VOTE OF I'll ASKS TO nil-: PRESIDENT. 

Mr. Darrow of Ward Eight offered the following- 
resolution : 

Resolved, That the Common Council for the year 
18K8 desire, before separating finally, to express to 
its Presidjut its hearty appreciation of the ability, 
prompt less, and fldelitj with which'he has discharged 
the duties of his office ; an?l to assure him that Its 
members will ret tin a grcatful recollection of his 
services her ', and that he will carry with him in oth- 
er positions in lite their warmest wishes for his wel- 
fare anil success. 

Mr. Bishop of Ward Seven moved to amend by 
subs ituting the following : 

Ordered, That the thanks of the Common Council 
be tendered to Mr. Charles II. Allen for his services 
as President of the Council for tne year 1868. 

This substitute was lost, when the resolution was 
adopt id by a ri dug vote. 

'fiic President responded as follows: 

ADDRESS <>f TI1K PRESIDENT. 

Gentlemen of the C mmon Council: 

for your generous cooperation and support in the 
discharge of my duties as President of the Common 
C tuncil, and fir the good will ami kindly feeling ex- 
pressed in the very complimentary vote whieh has 
been declared by tlie clerk, I desire to return my 
sincere and heartfelt thanks. 

Your unceasing efforts to facilitate the business of 
the Council, your prompt attendance at its meetings, 
your earnest'desire to secure the rights of all, to sus- 
tii:; the rules, and preserve the dignity of our delib- 
erations, have materially contributed to any 9UCCess 
which may have attended my labors as your presid- 
\i\ x officer. 

To the clerk of this Board, who was so long and 
faithfully discharged the duties of his office, and 
whose experience is so valuable, I desire to acknowl- 
edge my personal <>b.i rations. 

During the ye ir many important measures, involv- 
ing large expenditures of money, have been inaug- 
nr tt-'d by the City Government." Among these may 
be mentioned the raising and grading of the Chrueh 
street district, the widening of Tremont, Federal. 
Devonshire and High streets, and the extension of 
Avon place, the work on each of which is now being' 
rapidly completed. 

The 'initiatory steps have been taken and a loan 
authorized for the building of a new street, one hun- 
dred feet in width, upon our water front, to be known 
as Atlantic avenue, which, when finished, will great- 
ly aid in developing the commercial advantages of 
o'urcitv. By the building of this broad and extend- 
ed avenue, with the tracks of the Marginal Railroad 
upon It, affording facilities for the delivery of freight 
from all our steam railroads on shipboard, without 
lire iking bulk, Koston will be made a most desirable 
point for the shipment of the vast produce of the 
great West. 



In addition to the measures heretofore referred to, 
should be mentioned the widening of Hanover street, 
a project of great importance to all our fellow 
citizens. 

Large sums of money have been raised and ex- 
pended for the construction of the Chestnut Hill 
Reservoir, and the undertaking has been pushed 
forward with a zeal and energy highly creditable to 
those to whom the work has been intrusted. 

The addition to the territorial limits of the city by 
the annexation of the city °f Roxbury has also re- 
quired a large outlay of money for water works and 
Other desirable improvements 

The impetus which these expenditures have given 
to this section of the city in the improvement and 
development of real estate is visible in every direc- 
tion, and the increased income from taxation, which 
must necessarily follow, will in a short time fully 
compensate for the outlay, and there can be no 
longer any question but the annexation will result 
for the benefit of the public at large. 

The cause of popular education has received a full 
share of attention. During the year means have 
been provided for the erection of three grammer and 
two primary schoolhouses. 

An ample and well located lot of land has been pro- 
cured upon which it is hoped that our successors v, ill 
immediately proceed to erect a hew house for the use 
of the Girls' High and Normal School. 

The prominent measures which have been mention- 
ed, as well as others of minor importance, together 
with tlie ordinary current expenses ol the city, have 
involved the expenditure of an amount of money 
without precedent in our municipal affairs, and 
which has been raised partly by taxation and partly 
by loans. 

The burden of taxation placed upon our citizens 
has consequently been large, but when the ureal 
advantages to be derived from the numerous im- 
provements made and in progress are thoroughly 
understood by the community, there can be no 
doubt that your wisdom and good judgement will 
receive commendation. 

On this, the closing- day of the year, we are to 
terminate our official relations. May the personal 
friendships which we have formed' continue, and 
may each of us, whether in public or private station, 
do all that in us lies to promote the honor and build 
up the prosperity of the City of Boston. 

Again thanking you for the generous and courte- 
ous treatment I have during the year received from 
each member of the Council, I 'bid you officially, 
farewell. 

On motion of Mr. Snow, of Ward Eleven, it was 

Ordered that the President be requested to furnish 
a. copy of his Address, that the same may be printed 
and bound with the city documents. 

Tlie business of the Council being concluded, a mo- 
tion to adjourn was carried, and the President de- 
clared the Council to be adjourned sine die. 



Proceedings of Board of Aldermen, 



JAN. 2, 1869. 



The dosing meeting of the Board of 1868 was held 

at noon today, Alderman Messinger. the chairman, in 
the chair. 

INSPECTORS OF GAS. 

A communication was received from F. E. Stimp- 
son, stale Inspector of lias Meters, in compliance 
with an order of the Board, Nov. i'.l, in which he 
slates that he found the gas supplied by the South 
Boston, East Boston and Roxoury Gas Light Com- 
panies well purified. 

The gas supplied by the Boston Gas Light Com- 
pany was well purified until the Kith ult.. but since 
that time it has been charged with sulphuretted hy- 
drogen, lie found the illuminating power in all cases 
to be above the standard required by law, viz: 12 can- 
dles. East Boston, lo candles; South Boston 17 can- 
dles; Roxbury, l" 1 . candles; Boston, 18 candles. 

Head and ordered lo be placed on tile. 



86 



FROCK EDI NG S ( ) P CITY COUNCIL. 



PAPERS FROM THE COMMON <'<>! M II.. 

The following papers from the Council were die 
posed ol in concurrence 

Reference of orders for the purchase of Universal 
Fire Extinguishers, to the next City Council. 

Reference to next Citj Council or report of Com- 
mittee on Home for Soldiers' and Sailors' Children. 

Reference to nexl City Council, an order relative to 
meat of diseased cattle slaughtered out of the limits 
of the State. 

The Chairman remarked thai this subject had been 
under consideration by the Committee on Health, 
and measures had been taken to prevent the evil 
complained of. 

The report of the Committei Reduction of the 

( iiy Debt was ordered to be printed. 

The following orders were passed, in concurrence : 

Order that the Messenger pr< cure the suitable bind- 
ing of the City Documents for the year 1868, 

< tnlcr for the presentation of a speaking trumpet to 
John S. Damrell, Chief Engineer of the Fire Depart- 
ment. 

EAST BOSTON FF.liltY COMPANY. 

Alderman Seaver offered the following; 

Whereas, on the 7th .Tune, 1865, the East Boston 
Ferry Company were running two boats between 
Bast Bos'on and the city proper, and wereordered by 
the Board of Aldermen to provide such additional a- 
mount of ferry accommodations as shall lie equivalent 
to at least fifty per cent, increase of the facilities then 
afforded for transportations, and 

Whereas said company did, on the 1st January, 
1869, withdraw two of the boats, and are, at the pres- 
ent time running only two boats, and 

Whereas, in the opinion of this Board, Hi*' public 
convenience requires that said company should fur- 
nish additional ferry accommodation, it is therefore, 

Ordered, that said East Boston Ferry Company be 
directed to run three boats between East Boston and 
the city proper, namely ; two boats between the land- 
ings ot tne East Boston ferry, and one boat between 
the landings formely occupied by the People's Ferry 
Company, Said boats t<> be run at such hoars as shall 
best accomm (date the public travel. 

The order was adopted, alter some remarks iu favor 
by Alderman Talbot. 

REPORTS OF COMMITTEES. 

Alderman Rich irds. from the Committee on Public 
Buildings, on the subject of a new house for Engine 
Company No. 8, reported that the order directing the 
Committee on the Fire Department to remove Engine 
No. s to the house of Hose Company No. 1, Salem 
street, ought to pass 

Alderman Pratt called for the reasons for the pro- 
posed action. 

Alderman Richards stated that the subject had been 
before the committee during the whole season, that 
the present house was unfit for the uses of the com- 
pany and the engine, and that as a new engine was 
so in to be furnished, il was deemed important to re- 
move to the house in Salem street, capacious enough 
for both the companies, and for the advantage of the 
city in having the engine and the hose companies to- 
gether. 

Alderman Pratt moved that the subject be referred 
to the next city government, objecting to have the 
matter passed at this late day, when no opportunity 
was presented for offering the objections to the meas- 
ure. The hose house in Salen street was not large 
enough for the engine and the hose companies, and 
in the contemplated lay+ng-out of Atlantic avenue, 
the location of the engine company should be in North 
square or in that vicinity. If delayed, he could pre- 
sent strong remonstrances against the proposed loca- 
tion. It was ohjectiona ble because Salem street was 
narrow and liable to be blocked with snow. 

Alderman Richards, in reply, stated that the hose 
bouse in Salem street was much larger than any other 
of that class, and would furnish ample accommoda- 
tions for both companies. The argument in relation 
to Atlantic avenue was not in point, since, if a house 
was to be built for this engine, no new one should be 
built at t' lc preseut lime, and provision must be made 
for the safety of the present engine. 

Alter further remarks by Alderman Pratt and by 
Alderman Paul, the last named Stating that he should 
vote for the motion, because he knew nothing of the 
matter, and because both of the gentlemen were to be 
members of the next Board, the question was taken. 

The motion to refer to the next Board Ol Aldermen 
was lost, five to seven, when the order was adopted. 



Alderman Talbot, from the Committee on Laying 
out and \\ idening streets, made a final report in prim. 
'I he Committee state that the amount of assessments 

for betterment- made Bince the law took effect is 
9264,495 12. In regard to Devonshire street, the com- 
nnitee remark : 

The plans of the Government Architect -.•( the new 
Post Office and Sub-Treasury Building back Ave 
teet from the line of Devonshire Btreet, for the purpose 
of increasing the width of the Bidewalk, where it will 
be most needed, making it about thirteen lectin 
width. 

The land taken from the Government, between 
Milk and Water streets, has cost the city $86,985 00; 
between Water and S( ite streets the cost is not poei- 
tively known, but is estimated at $304,253 00, making 
a total Of $391,237 00. 

The betterments on this street will undoubtedly be 
assessed during the next municipal year, after the 
widening has been fully completed. No estimate has 

been made of the amount to be us-c>sed, but the wid- 
ening is no doubt a great benefit to the propertv on 
the street. 

Federal Street. The widening of this street, be- 
tween the foot of Summer street and Hist street in 
South Boston, has been about One-half completed up 
to the present time. The remaining buildings vi ill be 
cut off or moved back to the new line of the street 
early the coming year. 

The betterment on this street will probably not be 
so large as on some other streets, but still 'the Com- 
mittee are of the opinion that the widening will con- 
siderably enhance the value ol the abutting estates. 

Tremont Street. The widening of this street be- 
twecn Boylston streel and the Boston & Albany Rail- 
road bridge to sixty feet, has been nearly completed; 
there remains only Hotel Pelham, which will be re- 
moved as soon as practicable during the ensuing sea- 
son ; and the brick block south OfChurch street, which 
will be removed back to the new line of the street, 
probably before the coming spring. The damages to 
estates on the street have been nearly all settled, with 
the exception of those south of Pleasant street which 
are on the Church street District, and which estates 
the city lias taken under the '-Church Street Act."' 
The settlement of damages to these estates will be 
made when they are conveyed back by the city to 
the owners. 

The grade of this street will be raised about six 
feet at Church street, which will greatly improve it 
between Pleasant street and the railroad bridge. It 
will also be raised about eighteen inches at Eliot 
street, which will considerably relieve the depression 
in the street at that point. 

It is expected that the betterments on this street 
will cover a large portion of the expense, and can, 
without doubt, be assessed next year. 

Matthews Street. This street was widened on its 
southerly side by a Resolve passed July 12, 1867; that 
Widening was completed that year". Tin- second 
widening was on the northerly side of the street, be- 
tween Fed'-ral street and Leather square; and was 
authorized by a Resolve passed October 23, 1868. The 
last widening has been only partly completed; two 
houses yet remain to be cut off near Leather square. 
As there were two widening^, it has been necessary 
to make two assessments for betterments. The esti- 
mated cost oft he two widenings was $28,826. $12,44530 
has been assessed for betterments, leaving the net 
cost to the city (based on estimate of damages), 
$16,380 70. 

Extension of Brimmer Street. The extension of 
this street from Mt. Vernon to Chestnut street was 
petitioned for, principally by the abutters on that 
street, and was extended by a resolve passed October 
9, 1868. 

This improvement is thought to be at the present 
time one of chiefly local benefit— without doubt con- 
siderably enhancing the value of the property on 
that street, and in that immediate vicinity. 

After assessing the betterments, the committee say 
that the net cost to the city of the Improvement will 
be $637 87. 

Extension of Avon Place. This was petitioned for 
principally by the abutters and those locally interest- 
ed. It was done at an estimated cost ol $30,000; the 
whole of which, it i> expected, will be returned to 
the city Treasury from betterments. 

Streets in Church Street District. At the time the 
Church Street District was taken under the Act of 
the Legislature, there were but two streets on that 
territory that had been laid out as public streets; 
namely, Church street and Fayette street. 



PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



89 



since the taking of the property by the City, all the 
streets that were regarded as private streets on that 
district have been laid out as public streets and the 
following streets have been widened, viz : Marion 
street, widened 1" about thirty-five feel ; Sotrth < ledar 
street, widened Id thirty-three and one-half feet at 
Pleasant street, thirty-seven and one-half feet at, 
Church street, and thirty-seven feel at Ferdinand 

street; I'iedinonl street, widened to about thirty and 

one-half feet between Pleasant and Church streets, 
and to about twenty- eight feet between Church and 
Ferdinand streets ; Shawraut street widened to forty 
feet; Berlin street, widened to forty feet; and Ten- 
nyson street, widened to forty (V el. 

Nearly all the property taken for widening these 
streets had previously been taken by the city under 
the "Church Street Act," the only exception oeing a 
few estates bordering on Pleasant street that are 
outside of the limits or the territory taken. 

The total estimated cost of widening the above, 
named streets is $141,800, but as the carrying for- 
ward of these widenings is so intimately connected 
with the raising of the church street territory, the 
actual expense may be much less. The widening of 
these street? has undouptedly enhanced the value of 
the abutting estates considerably, but no estimate 
has yet been made of the amount of betterment. 

Columbus Avenue. This street was extended from 
Ferdinand to Church street, by a resovle passed Oc- 
tober!), 1868. The land was taken from the City of 
Boston, — the estates through which it passed having 
previously been taken under the "Church Street Act. 
The estimated cost from Ferdinand to Church street 

was $67,000. The buildings are being demolished, 
and the street cut through, as fast as practicable, to 

church street. 

The Committee regret to state that they are unable 
to report to the Board any Satisfactory basis for ne- 
gotiation with the Boston & Providence Railroad 
Corporotion, for the rfemoval of their passenger sta- 
tion, so as to allow the extension of this important 
avenue straight to Park square; or even the exten- 
sion efitbj a slighl bend or curve, so that it would 
come out opposite Eliot street. Till some satisfac- 
tory agreement is made with thai Corporation for 
the removal of their station house. Berlin street 
(which is laid out forty feet in width) will have to he 
used as the outlet to Columbus avenue. 

Fort JIM. The delay in carving forward this 
improvement has been owing to the fact that there 
has been no suitable place to deposit the earth: hut 
the building of Atlantic avenue, and the Ailing of the 
docks above it, will require nearly, if not all the earth 
to lie removed from the hill, and it only remains for 
the next city Council to at once take hold of this great 
work, ami carry it forward to completion. 

The work of grading Oliver street has been com- 
pleted during the past year, and the street has been 
partly paved. The paving will be completed early 
the coming year, and tin 1 assessments made on the 
abutting estates, as provided by law. 

Atlantic Avenue. The Board of Aldermen have al- 
ready authorized the building of the street, and it is 
expected thai piles will he driven for the sea-wa 11 dur- 
ing the presenl winter: and perhaps the tilling of 
certain docks inside of the street may be soon com- 
menced by the owners. 

Alderman Paul, from the Committee on sewers, re- 
ported orders for the collection of assessments tor a 
sewer in Norfolk avenue, amounting t . ; » s:;-.'(ki 90; also 
fora sewer in Tremont street; amounting to $562 85. 
Severally passed. 

Alderman Talbot, from the committee of laying out 
and widening streets, ottered a resolve which was 
adopted, as follow s : 

Resolved, That in the opinion of this Board ,no 
assessment should be made on account of benefits to 
any estates in consequence of the laying out. widen- 
ing or extension of t he following named streets, un- 
der the following described resolves. The resolves 
relates to more than one hundred streets, the resolves 
referring to them dating from June 7, 1866, to Febru- 
ary 15, 1868. 

ORDERS PASSED. 

Order to pay Bonner & Sutherland $681, in addition 
to previous payments, said sums being in full for all 
work done by them in removing the earth and other 
materials from Oliver street, Washington square and 
Belmont street, and from the land abutting on said 
streets, the same to he charged to appropriations for 
Oliver street. 

On motion of Alderman white it was 

Ordered, That all matters of an unfinished nature 



in the hands of the several standing committees of the 
Board he referred to the next Board of Aldermen. 

VOTE OF ITIANKS Til TltlC MAYOR. 

Alderman Braman offered the following, which he 
said he did with much pleasure, as a retiring member 
of the Board. 

Resolve, Thai the Hoard of Aldermen for the year 
1368, whose official labors are now about to close, 
present their thanks to His Honor. Nathaniel 1',. 
ShurtlelV, for the uniform courtesy and kindne-s 
which lias marked his connection witn this Boardand 
lor iiie just ami impartial manner with which he has 
presided over our deliberations, and that we tender 
him our best wishes for his continued health, happi- 
ness ami prospi rity. 

Alderman Woodman opposed the adoption of the 
resolution and demanded the yeas and nays <>n its 
passage. 

Alderman Cobb seconded the adoption of the reso- 
lution, in remarks as follows: 

"Mr. Chairman: l take pleasure in seconding the 
resolution of thanks which has just been Offered; 
and I do so because I believe it due to His Honor, 
for the courtesy and kindness which lias character- 
ized his intercourse with the members of the board 
during the municipal year which is now about to close; 
and as a mark of respect and good will on the part 
of the board for the executive of the ( 'My ( lovernment. 
i hope, sir, the resolution will be adopted." 

The resolution was adopted, Alderman Woodman 
only voting in the negative. 

'I lie .Mayor took the chair and addressed the Board 
as follows : 

MAYOR SHURTDEFF'S REMARKS. 

Gentlemen of the Board of Aldermen: For the compli- 
mentary vote that has just been passed, allow me to 
return to you my warmest thanks. I most gratefully 
acknowledge and appreciate the kindness which dic- 
tated it. 1\ my services to the city and my well- 
meant intentions to you have heen construed correct- 
ly, which your vote would indicate, 1 have s 1 rea- 
son to believe that 1 have not endeavored in vain. 
in all matters of the common weal we have harmoni- 
zed; and the courtesy that has been extended to me, 
and which 1 have most honestly striven to exhibit to 
you, 1 think has been felt and acknowledged by all the 
gentlemen of the Hoard. 

The past year has been one of the most eventful, as 
far as general public improvements are concerned, of 
all the forty-Six that, have transpired since Boston be- 
came a city. School-houses have been erected to pro- 
mote education and cultivate the arts of civilization ; 
streets and public avenues have been built, widened 
and extended, for the purpose of facilitating business 
and advancing the mercantile, mechanical, manufac- 
turing and commercial interests of the City; and all 
kinds Of matters thai could in any w ay bent lit Ihe cit- 
izens by protecting persons and property, in preser- 
ving health by preventing disease, and iii giving com- 
fort and happiness bj affording pleasure ami amuse- 
ments, have always received your at ten I ions and been 
promoted bj your counsel anil endeavors. Von have 
fed the poor and needy; you have entertained the 
stranger, von have given rest and hospitality to the 

weary; you have clad the naked, and wan 1 Ihe 

colli ; you have cherished harmony by dispensing mu- 
sic's sweel strains in deli -lillul ' liaVinony ; by your 
schools and your library you have afforded instruc- 
tion to all who desired it, of every nation, tongue, and 
color; you have not willingly left anything undone 
that could relieve distress, enlighten the mind, pro- 
duce pleasure, and promote all the besl interests of 
the public, [nail these endeavors you have been 
faithful stewards; you have. served full' well the behests 
of your constituents; you have honored your positions, 
and deser\ ed well of your fellow citizens, w ho may 
with great satisfaction feel proud of their representa- 
tives. 

What you have done has cost in some instances 
much money. In return you have given increased 
Value to property, and you have less, ned (he (axes and 

burdens upon ihe people. In some instances you may 

have Cast bread upon the waters, bul von nine be sure 
it will return, and thai before many days, it you have 
expended much, il has not been to lavish money, hut 
to augment advantages, to make inv estments that at 
an early day will repaj most liberally, and swell up 
the amounts of gain in a manifold degree. 

But, gentlemen, w e are soon to terminate our asso- 
ciations for Ihe year,- the Hoard Of Aldermen for the 
year 18SS will soon be no more; Let its remembran- 
ces in the future be pleasant. Lei us look back to the 



<>u 



PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



periorl we have been here together, and cherish in our 
memories all that has been harmonious, useful and 

a '.it •cable, and forgel all thai has in any way been 
otherwise. ! assure you, I shall pari with the Board 
today u iiii the besl or feelings, and with no heart bick- 
erings. I shall hope to meet, through the remainder 
of my life, In the bonds of the purest friendship, those 
who have been my friends ami associates during the 
past year. Those of us who leave the Board to be use- 
ful elsewhere we must regret to part with. Those \\ ho 
ret urn to renew their obligations to perform tin- trusts 
of their fellow citizens must resolve t<> preserve their 
old friendships, ami continue mi in their endeavors for 
faithful, disinterested ami untiring labor for the good 
of our beloved city. 

Gentlemen of the Board, in leaving my scat. I bid 
the Ho. .i-i I of Aldermen of the year 1868 a most affec- 
tionate farewell, wishing all its members the blessings 
ol'a pleasant future, with health, prosperity, ami all 
I lie comforts that our Heavenly Father can' vouchsafe 
tn humanity. 

VOTE OF THANKS TO THE CHAIRMAN. 

Alderman Talbot offered the following: 

Resolved, That the thanks of this Board bo tendered 
to its chairman, George \V. Messinger, for tin? valua- 
ble sen ices be has rendered the Board during the de- 
liberations of the past year, in which were apparent 
that wisdom and intelligence which nothing but long 
experience in municipal affairs can create. 

The motion was briefly advocated by Alderman 
Talbot ami seconded by Alderman Paul. 

The resolve was unanimously passed. 

Alderman Messinger took the chair and addressed 
the Board, as follows: 

ALDERMAN MESSINGER'S REMARKS. 

Gentlemen of the Board of Aldermen: In response 
to your complimentary resolution I return you my 
sincere acknowledgements, and at the same' time I 
desire to give my testimony as to (he great labor 
performed and valuable services rendered by my 
associates in the various committees of this Board. 

The Hoard of Aldermen, acting as a Board of Health, 
with the powers of ( !ouuty< lommissioners and as Sur- 
veyors of Highways, exercise a most important part 
in the administration of the City Government. The en- 
largement of the boundaries of tie city by the annex- 
ation of Roxbury has increased its duties and respon- 
sibilities. I have no hesitation at this tira i i express, 
ing my opinion that the Hoard should regulate its own 
affairs and appoint its own standing and joint com- 
mittees. Under the present charter the chairman ofthe 
Hoard of 1855 appointed its committees, but since that 
time the Hoard have tendered the nomination of the 
regular committees to Mis Honor the Mayor. 

I think this latter course was not Contemplated by 
the trainers ofthe charter, and that it interferes with 
the independent action of its members. A contingen- 
cy might arise under partv excitement that a Mayor 
would be chosen whose views of public policy would 
not correspond with the sentiments of a majority of 
the Hoard. In that case the constitution of the com- 
mittees under the present rule would be likely to pre- 
vent iiar.no. dons action. I have little regard for any 
precedents which would i it rfere with fie rights and 
privileges of a body, and as ther • is no doubt as to the 
powers of the Board in the premises, I trust the rules 
may be amended in the future. There have been at- 
tempts made at various times to amend the city char- 
ter by increasing the tenure of office ofthe Aldermen 
and Council, but without success; I think it very de- 
sirable tli-' t "t least one-halt ofthe Aldermen should 
be chosen for two years. 

I cannot in this brief address comment on all the 
departments of the Government — of the Health De- 
partment, which has been under my immediate sup ir- 
vision I have only to repeat what I have before stated 
iu a former address, that this department is well or- 
ganized and has done good service in the matter of 
abating nuisances, removing offal and cleaning the 
mi\ ouo. j. ne > u\ , uwniug u..- cares, nurses and imple- 



ments employing a regular force of mechanics and la- 
borers under the direction of experienced superin- 
tendents— doing its own v ork— has a great advantage 
over the contract system of other cities, and, nil things 
considered, is more economical. The City Physician 
i- connected with this branch ofthe service, and ren- 
d i ra important aid in sanitary matters. 

The report of the Superintendent, ^i\ ing the details 
ofthe service, will be presented to the new Govern- 
ment. 

Ofthe Public Institutions of the city— a report ofthe 
Inspectors of Prisons lias been recently made— the 
Hoard of Directors is compos-ed of public-spirited cit- 
izens who give much valuable time to carry out those 
improvements which are deemed most beneficial. 
The subject of a new Lunatic Hospital Bhould receive 
the early attention ofthe new Government. The In- 
spectors very truly say that tiie present building at 
South Boston is discreditable to the city. Another 
subject to which they ask attention is the' separation 
ofthe paupers at Deer Island from the criminal and 
reformatory institutions. It is certainlj very desira- 
ble this should be done as Boon as another building 
can be built for their accommodation. 

In regard to the increase of expenditures a- would 
appear from the report ofthe Committee on Finance, 
snowing the net increase of debt for 1868 t i be $3,864,- 
ls, 49, it should be borne in mind that a considerable 
portion of that sum is for leans authorized, but not 
paid. 

Nil portion ofthe authorized loan for the construc- 
tion of the Atlantic avenue, $1,200,000, has yet been 
used, and for an import ml work of this magnitude a 
considerable time must be taken for its construction. 

Although the prospective increase of the city debt 
may appear large, yet in my judgment all the projec- 
ted improvements will be for the advantage of our 
city, giving an increased value to property ami en- 
larged facilities for business operations. 

The report of the Committee on streets will show 
the extent of the business of this department and the 
projected widenings, part of which— those of Federal, 
Devonshire and Tremont streets— being now under 
way, as well as the extension of Avon place. 

The raising and grading of the Church street dis- 
trict is progressing, and 1 trust the early attention of 
the next Government will be given to raising the grade 
of the Suffolk street district, for which authority is 
given the city by an ad ofthe Legislature. This" in- 
cludes a lar.ee part of the territory bounded by Dover, 
Tremont, Pleasant and Washington streets. Surveys 
and examinations are now being made under the di- 
rection of our experienced City Surveyor,Mr. Thomas 
W*. Davis. By the raising of this territory, not only 
will all the property be benefited, but an opportunity 
will be given to extend Shawmut avenue to Common 
and Tremont streets, thus relieving Tremont street 
ami giving the citizens the advantage of another tine 
avenm to the Highland district. 

Of the important service rendered by my associates 
at this Board in the Committees on Streets, Public 
Buildings, Paving, Sewers, Lamps, Public Lands, 
Fire Alarms, Police and Licenses and others, 1 would 
like to speak, but time will not permit. 

I cannot close my remarks, however, without mak- 
ing some allusion to some of our officials who hold 
positions of great responsibility. I refer to the City 
Clerk and Treasurer, anil I wish to savin this connec- 
tion, that I consider their present salaries entirely 
inadequate for the important services rendered, and I 
trust they will receive that consideration from the new 
Government to which they are so fully entitled. 

It only remains for me ' now', gentlemen, to again 
thank you, and, as Chairman ofthe Hoard of 1868, af- 
ter wishing you health and prosperity, to say Fare- 
well. 

On motion of Alderman Cobb, copies of the re- 
marks ofthe Mayor and Alderman .Messinger were 
ordered to be printed. 

Alderman Talbot moved an adjournment, and there 
being no further business the Board adjourned sine 
die. 



391+9 007